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en régie plafonnée

English translation: cost plus fixed fee

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:en régie plafonnée
English translation:cost plus fixed fee
Entered by: Laura Robertson
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09:49 Aug 31, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Accounting
French term or phrase: en régie plafonnée
this appears in a document outlining costing for a project. Certain phases of the project are "en régie plafonnée"

Is there a neater way of saying "on the basis of actual costs with a maximum upper limit"?

Many thanks
Laura Robertson
France
Local time: 21:17
cost plus fixed fee
Explanation:
If "plafonnée" refers to the cost of materials, the contractor might be taking a risk.

In a "cost plus fixed fee" contract, the client pays the costs of materials etc. plus a negotiated flat rate for overheads and profits. As opposed to a "cost plus percentage" contract where the contractor's fees are a percentage of the cost of materials.

Low confidence because I don't understand what "plafonnée" refers to specifically.

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Note added at 45 mins (2006-08-31 10:34:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Looking at the following, and particularly the accompanying graph:

Les contrats de type régie
• Contrat dont le bénéfice est fixé à l’avance et ne dépend pas du prix de revient.
• Le contractant présente ses factures au client sur la base des charges engagées et justifiées.
• Un prix de revient plafond à payer par le client peut être défini (régie plafonnée) ou non (régie non plafonnée).
http://www.inh.fr/enseignements/idp/idp2005/autour/types_con...

it would appear this is indeed a cost plus fixed fee contract.
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 21:17
Grading comment
Thanks, the customer was happy with this term.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4with a specified upset limitMatthewLaSon
2cost plus fixed feexxxBourth


  

Answers


39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
cost plus fixed fee


Explanation:
If "plafonnée" refers to the cost of materials, the contractor might be taking a risk.

In a "cost plus fixed fee" contract, the client pays the costs of materials etc. plus a negotiated flat rate for overheads and profits. As opposed to a "cost plus percentage" contract where the contractor's fees are a percentage of the cost of materials.

Low confidence because I don't understand what "plafonnée" refers to specifically.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 45 mins (2006-08-31 10:34:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Looking at the following, and particularly the accompanying graph:

Les contrats de type régie
• Contrat dont le bénéfice est fixé à l’avance et ne dépend pas du prix de revient.
• Le contractant présente ses factures au client sur la base des charges engagées et justifiées.
• Un prix de revient plafond à payer par le client peut être défini (régie plafonnée) ou non (régie non plafonnée).
http://www.inh.fr/enseignements/idp/idp2005/autour/types_con...

it would appear this is indeed a cost plus fixed fee contract.

xxxBourth
Local time: 21:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 67
Grading comment
Thanks, the customer was happy with this term.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
with a specified upset limit


Explanation:
Hello,

Bourth is not wrong at all. He just didn't finish it off. In question is indeed a cost plus fixed fee contract. However, there is more to it than that. It means that two parties have negociated this contract with a specified upset limit; hence, the word "plafonnée" (ceiling). Some cost plus-fixed fee contracts are "en rég non
plafonnée", meaning "without any specified upset limit."

So, this is a cost plus fixed fee with an upset limit.

I'm not sure, but "régie" means how something is controlled/dictated." In this case, "in upset limit control/dictated by an upset limit."

By the way, it's best to use the word "specified" in the English translation.

I hope this helps.




    Reference: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/REALESTATE/agfdrwsc.htm
    Reference: http://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=87029&page=4
MatthewLaSon
Local time: 15:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 38
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