local onduleur/comptage ... de l'EDF?

English translation: UPS room / metering room...

20:08 Jan 11, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
French term or phrase: local onduleur/comptage ... de l'EDF?
8-2 Mesures conservatoires, demandes en cours pour divisibilité ultérieure du bâtiment :

8-2-1 Local onduleur :

Attente plans détaillés et descriptif.

8-2-2 Local comptage :

8-2-3 Poste publique EDF :

Attente dossier correspondant.
Gregory Fischer
United States
Local time: 04:02
English translation:UPS room / metering room...
Explanation:
onduleur = uninterruptible power supply for computers and other critical plant. Universally referred to as UPS.

Comptage = presumably metering, as suggested in an earlier answer by Bourth.

Local = room, probably, depdning a bit on its actual size --- might be a cupboard or a vast hall! But given the likely size of such items, I think 'room' is about right --- think of plant room, boiler room, tank room, etc.

as for poste publique EDF --- I'm not quite so sure of my ground here, but clearly EDF is Electricité de France, the French public electricity supply authority; as for 'poste' I would imagine this as being the incoming main, where the board sealed fuses and master meter are installed; from this point forth, the installation is the responsibility of the customer. Sometimes referred to as a 'power head'.

But I don't know why they're talking about 'publique' --- I don't for a moment imagine the public have access to it ;-)

So it may just be that this is the point where the connection is made to the 'public electricity supply network'

In the absence of more specific information, I'd assume that this is logically what it is, and would be inclined to call it "incoming EDF main electricity connection point", or something a little less clumsy as you see fit.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 45 mins (2004-01-11 22:54:27 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

As Bourth so rightly points out, that \'poste\' should of course be \'substation\' --- so we\'d have \'EDF substation\'
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 10:02
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2UPS room / metering room...
Tony M
5 +1As above, then "substation"
xxxBourth


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
As above, then "substation"


Explanation:
When you think about it, there are hundreds if not thousands of people in a building complex, more in many cases than in some large villages or small towns. Since the latter will have an EDF substation serving them, it makes sense that a building will require one too.

I THINK EDF installs its own equipment on private property, a bit like you electricity meter and everything else at that point of the incoming supply which is on your property but under EDF lead-and-wire seal. Hence the "public" because it belongs to the EDF which, for the moment at least, is a public-sector entity.

xxxBourth
Local time: 10:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 18679

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, of course!
1 hr
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
UPS room / metering room...


Explanation:
onduleur = uninterruptible power supply for computers and other critical plant. Universally referred to as UPS.

Comptage = presumably metering, as suggested in an earlier answer by Bourth.

Local = room, probably, depdning a bit on its actual size --- might be a cupboard or a vast hall! But given the likely size of such items, I think 'room' is about right --- think of plant room, boiler room, tank room, etc.

as for poste publique EDF --- I'm not quite so sure of my ground here, but clearly EDF is Electricité de France, the French public electricity supply authority; as for 'poste' I would imagine this as being the incoming main, where the board sealed fuses and master meter are installed; from this point forth, the installation is the responsibility of the customer. Sometimes referred to as a 'power head'.

But I don't know why they're talking about 'publique' --- I don't for a moment imagine the public have access to it ;-)

So it may just be that this is the point where the connection is made to the 'public electricity supply network'

In the absence of more specific information, I'd assume that this is logically what it is, and would be inclined to call it "incoming EDF main electricity connection point", or something a little less clumsy as you see fit.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 45 mins (2004-01-11 22:54:27 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

As Bourth so rightly points out, that \'poste\' should of course be \'substation\' --- so we\'d have \'EDF substation\'

Tony M
France
Local time: 10:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 14351

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBourth: Right on all counts except the poste which has to be a substation.
19 mins
  -> Thanks, Alex! And of course you're right...!

agree  xxxsarahl
22 mins
  -> Thanks, Sarahl!
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