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sous le porche d'une église romaine

English translation: under the porch of a Romanesque church

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:sous le porche d'une église romane/romaine
English translation:under the porch of a Romanesque church
Entered by: marie bullard a
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10:37 Aug 16, 2010
French to English translations [PRO]
Architecture / sous le porche d'une église romaine
French term or phrase: sous le porche d'une église romaine
medieval church terminology please !
marie bullard a
Local time: 15:59
under the porch of a Romanesque church
Explanation:
I think you'll find that this refers to an architectural style rather than a branch of Christianity

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Note added at 48 mins (2010-08-16 11:26:04 GMT)
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good blog: http://namiinteriors.blogspot.com/2009/06/fourth-entry-byzan...

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Note added at 1 hr (2010-08-16 12:10:54 GMT)
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loads of ghit images from google France with churches being romaine and not the, correct, romane.
Selected response from:

Melzie
Local time: 15:59
Grading comment
thank you !
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +8under the porch of a Romanesque churchMelzie
Summary of reference entries provided
same word in French and English
writeaway
"romanesque" church porches
Christopher Crockett

Discussion entries: 15





  

Answers


44 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
under the porch of a Romanesque church


Explanation:
I think you'll find that this refers to an architectural style rather than a branch of Christianity

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 48 mins (2010-08-16 11:26:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

good blog: http://namiinteriors.blogspot.com/2009/06/fourth-entry-byzan...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2010-08-16 12:10:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

loads of ghit images from google France with churches being romaine and not the, correct, romane.

Melzie
Local time: 15:59
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
thank you !

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  writeaway: backing a good answer with refs is always helpful to asker and to peers. if an answer is correct, there are no problems in finding solid refs to prove the point-or there is no problem for an asker to explain it.
8 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  Melissa McMahon: I think this is most likely right, though Romanesque in French is "romane" rather than "romaine"/Yep, agree
20 mins
  -> Thank you. I've done a lot of this stuff and writers make more mistakes in French that they think. The correct answer will be in the context, as writeaway 16, oeuf course!

agree  InfoMarex: Yes - agree
54 mins

agree  Joyce A: Yes, with "romaine" a misprint for "romane."
57 mins

agree  xxxBourth: Have slept under a great many of these in my time. In France there are not many churches other than RC ones! Even Reformed (Protestant) ones are known as temples.
1 hr

agree  mimi 254
1 hr

agree  Gilla Evans: it has to be really, since Roman would only make sense if it had been built in Roman times, not in medieval times...
1 hr

agree  Christopher Crockett: Joyce A. is most likely correct --it's question of an "église romane" rather than an "église romaine." Unless, of course, the source is talking about a "Roman church" (i.e., a medieval church literally in the city of Rome).
1 hr
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Reference comments


8 mins peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: same word in French and English

Reference information:
porch.
1. Covered place of entrance and exit attached to a building and projecting in front of its main mass, such as the south porch of a medieval church, often with a room over it.
http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O1-porch.html

and here's a picture:
http://www.hargravefineart.co.uk/joseph-nash-porch-medieval-...

writeaway
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Christopher Crockett: Though I wouldn't call the feature depicted in the Nash painting a "porch" --unless I had Poetic License, of course.
1 day1 hr
  -> one of the two of us is the expert here and I know it's not me..... ;-)
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5 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: "romanesque" church porches

Reference information:
O.k., 'romane' rather than 'romaine' --a common enough mistake, among those not completely familiar with the literature. 'Romanesque,' not 'Roman' (nor even 'roman').

Church porches (romane or not) were thought of --and used-- as semi-public spaces, since they were part of the church but not actually *within* the church proper.

Ecclesiastical judicial proceedings (like some trials 'by ordeal') could be held there.

Documents (charters) were 'published' --i.e., read to the public aloud-- there. Marriage 'bans' and other statements of public interest were (at least later, and even today) posted there.

Etc.

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Note added at 5 hrs (2010-08-16 16:13:33 GMT)
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Sorry, this was intended to be a Discussion Comment, not a Reference Comment.

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Note added at 1 day2 hrs (2010-08-17 13:07:44 GMT)
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Writeaway has the definition, though I wouldn't call the architectural feature a "porch" --unless I had Artistic License, of course. Nash's subject is simply a deeply splayed portal.

A "porch" is rather more substantial, as the definition suggests --a place where you can really get in out of the rain, crash in (a la Bourth), or even use for public functions.

Here's a famous "porch" at Chartres cathedral

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cathedrale_nd_chartre...

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:North_porch_of_Ca...

built *in front of* the [deeply splayed] portals.

Here's a more modest example, from Moissac:

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Moissac_facade_SaintP...

the porch protecting its famous sculpted tympanum

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Abadia_de_Saint-Pierre_de_...

There is also the phenomenon of "clocher porche"s, which developed out of the very substantial "Westwerk" masses in Carolingian/Ottonian architecture of the 9th -10th cc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westwork

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a5/Corvey_We...

which developed, in France, into something like this

http://vdujardin.over-blog.com/article-tours-4-l-abbaye-sain...

The "rooms" above the porch were often important chapels, usually with openings in their west wall which looked into the nave of the church.

But not always.

Here's the "clocher porche" at Fleury (St. Benoit-s-Loire), which has two stories of open halls, filled with columns with historiated capitals (mid-11th c., among the earliest examples of true "Romanesque" sculpture):

http://www.bernardrobert.fr/saint-benoit-sur-loire/
(4th pic down, and subsequent)

Christopher Crockett
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 79

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  writeaway
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, writea.
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Changes made by editors
Aug 20, 2010 - Changes made by marie bullard a:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/1281121">marie bullard a's</a> old entry - "sous le porche d\'une église romane" » "under the porch of a Romanesque church"
Aug 18, 2010 - Changes made by marie bullard a:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/1281121">marie bullard a's</a> old entry - "sous le porche d\'une église romaine" » "under the porch of a Romanesque church"


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