soie

English translation: setae (hairs or bristles)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:soie
English translation:setae (hairs or bristles)
Entered by: Charles Davis

18:02 Aug 16, 2015
French to English translations [PRO]
Science - Zoology
French term or phrase: soie
In a document about bees, I have the following sentence:

Des substances chimiques sont retenues à la surface du corps de l'insecte (cuticule, soies, pattes) pouvant, selon leur nature et leur toxicité, provoquer sa mort.

Various chemical substances are retained on the insect's surface (e.g. cuticle, ..., legs) and may, depending on their nature and toxicity, cause death.

Anyone seen "soie" to do with bees or other insects?
Thanks in advance!
CMarc
France
Local time: 12:17
setae
Explanation:
Taking up Tony's challenge... If you do want a more "technical" term, this, I think, is it. Actually "hairs" is perfectly OK, and many bee-related texts use it. They are specifically the "hairs" on the bee's legs which it uses as "combs" and "brushes". Here's a nice page on bees' legs:
http://www.bumblebee.org/bodyLegs.htm#combs and brushes

"Le premier segment des trois paires de pattes possède une touffe de soies à sa face interne [...]"
https://books.google.es/books?id=_VvsNzmvkp4C&pg=PA532&lpg=P...

"Seta, plural: setae, is a biological term derived from the Latin word for "bristle". It refers to a number of different bristle- or hair-like structures on living organisms."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seta

"The term scopa (Latin: a broom) is used to refer to any of a number of different modifications on the body of a non-parasitic bee that form a pollen-carrying apparatus. In most bees, the scopa is simply a particularly dense mass of elongated, often branched, hairs (or setae) on the hind leg."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scopa_(biology)

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Note added at 21 mins (2015-08-16 18:24:22 GMT)
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Sorry, your question is "soie", singular, and the singular of setae is seta, so that should really have been my answer.
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 12:17
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3setae
Charles Davis
3 +2hairs
Tony M
3 +1bristles
patrickfor


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
hairs


Explanation:
Bees have 'hairy' bodies — soft, silky hair, which probably isn't actual 'hair' at all, but some kind of cilla.

But you'd better check if there is a more technical term for it!

Tony M
France
Local time: 12:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charles Davis: "Hair" is OK
15 mins
  -> Thanks, Charles!

agree  Michele Fauble: I suggest 'hairs (setae)'.
5 hrs
  -> Merci, Michele !
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
soies
bristles


Explanation:
From the body surface of the insect there arises a profusion of fine bristles most of which have a sensory function,
http://www.biology-resources.com/insect-structure.html

patrickfor
France
Local time: 12:17
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charles Davis: Yes, this is really what they are.
1 min
  -> Thanks Charles! I used plural as in the text it reads "soies" and I changed it (see above) soies/bristles
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
setae


Explanation:
Taking up Tony's challenge... If you do want a more "technical" term, this, I think, is it. Actually "hairs" is perfectly OK, and many bee-related texts use it. They are specifically the "hairs" on the bee's legs which it uses as "combs" and "brushes". Here's a nice page on bees' legs:
http://www.bumblebee.org/bodyLegs.htm#combs and brushes

"Le premier segment des trois paires de pattes possède une touffe de soies à sa face interne [...]"
https://books.google.es/books?id=_VvsNzmvkp4C&pg=PA532&lpg=P...

"Seta, plural: setae, is a biological term derived from the Latin word for "bristle". It refers to a number of different bristle- or hair-like structures on living organisms."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seta

"The term scopa (Latin: a broom) is used to refer to any of a number of different modifications on the body of a non-parasitic bee that form a pollen-carrying apparatus. In most bees, the scopa is simply a particularly dense mass of elongated, often branched, hairs (or setae) on the hind leg."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scopa_(biology)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 mins (2015-08-16 18:24:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, your question is "soie", singular, and the singular of setae is seta, so that should really have been my answer.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 12:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you! This is great.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Brilliant! trust that man to come up with the goods :-)
3 mins
  -> Ha! Thanks, Tony :) Though I think this is more of a footnote to yours and Patrick's really.

agree  Yolanda Broad
3 hrs
  -> Thank you, Yolanda!

agree  Michele Fauble: I suggest 'hairs (setae)'.
5 hrs
  -> That sounds like a good compromise. Thanks, Michele :)
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