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tarodière

English translation: tarodière

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:taro plantation/terrace
English translation:tarodière
Entered by: Anna Kiff
Options:
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14:02 Oct 24, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Agriculture
French term or phrase: tarodière
"Lorsque James Cook découvrit la Nouvelle-Calédonie entre 1770 et 1776, il s’étonna de rencontrer un peuple autochtone doté de techniques agraires élaborées, levant de grands billons d’ignames et maîtrisant les tarodières irriguées."
Anna Kiff
Local time: 03:31
tarodière
Explanation:
Here is one explanation I have found:

HTH


Sheila


http://www.motards-online.com/blogsMO/Le Nano/8_0_Tribu-de-T...


La tarodière: c'est une plantation en terrasses irriguées par gravité de tubercules: les taros d'eau.. et ignames (tubercule sacré des kanaks, et monnaie d'échange coutumière... ainsi que nourriture de base) entourée de tabous, d'interdictions, il est difficile de les visiter, sauf celle-ci, ou le tabou n'a pas été posé (les jeunes kanaks ont enfin compris que les touristes pourraient s'interresser à leur mode de vie...). Seule la sainte vierge (chocs de cultures...) veille sur les plantations.


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Note added at 7 mins (2005-10-24 14:09:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It is translated as 'taro planation' here:

tarodière (n.f.) - taro plantation (New Caledonia)

http://www.wnc.quik.co.nz/wsmccall/Glossaires.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2005-10-24 14:10:40 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

New Caledonia
New Caledonia, a French overseas territory in the Southwest Pacific, ... Potatoes,
vegetables and maize are grown commercially while yams, taro and sweet ...
www.fao.org/WAICENT/FAOINFO/AGRICULT/AGP/AGPC/doc/Counprof/... - 44k - Còpia en memòria - Pàgines semblants


# a staple in the Hawaiian diet
www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/kona/historyg.htm

# tropical plant (Colocasia esculenta) of the arum family with tuberous root used as food, especially in the Pacific islands
www.georgeortiz.com/TEXT/ethnography.htm

# A potato with a thick, hairy skin. Often called albi. Used in making taro or albi plaster, to draw toxins from the body
www.goodhealthinfo.net/mdr/glossary.htm

# edible starchy tuberous root of taro plants
# herb of the Pacific islands grown throughout the tropics for its edible root and in temperate areas as an ornamental for its large glossy leaves
wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn

# Taro (from Tahitian), more rarely kalo (from Hawaiian), is a tropical plant grown primarily as a root vegetable for its edible corm, and secondarily as a leaf vegetable. Its flowers are more rarely eaten. Taro is closely related to elephant ear and Caladium, plants commonly grown as ornamental plants. The genus Colocasia contains about 8 species distributed throughout Polynesia and Indo-Malaysia (Wagner, Herbst, and Sohmer, 1999).
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taro

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2005-10-24 14:13:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

New Caledonia was settled by successive waves of migration dating back as far as 4000 BC. The land was divided between distinct communities, each with their own language. ***These Kanak tribes practised a sophisticated form of taro farming using irrigated, contoured terraces.***

http://abcasiapacific.com/news/countries/NEWCALEDONIA.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 51 mins (2005-10-24 14:53:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Taro requires saturated or continually humid conditions for growth, which with the seasonal and irregular rainfall patterns of New Caledonia makes irrigation essential. Legend records that the technique of irrigated taro cultivation was brought long ago by foreigners who made many mistakes at first, but the numerous traces of terraces still visible today all over the island show the extent to which the art was developed and perfected locally. Water was captured high up on permanent streams and conveyed through canals, often over several kilometres, to slopes where terraces could be constructed. Aqueducts were used to cross depressions, hollowed trees were used to bridge gullies, and special overflows protected against damage in heavy rains. Terraces generally 2 to 6 metres wide were carved out of slopes up to 80 percent, with an outer wall sometimes reinforced with stones or logs. Stone-lined spillways and sluice-gates directed the water from one terrace to another, and permitted precise control of water flow, but the systems required constant surveillance and maintenance. The hydraulic works were protected by a code of prohibitions and taboos, but earthworms were a significant cause of leaks. Plantings along the banks had both magical and practical significance in stabilization and erosion control. Some heads of valleys became great amphitheatres of taro terraces, and terraces were also developed along streams, and in low swampy areas where the taro was planted in raised beds. Similar types of irrigated taro cultivation occurred where conditions were appropriate throughout Melanesia and Polynesia, and are still practised in some parts of Vanuatu.

Both yams and taros are maintained as vegetatively reproduced clones. Many varieties were imported at different times, and others were probably generated spontaneously in gardens long left in fallow. The result was a large number of varieties adapted to different culture conditions and harvest times, which were grown in different gardens and even different parts of a terrace or mound. A small village could maintain 20 or more varieties of an important crop plant. There was an obvious awareness of the importance of these varieties, and new forms were sought out and tried. While various lists or descriptions of these varieties have been made, the precise conditions for which they were adapted have seldom been noted, nor has there been a comparable effort to preserve the varieties themselves, and with the decline in subsistence agriculture and the collapse of irrigated taro cultivation, a large part of this valuable genetic resource base has probably been lost.


http://islands.unep.ch/sieme1.htm
Selected response from:

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 03:31
Grading comment
Thanks again for all the research.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +7tarodière
Sheila Hardie
3terraced crop
xxxPFB
2 +1rows of taro
Jonathan MacKerron
2furrows
suezen


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
tarodiиre
furrows


Explanation:

from the picture on this link, it's what they appear to be www.wallis.co.nc/philatelie/faune et flore.html - 36k

It seems to fit anyway
www.dpi.qld.gov.au/rerc/13375.html - 45k

Today most of taro cultivation in New Caledonia is on the wetter eastern side where
... The furrows between the beds serve for irrigation and for drainage. ...
www.fao.org/DOCREP/005/AC450E/ac450e08.htm - 83k

Also, in agriculture, a tarière is used to dig holes or furrows

suezen
Local time: 03:31
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 55
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
tarodière
rows of taro


Explanation:
taro=the rootstock of the taro plant that serves as a food staple in the tropics

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 31 mins (2005-10-24 14:33:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or here perhaps simply "taro plants"

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mariam Osmann: irrigated taro farms > http://www.fao.org/documents/show_cdr.asp?url_file=/docrep/0...
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
tarodière
tarodière


Explanation:
Here is one explanation I have found:

HTH


Sheila


http://www.motards-online.com/blogsMO/Le Nano/8_0_Tribu-de-T...


La tarodière: c'est une plantation en terrasses irriguées par gravité de tubercules: les taros d'eau.. et ignames (tubercule sacré des kanaks, et monnaie d'échange coutumière... ainsi que nourriture de base) entourée de tabous, d'interdictions, il est difficile de les visiter, sauf celle-ci, ou le tabou n'a pas été posé (les jeunes kanaks ont enfin compris que les touristes pourraient s'interresser à leur mode de vie...). Seule la sainte vierge (chocs de cultures...) veille sur les plantations.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 mins (2005-10-24 14:09:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It is translated as 'taro planation' here:

tarodière (n.f.) - taro plantation (New Caledonia)

http://www.wnc.quik.co.nz/wsmccall/Glossaires.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2005-10-24 14:10:40 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

New Caledonia
New Caledonia, a French overseas territory in the Southwest Pacific, ... Potatoes,
vegetables and maize are grown commercially while yams, taro and sweet ...
www.fao.org/WAICENT/FAOINFO/AGRICULT/AGP/AGPC/doc/Counprof/... - 44k - Còpia en memòria - Pàgines semblants


# a staple in the Hawaiian diet
www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/kona/historyg.htm

# tropical plant (Colocasia esculenta) of the arum family with tuberous root used as food, especially in the Pacific islands
www.georgeortiz.com/TEXT/ethnography.htm

# A potato with a thick, hairy skin. Often called albi. Used in making taro or albi plaster, to draw toxins from the body
www.goodhealthinfo.net/mdr/glossary.htm

# edible starchy tuberous root of taro plants
# herb of the Pacific islands grown throughout the tropics for its edible root and in temperate areas as an ornamental for its large glossy leaves
wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn

# Taro (from Tahitian), more rarely kalo (from Hawaiian), is a tropical plant grown primarily as a root vegetable for its edible corm, and secondarily as a leaf vegetable. Its flowers are more rarely eaten. Taro is closely related to elephant ear and Caladium, plants commonly grown as ornamental plants. The genus Colocasia contains about 8 species distributed throughout Polynesia and Indo-Malaysia (Wagner, Herbst, and Sohmer, 1999).
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taro

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2005-10-24 14:13:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

New Caledonia was settled by successive waves of migration dating back as far as 4000 BC. The land was divided between distinct communities, each with their own language. ***These Kanak tribes practised a sophisticated form of taro farming using irrigated, contoured terraces.***

http://abcasiapacific.com/news/countries/NEWCALEDONIA.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 51 mins (2005-10-24 14:53:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Taro requires saturated or continually humid conditions for growth, which with the seasonal and irregular rainfall patterns of New Caledonia makes irrigation essential. Legend records that the technique of irrigated taro cultivation was brought long ago by foreigners who made many mistakes at first, but the numerous traces of terraces still visible today all over the island show the extent to which the art was developed and perfected locally. Water was captured high up on permanent streams and conveyed through canals, often over several kilometres, to slopes where terraces could be constructed. Aqueducts were used to cross depressions, hollowed trees were used to bridge gullies, and special overflows protected against damage in heavy rains. Terraces generally 2 to 6 metres wide were carved out of slopes up to 80 percent, with an outer wall sometimes reinforced with stones or logs. Stone-lined spillways and sluice-gates directed the water from one terrace to another, and permitted precise control of water flow, but the systems required constant surveillance and maintenance. The hydraulic works were protected by a code of prohibitions and taboos, but earthworms were a significant cause of leaks. Plantings along the banks had both magical and practical significance in stabilization and erosion control. Some heads of valleys became great amphitheatres of taro terraces, and terraces were also developed along streams, and in low swampy areas where the taro was planted in raised beds. Similar types of irrigated taro cultivation occurred where conditions were appropriate throughout Melanesia and Polynesia, and are still practised in some parts of Vanuatu.

Both yams and taros are maintained as vegetatively reproduced clones. Many varieties were imported at different times, and others were probably generated spontaneously in gardens long left in fallow. The result was a large number of varieties adapted to different culture conditions and harvest times, which were grown in different gardens and even different parts of a terrace or mound. A small village could maintain 20 or more varieties of an important crop plant. There was an obvious awareness of the importance of these varieties, and new forms were sought out and tried. While various lists or descriptions of these varieties have been made, the precise conditions for which they were adapted have seldom been noted, nor has there been a comparable effort to preserve the varieties themselves, and with the decline in subsistence agriculture and the collapse of irrigated taro cultivation, a large part of this valuable genetic resource base has probably been lost.


http://islands.unep.ch/sieme1.htm

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 03:31
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 27
Grading comment
Thanks again for all the research.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  suezen: yes, taro plantation seems very likely, I agree
10 mins
  -> thanks, suezen:-)

agree  Kate Hudson
23 mins
  -> thanks, Kate:-)

agree  Nick Lingris: "Irrigated taro fields" on the web and in the Britannica.
27 mins
  -> thanks, Nick:-)

agree  sporran
3 hrs

agree  xxxPFB: with "tarodière" but any other tr. or footnote must include the fact that taraudières aren't flat fields but a terraced way of growing plants. Also a mistake to think only taro is grown: other plants are as well.
3 hrs

agree  Rachel Fell: taro terraces - http://www.css.cornell.edu/courses/190/abstr/root.htm
5 hrs

agree  Mariam Osmann: irrigated taro farms >>> http://www.fao.org/documents/show_cdr.asp?url_file=/docrep/0...
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
tarodière
terraced crop


Explanation:
.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs 10 mins (2005-10-24 21:13:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

La tarodière: c'est une plantation en terrasses irriguées par gravité de ...
La vue depuis la tarodière de l'ancienne tribu évoque la signification canaque ...
www.motards-online.com/blogsMO/ Le%20Nano/8_0_Tribu-de-Tiaty.html - 11k - 22 oct 2005

xxxPFB
Local time: 03:31
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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