raide à la toile

English translation: stiff

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase: raide à la toile
English translation:stiff
Entered by: Anita Planchon

16:07 Jun 12, 2018
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Transport / Transportation / Shipping / boat design
French term or phrase: raide à la toile
First and foremost it was a project for a rapid sailing yacht that must absolutely not « taper au
près » - a very difficult condition for the new lengthened version. If she was to be fast, she had to be relatively
light and « raide à la toile » - and if light, she might slam too hard.
kashew
France
Local time: 06:20
stiff
Explanation:
The technical term would be "initial stability" which is the stability of the boat when pressure is applied to the sails, but to go with the rest of the sentence, I would simply say the boat needed to be "light and stiff".

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Note added at 1 hr (2018-06-12 17:33:06 GMT)
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The reason I haven't suggested "stiff under sail" is that "stiff" in this case means that it is stable "when under sail", so there's no need.
Selected response from:

Anita Planchon
Australia
Local time: 06:20
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +1stiff
Anita Planchon
3transversely/laterally stable
mrrafe
Summary of reference entries provided
Sometimes Wikipedia can be helpful, plus others
Nikki Scott-Despaigne

  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
transversely/laterally stable


Explanation:
Stiffness in this context means the boat resists being moved sideways by the force of the wind. Transverse or lateral stability. I don't know whether there's a more colloquial term for this.

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Note added at 36 mins (2018-06-12 16:44:01 GMT)
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Maybe the colloquialism is "stiff to the wind." https://www.alubat.com/ovni-445

mrrafe
United States
Local time: 00:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: "to sail stiff to the wind" is good.
1 hr
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
stiff


Explanation:
The technical term would be "initial stability" which is the stability of the boat when pressure is applied to the sails, but to go with the rest of the sentence, I would simply say the boat needed to be "light and stiff".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2018-06-12 17:33:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The reason I haven't suggested "stiff under sail" is that "stiff" in this case means that it is stable "when under sail", so there's no need.


    Reference: http://www.wavetrain.net/boats-a-gear/454-modern-sailboat-de...
Anita Planchon
Australia
Local time: 06:20
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: Many thanks, Anita.

Asker: Thanks again.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Yes a stiff boat is one with good stability.
21 mins
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Reference comments


1 hr
Reference: Sometimes Wikipedia can be helpful, plus others

Reference information:
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raideur_à_la_toile

https://books.google.fr/books?id=_am8AQAAQBAJ&pg=PT147&lpg=P...

"A sailing boat which has good stability is said to be 'stiff' under sail; bu a boat of poor stability is said to be 'crank' under sail, which implies a tendency to capsize."


Oxford A-Z of Sailing Terms, Dear, I. and Kemp, P. :

"stiff... indicates that she returns quickly to the vertical when rolling in a heavy seaway and, when applied to a vessel under sail, is one that stands up well to her canvas. This is a function of the metacentric height which has been built into the ship..."


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Note added at 1 hr (2018-06-12 18:05:50 GMT)
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Also, CLouet, A. G., Dictionnaire technique maritime, La Maison du dictionnaire:

"raide : stiff (nav); qualifie un navire ayant un couple de rappel très fort, ce qui donne un roulis court et rapide. (Anton. : mou)."

"raide (à la toile) : stiff (yacht); qualifie un voilier qui résiste au vent sans trop gîter."

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
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