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porte charretière

English translation: carriage door

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08:31 Jun 17, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Architecture
French term or phrase: porte charretière
L’étable se satisfait d’une porte et d’une baie d’aération, la grange d’une porte charretière.
MSH
Local time: 10:42
English translation:carriage door
Explanation:
http://www.carriagedoor.com/

There are heavy wooden doors - Our grange in our house in France has them

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Note added at 12 mins (2005-06-17 08:43:09 GMT)
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http://www.dallasdoors.com/carriage.html - more illustrations on this site
Selected response from:

Kate Hudson
Netherlands
Local time: 11:42
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +2carriage door
Kate Hudson
3 +1barn door
Tony M
2cart or haywagon doorsfranglish


  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
carriage door


Explanation:
http://www.carriagedoor.com/

There are heavy wooden doors - Our grange in our house in France has them

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2005-06-17 08:43:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.dallasdoors.com/carriage.html - more illustrations on this site

Kate Hudson
Netherlands
Local time: 11:42
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Surely if this is a barn, it's more likely to be a door for a 'charette' (hay wain) than a carriage?
1 min
  -> Depends on how classy the 'grange' in this particular instance is .... And yes otherwise they are barn doors

agree  Christopher Crockett: Yes, it looks like the stable has a more or less normal door and a "bay" for the horse, while the barn has a large, double valved carriage door.
6 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  emiledgar: Yes, regardless of the qualityof hte vehicle kept in the barn, porte charretiere evokes carriage door.
7 hrs
  -> Thanks
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
cart or haywagon doors


Explanation:
just some ideas

franglish
Switzerland
Local time: 11:42
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
barn door


Explanation:
Well, I'm not aware of a specific term in English, but as far as I know it's just called a 'barn door' --- the sort of high, wide, double doors that are big enough to drive a high-piled laden hay wain through; the French kind often have an odd cutout spanning the two that creates a little door for people to go through, rather different from the way it is done with modern, metal doors.

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Note added at 23 days (2005-07-10 11:42:35 GMT) Post-grading
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I really feel that the correct term here was \'barn door\'; the French are quite usually specific about the terms they use, and if this is a \'grange\' (please note, this is a farm \'barn\' and has nothing to do with the idea of \'grange\' as used in English for sometimes quite \'posh\' houses), then it is a door intended to admit a \'charrette\' or hay-wain --- piled high with hay after the haymaking, of course! Such doors have specific dimensions suitable for this purpose.

Had this been a door for a coach or carriage, it would have been attached to a \'caoch-house\' (for which there is a distinct word in FR), and the dimensions are unlikely to be the same (givent hat carriages or even coaches are not as tall as haywains!).

So I really think you ought to stick to the accuracy of the FR term, and not assume the writer id being sloppy, nor make judgements about the status of the \'barn\' in question.

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Note added at 23 days (2005-07-10 11:46:22 GMT) Post-grading
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Note the following definitions of \'grange\' from OED -- and note that the first meaning is noted as \'archaic\'!

GRANGE:

1 A granary, a barn. arch. ME.

2 A farm; esp. a country house with farm-buildings attached. ME.
2b Hist. An outlying farmstead with tithe-barns etc. belonging to a monastery or feudal lord. LME.

3 A country house (for recreation). Now only in house names. M16.


* * * *

Sorry about the typos!

COACH house
GIVEN THAT...
IS being...



Tony M
France
Local time: 11:42
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 120

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jennifer White: yes, I'd go with that
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Jennifer!
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