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anastylose

English translation: anastylosis

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:anastylose
English translation:anastylosis
Entered by: Meri Buettner
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17:43 May 24, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
Archaeology / Archaeology
French term or phrase: anastylose
Certaines restitutions, reconstructions, remontages ou anastyloses devront être reconsidérées afin d'assurer une meilleure qualité archéologique.

This is about restoring archaeological and historic sites in Lebanon...
Meri Buettner
France
Local time: 03:44
anastylosis
Explanation:
A description of the term can be found in:
http://www.trp.dundee.ac.uk/research/glossary/anastylo.html

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Note added at 2003-05-24 17:53:27 (GMT)
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Other references:

http://www.uni-tuebingen.de/troia/st/four/ab/english/ab4eng....

http://www.csmonitor.com/2002/1108/p07s01-wosc.htm

http://www.theangkorguide.com/text/part-one/chapter_11.htm

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Note added at 2003-05-24 17:55:21 (GMT)
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A very nice description in French (from http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anastylose):

Anastylose
Un article de Wikipédia, l\'encyclopédie libre.

L\'anastylose est un terme archéologique qui désigne la technique de reconstruction d\'un monument en ruine grâce à l\'étude méthodique de l\'ajustement des différents éléments qui composent son architecture.

Quand des éléments sont manquants, on peut avoir recours à des ajouts d\'éléments modernes (ciment, plâtre, résine...)

L\'anastylose a bien des détracteurs dans le milieu scientifique. En effet elle pose un certain nombre de problèmes:

Quelle que rigoureuse que soit l\'étude préalable à l\'anastylose, une erreur d\'interprétation peut mener à reconstituer le monument d\'une manière erronée.
Les dégâts éventuels (souvent minimes) que peuvent subir les éléments durant l\'assemblage.
Le fait qu\'un même élément puisse avoir été utilisé dans différents monuments à différentes périodes. Utiliser cet élément dans une construction, c\'est nier les autres.
Exemple d\'anastylose:

La restauration du complexe funéraire du roi Djoser par Jean-Philippe Lauer (Saqqarah)
La chapelle rouge (Karnak)

Selected response from:

Ramon Somoza
Spain
Local time: 03:44
Grading comment
Thanks for the help! Ended up "fudging" with ...re-erections or reconstructions using anastylosis...
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2anastylosis
Ramon Somoza
1Ramon's got the right "English" word, "anastylosis",
Christopher Crockett


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
anastylosis


Explanation:
A description of the term can be found in:
http://www.trp.dundee.ac.uk/research/glossary/anastylo.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-24 17:53:27 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Other references:

http://www.uni-tuebingen.de/troia/st/four/ab/english/ab4eng....

http://www.csmonitor.com/2002/1108/p07s01-wosc.htm

http://www.theangkorguide.com/text/part-one/chapter_11.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-24 17:55:21 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A very nice description in French (from http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anastylose):

Anastylose
Un article de Wikipédia, l\'encyclopédie libre.

L\'anastylose est un terme archéologique qui désigne la technique de reconstruction d\'un monument en ruine grâce à l\'étude méthodique de l\'ajustement des différents éléments qui composent son architecture.

Quand des éléments sont manquants, on peut avoir recours à des ajouts d\'éléments modernes (ciment, plâtre, résine...)

L\'anastylose a bien des détracteurs dans le milieu scientifique. En effet elle pose un certain nombre de problèmes:

Quelle que rigoureuse que soit l\'étude préalable à l\'anastylose, une erreur d\'interprétation peut mener à reconstituer le monument d\'une manière erronée.
Les dégâts éventuels (souvent minimes) que peuvent subir les éléments durant l\'assemblage.
Le fait qu\'un même élément puisse avoir été utilisé dans différents monuments à différentes périodes. Utiliser cet élément dans une construction, c\'est nier les autres.
Exemple d\'anastylose:

La restauration du complexe funéraire du roi Djoser par Jean-Philippe Lauer (Saqqarah)
La chapelle rouge (Karnak)



Ramon Somoza
Spain
Local time: 03:44
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks for the help! Ended up "fudging" with ...re-erections or reconstructions using anastylosis...

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Florence B
3 mins
  -> Merci, Oddie

agree  Christopher Crockett: Yes, though the distinction between this method and "restitutions, reconstructions, remontages" is not clear to me. Perhaps you could fudge a bit with "an anastylitic reconstruction" ?
13 mins
  -> Thank you, Christopher.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

47 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
Ramon's got the right "English" word, "anastylosis",


Explanation:
which appears in several recent unabridged dictionaries (though not in the latest edition of the O.E.D.).
But, what's the distinction being made here between these terms, "restitutions, reconstructions, remontages ou anastyloses" ?

On a guess, I'd say that a "restitution" *might* be any sort of [English] "reconstruction" --i.e., there *may* or may *not* be anything actually left of the structure which can be used in the rebuilding of the thing (picture the "restitution" of a "Woodhenge", a circular arraignment of large *wooden* posts, rather than the *stone* ones used in a "Stonehenge"; there's no wood left, only the holes the posts sat in).

A "reconstruction", otOh, might be what we would call a "reconstruction", i.e., the monument survives, but is in pieces, which simply need to be "reconstructed."

How the latter differs from a "remontage" is beyond me --maybe it's just a question of "remounting" some few of the parts, rather than something much more extensive(?).

OtOh, "anastyloses" is your basic six-bit word, imitation Greek, technical jargon for a *much* more extensive operation, involving "the restauration of a ruined monument or building by re-assembling fallen parts and, when necessary *incorporating new materials*." [Random House, emphesis mine]

It's certainly a very technical term and what form you use depends upon the construction of your sentence in translation.

How about : "Various options concerning the reconstruction, restauration, rebuilding or [full-scale] anastylitic reconstruction must be taken into account in order to be assured of the best and most accurate archaeolgical work." ?

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Note added at 2003-05-24 18:48:15 (GMT) Post-grading
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What\'s the *RUSH* ?

If your text is a \"scientifique\" one, then these distinctions are there for a purpose and would have specific meanings to the \"archéologues\" who read it.

\"Reconstruction\" is, in essence, a *mental* exercise, which may or may not involve the use of any material bits surviving from the site.
A \"reconstruction\" can be a drawing or a model, showing the monument as it once was, imagined according to both the existing evidence and, if necessary, whatever can be gleaned from similar or analogous monuments to \"reconstruct\" the parts which might be gone without a trace (eg., the roof is missing here, but we know what a roof on a similar building looked like from, say, a surviving painting).

\"Restoration\" [note my mispelling above] involves *physically* \"restoring\" the monument, according to the \"reconstruction\" of it. This can be just a matter of replacing a few stones, a bit of decoration, or whatever; or it can be quite extensive.
In the 19th century Viollet-le-Duc and his collegues \"restored\" a great many medieval buildings in France (St. Denis, Paris cathedral, Vézelay) quite extensively, and all according to a \"reconstruction\" of what they *thought* the original might --or even *should*-- have looked like. And, in the main, that \"reconstruction\" of theirs is at considerable odds to the way late 20th c. archeologists believe those monuments looked.

\"Rebuilding\", strictly speaking, just means putting the parts back together, a relatively simple matter --although certainly open to errors.

An \"anastylitic reconstruction\" would be the most \"scientifique\" of the lot, involving a carefully made [mental] \"reconstruction\", *and* the use of all of the surviving material elements, *and* the use of purpose-made new materials to take the place of those elements which are missing.

Christopher Crockett
Local time: 21:44
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 131
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