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mode propre de vibration

English translation: own modes of vibration

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17:18 Feb 19, 2012
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Aerospace / Aviation / Space
French term or phrase: mode propre de vibration
Aircraft engine patent.

"Si l’attache du moteur se fait par un plan passant par le centre de gravité, il est alors possible de découpler les modes propres de vibration qui sont transmis au reste de l’appareil et plus facile de les traiter pour les réduire, en utilisant des mesures connues et notamment en choisissant judicieusement les liaisons souples et leurs emplacements."

"Elle [= an additional connection] peut servir aussi à filtrer certains modes de vibration, sans introduire une flexion nuisible du moteur."

From Termium & GDT I get "vibration mode" or "mode of vibration", so maybe "natural/characteristic/inherent vibration mode". But from Linguee I get the suggestion for "modes propre de vibration" of "resonant frequency".
Mpoma
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:57
English translation:own modes of vibration
Explanation:
An oscillator's own modes of vibration (generally plural, as in the text) ARE its resonant frequencies (fundamental + harmonics), in the sense that the only characteristic of "mode" that you care about is its frequency.

What you want to avoid is having the irreducible vibration of the engine excite a resonant frequency of the airframe. That is why so much engineering goes into the engine mount.



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Note added at 15 hrs (2012-02-20 09:03:53 GMT)
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Or "eigenmodes of vibration", if you want to be fancy.:-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 days (2012-03-03 00:17:23 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

As I noted, you could say “eigenmodes” of vibration if you wanted to be fancier. Contra Chris C., the term *most commonly* used in the STEM disciplines, by far, is “normal modes” of vibration/oscillation; prove this to yourself by comparing Google verbatim exact-phrase searches on the two terms coupled with “vibration” and/or “oscillation” for context. “Eigenmodes” comes a fairly distant second, and a longish list of others (proper, characteristic, etc.) come in behind. In a patent, “normal mode” may have the disadvantage in English of being a technical term that does not look like one.

The *notion* of own/proper/characteristic/natural/normal/simple/…/eigen- modes of vibration and resonant frequencies has existed at least since the Pythagoreans. Mathematicians in the 17th and 18th centuries devoted a lot of effort to explaining the phenomenon, and Daniel Bernoulli was the first to grasp the “permanence” of the “proper frequencies”. Leonhard Euler then outshone him by showing how to derive those frequencies from the equations of motion and publishing the first mathematical theory of the vibrations of a string (De vibratione chordarum, 1748). We know that Euler himself did not popularise the term “eigenmode” (if he even used it, which is doubtful) from the simple fact that almost all his treatises were published in Latin or French. For close to two centuries thereafter, the adjectives used to identify these modes in other languages were cognates or synonyms of proprius/propre or words like “natural” or “normal”, and by and large these variants still live today. (Google Ngram searches of books in the English corpus shows the frequency of “eigenmode” rising only after 1960 – and catching up with “proper mode”, in secular decline for two centuries, only around 2000.)

The recent spreading of “eigen” terms in English amounts to propagation by analogy of a concept, rather than a term, introduced by Euler, namely (what we now call) the eigenvector. The Wikipedia article on that term puts it nicely: “[where] an abstract direction is unchanged by a given linear transformation, the prefix ‘eigen’ is used, as in eigenfunction, eigenmode, eigenface, eigenstate, and eigenfrequency.”
Selected response from:

rkillings
United States
Local time: 08:57
Grading comment
thanks very much
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5eigenmodes
chris collister
4own modes of vibrationrkillings
4(individual) modes of vibration
zosia


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
(individual) modes of vibration


Explanation:
"... it is then possible to decouple the (individual) modes of vibration."
I think the French text is just emphasizing that there are several modes of vibrations that can be decoupled from each other, but I also think this is self-explanatory, which is why I put "individual" in parenthesis. Up to you whether you want to use it or not. Good luck!

zosia
United States
Local time: 10:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in NorwegianNorwegian
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16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
eigenmodes


Explanation:
This has come up before in Proz. Just google eigenmodes for lots more info.

chris collister
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:57
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 110
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15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
modes propres de vibration
own modes of vibration


Explanation:
An oscillator's own modes of vibration (generally plural, as in the text) ARE its resonant frequencies (fundamental + harmonics), in the sense that the only characteristic of "mode" that you care about is its frequency.

What you want to avoid is having the irreducible vibration of the engine excite a resonant frequency of the airframe. That is why so much engineering goes into the engine mount.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs (2012-02-20 09:03:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Or "eigenmodes of vibration", if you want to be fancy.:-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 days (2012-03-03 00:17:23 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

As I noted, you could say “eigenmodes” of vibration if you wanted to be fancier. Contra Chris C., the term *most commonly* used in the STEM disciplines, by far, is “normal modes” of vibration/oscillation; prove this to yourself by comparing Google verbatim exact-phrase searches on the two terms coupled with “vibration” and/or “oscillation” for context. “Eigenmodes” comes a fairly distant second, and a longish list of others (proper, characteristic, etc.) come in behind. In a patent, “normal mode” may have the disadvantage in English of being a technical term that does not look like one.

The *notion* of own/proper/characteristic/natural/normal/simple/…/eigen- modes of vibration and resonant frequencies has existed at least since the Pythagoreans. Mathematicians in the 17th and 18th centuries devoted a lot of effort to explaining the phenomenon, and Daniel Bernoulli was the first to grasp the “permanence” of the “proper frequencies”. Leonhard Euler then outshone him by showing how to derive those frequencies from the equations of motion and publishing the first mathematical theory of the vibrations of a string (De vibratione chordarum, 1748). We know that Euler himself did not popularise the term “eigenmode” (if he even used it, which is doubtful) from the simple fact that almost all his treatises were published in Latin or French. For close to two centuries thereafter, the adjectives used to identify these modes in other languages were cognates or synonyms of proprius/propre or words like “natural” or “normal”, and by and large these variants still live today. (Google Ngram searches of books in the English corpus shows the frequency of “eigenmode” rising only after 1960 – and catching up with “proper mode”, in secular decline for two centuries, only around 2000.)

The recent spreading of “eigen” terms in English amounts to propagation by analogy of a concept, rather than a term, introduced by Euler, namely (what we now call) the eigenvector. The Wikipedia article on that term puts it nicely: “[where] an abstract direction is unchanged by a given linear transformation, the prefix ‘eigen’ is used, as in eigenfunction, eigenmode, eigenface, eigenstate, and eigenfrequency.”


rkillings
United States
Local time: 08:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 7
Grading comment
thanks very much
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