voix antenne

English translation: continuity announcer

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:voix antenne
English translation:continuity announcer
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21:52 Jul 7, 2018
    The asker opted for community grading. The question was closed on 2018-07-11 12:54:08 based on peer agreement (or, if there were too few peer comments, asker preference.)


French to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Advertising / Public Relations / Advertising services proposal
French term or phrase: voix antenne
In a radio advertising proposal :

[message publicitaire] enregistré par la *voix antenne* au début de la météo.

When Googled, the first posts associate the term with "habillage sonore". I suppose it means the person animating the radio show, but I need help in finding the equivalent in English.

Any help would be most welcome.

Thanks
nessieB
Local time: 04:02
continuity announcer
Explanation:
This is what it sounds like —the voice we are all used to hearing, yet has no actual 'personality'; the 'voice of the radio station', in a way, that makes the links between programmes, etc. Usually, in the UK, this voice would not be allowed to be used for commercials, as it would make the distinction between 'programme' and 'commercial' less clear.

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Note added at 7 hrs (2018-07-08 05:02:15 GMT)
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The way it is being used here seems to suggest it is "the voice of the radio station" — without being a "personality", somone like the late Terry Wogan, for example, who was a "star" and had his own programme, these people are to a large extent anonymous, and are just a "voice" that people will instantly associate with a particular radio station.
Way back in the day, on the BBC we had Alvar Liddel, who started as an 'anonymous' continuity announcer, moved up to presenting the news, and went on to become a reputed interviewer and commentator.



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Note added at 15 hrs (2018-07-08 13:50:05 GMT)
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Glad you found confirmation; it may be that this is a specifically GB term, certainly, it's the one used (even to this day) by the BBC, and very many independent companies to my knowledge.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs (2018-07-08 13:54:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Of course, it helps when you have professional experience in the broadcasting world, instead of just as a passive listener, whose understanding is perforce empirical.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs (2018-07-08 14:00:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sometimes, smaller independent radio stations (and I've seen this specifically in the States) don't always use professionall-produced commercials, but just have the normal continuity announcer read out a brief advert for a local business; in the same way as thay might say "This programme has been brought to you by Acme Laundry, the best in town!"
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 04:02
Grading comment
Thanks to all for your help.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1voice off
Robin Levey
2continuity announcer
Tony M


  

Answers


3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
voice off


Explanation:
It refers to words spoken by someone who is not themselves a part of the story that's been told. In TV (as distinct from radio, as in Asker's question) this would be called "voice off-screen (VOS)".

https://screenwriting.io/what-is-the-difference-between-v-o-...
V.O. (voice over) and O.S. (off-screen) are similar terms, but they have slightly different applications. Both are used to indicate that dialogue is spoken by someone not currently seen on the screen; the difference isn't where the speaker is not, but where the speaker is.

It's the modern equivalent of the "narrator" of classic theatre, who explained to the audience some of the context that wasn't evident on stage.

It doe not necessarily refer to "the person animating the radio show".

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 22:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you Robin, this was my second preferred option, but I found it was a bit too general in the context. Thank's for you help :-)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: 'Voice-off' is not a term really used in radio — by definition, all radio voices are 'unseen'! / Indeed... but I don't think that's quite the slant needed here, as there is no real opposition involved.
3 hrs
  -> In radio the term "voice-off" is used to refer to someone who is "off the 'sound' stage".

agree  GILOU: bien d'accord, j'ai un client qui traduit ce terme ainsi...
10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
continuity announcer


Explanation:
This is what it sounds like —the voice we are all used to hearing, yet has no actual 'personality'; the 'voice of the radio station', in a way, that makes the links between programmes, etc. Usually, in the UK, this voice would not be allowed to be used for commercials, as it would make the distinction between 'programme' and 'commercial' less clear.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2018-07-08 05:02:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The way it is being used here seems to suggest it is "the voice of the radio station" — without being a "personality", somone like the late Terry Wogan, for example, who was a "star" and had his own programme, these people are to a large extent anonymous, and are just a "voice" that people will instantly associate with a particular radio station.
Way back in the day, on the BBC we had Alvar Liddel, who started as an 'anonymous' continuity announcer, moved up to presenting the news, and went on to become a reputed interviewer and commentator.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs (2018-07-08 13:50:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Glad you found confirmation; it may be that this is a specifically GB term, certainly, it's the one used (even to this day) by the BBC, and very many independent companies to my knowledge.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs (2018-07-08 13:54:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Of course, it helps when you have professional experience in the broadcasting world, instead of just as a passive listener, whose understanding is perforce empirical.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs (2018-07-08 14:00:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sometimes, smaller independent radio stations (and I've seen this specifically in the States) don't always use professionall-produced commercials, but just have the normal continuity announcer read out a brief advert for a local business; in the same way as thay might say "This programme has been brought to you by Acme Laundry, the best in town!"

Tony M
France
Local time: 04:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 63
Grading comment
Thanks to all for your help.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you Tony, this is the answer I eventually found in a voice-off artist's CV after sifting through Google for a good while. Then checked it on Google and found a Wikipedia entry which confirms. Thanks for your help :-)

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