tirage d’art

English translation: A special, limited edition, enhanced by the artist

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:tirage d’art
English translation:A special, limited edition, enhanced by the artist
Entered by: Christopher Crockett

16:51 Apr 8, 2005
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Art, Arts & Crafts, Painting
French term or phrase: tirage d’art
Numérotées de 1 à 98 et de I à XXX pour les épreuves d’artistes, les lithographies originales de (nom de l(artiste) sont aussi disponibles en tirage d’art, sur demande, entièrement retouchées par l’artiste à la gouache et à l’acrylique, numérotées de 1 à 8.

Artistic printing/edition ???
Nancy Bonnefond
France
Local time: 09:11
a special, limited edition
Explanation:
Jane's certainty aside, it looks to me that there is something more involved here than simple "prints".

The most likely sense is :

"The original lithographs of XX are also avialable, on demand, in a special, limited edition (numbered 1 to 8), which has additional colors added in watercolor and acrylic."

Clearly, this is something different from just the ordinary "prints" available to the hoi and the poloi.

"sur demand" implies some kind of special order, it seems to me.

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Note added at 28 mins (2005-04-08 17:20:23 GMT)
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Dylan has the right idea.

I\'d split the difference and go with \"A Special, Artist\'s Limited Edition\" --in the same way that you have a \"Director\'s Cut\" in cinema.

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Note added at 29 mins (2005-04-08 17:21:00 GMT)
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or : \"A de Luxe Artist\'s Limited Edition\"

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Note added at 1 hr 26 mins (2005-04-08 18:18:11 GMT)
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O.k., we\'ve got *two* (2) different and distinct \"editions\", both of which are limited and numbered (in practice, *every* edition is \"limited\", but forget that obvious fact for now) :

1) The \"épreuves d’artistes\" (\"artist\'s proofs\") of the original lithographs, numbered 1 to 98 and I to XXX

2) The \"tirage d’art\" (\"de Luxe Artist\'s Edition\") in which the original lithographs have been \"enhanced\" (\"retouchées\") by the artist himself with additions in watercolor and acrylics, numbered 1 to 8, and are available by Special Order.

If you have the stomach for it, here\'s an American \"Christian expressionist\" painter who\'s making a fortune selling both his cheap prints and his \"enhanced\" \"paintings\", which are actually just prints which he has \"touched up\" with some \"hand-done\" highlights :

http://www.thomaskinkade.com/magi/servlet/com.asucon.ebiz.ho...

http://www.thomaskinkade.com/magi/servlet/com.asucon.ebiz.ca...

Argggg....



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Note added at 2 hrs 8 mins (2005-04-08 18:59:57 GMT)
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The larger edition, \"Numérotées de 1 à 98 et de I à XXX pour les épreuves d’artistes\", will be, I believe, \"proofs\" or \"exemplars\" pulled from the stone under the direction of the artist --not \"approved by the artist\" as Jane seems to be suggesting (perhaps I\'m reading her wrong, however).

In any event, it is definitely a high-quality edition, and calling it one made up of \"artist\'s proofs\" may be a bit too negative in English, since \"proof\" generally, has the sense of a \"pull\" which is a transitory \"state\" of the print.

Typically, the artist would work on his plate (or stone), pull a proof, then work on the plate again, pull another proof, etc., the sucessive pulls giving him a chance to see what the end product will look like as it nears \"completion\".

Each of these \"proofs\" would correspond to what the art hysterians call a \"state\" of the print. The various \"states\" themselves are highly prized and collectable, since they give us a detailed isight into the working processes of the artist.

At some point the artist gets his work down to a place that he\'s happy with and stops working on the plate. (And knowing when to stop mucking about with the plate is definitely an importat part of being a good printmaker.)

But it seems clear to me that all 128 copies of this \"artist\'s proof\" edition will be, virtually, the same, pulled from the same, completed and unaltered plate from the beginning of the \"run\" to the end.

The final eight prints of the other edition will (probably) be pulled from that same plate (in the same state) and will be identical to the first edition before the watercolor/acrylic \"enhancements\" are applied by the artist\'s own precious hand.

As opposed to lithography, in the engraving technique --where the prints are pulled from a metal plate (usually copper)-- there is a slight, but noticable, deterioriation in the quality of each sucessive print that is pulled, since the ink roller and paper actually abraid the metal, ever so slightly.

True connoisseurs of engravings are *very* picky folks and they really *like* those early pulls, for such things as the little, slightly rough edges to the lines which are caused by the \"burr\" which the burin has made when the lines are scratched in the plate.

(Print connoisseurs are very \"sensuous\" folk.)

In a lithograph, however, there wouldn\'t be any deterioration of the print quality from one pull to the next at all, I believe --and the first of a series would be identical in quality and appearance to the 100th (except, perhaps, for variations in the ink colors).
Selected response from:

Christopher Crockett
Local time: 03:11
Grading comment
special artist's edition upon request, entirely enhanced by... No need to add "unlimited" since it's explicit that they're numbered from 1 to 8. Thanks a lot to all! Très bonnes explications.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4a special, limited edition
Christopher Crockett
5prints
Jane Lamb-Ruiz
3 +2fine art print
suezen
4 +1artist's print
Dylan Edwards


  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
tirage d’art
artist's print


Explanation:
or perhaps artist's proof

What is an artist's print? Printing is a craft and an art-form in itself, and is quite distinct from ... An artist's print is hand-made by the artist. ...
www.dace.co.uk/prints.htm

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Note added at 19 mins (2005-04-08 17:11:26 GMT)
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The examples I\'ve seen in French indicate that it\'s a limited-edition print made by the artist or under the artist\'s supervision.

*Tirage d\'art: Il s\'agit d\'un tirage effectué par l\'auteur ou sous son contrôle,
dans la limite de 30 exemplaires par photographie originale, ...
patrickdieudonne.com/catalog/index.php

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Note added at 31 mins (2005-04-08 17:23:03 GMT)
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Just to add that I\'m going in the direction of Christopher\'s answer, because \"tirage\" means the prints collectively.

Dylan Edwards
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: A good idea. I'm thinking that "tirage" is best translated here as "edition", since it is a question of a special "pull", which is to be enhanced by the artist himself.
8 mins
  -> Thanks. My emphasis was on the fact that the artist plays a part... You're right, "tirage" is a set of prints, an edition.
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45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
tirage d’art
fine art print


Explanation:
another possibility
What is the difference between a fine art print and a reproduction?
A fine art print is a "multiple original" made by hand, one impression at a time, from a plate (usually copper or zinc) etched by the artist.
Production methods that do not involve the artist, inevitably degrade the value of the print. Despite good quality printers and up-to-date technology used to produce giclees or iris prints, the result will never be as good. Moreover, there is no physical basis for any limit in the number of possible impressions (usually printed by the thousands), though edition size may be artificially limited to support a price desired by the publisher.
With original fine art prints, the tactile quality of the ink on paper and the printing style, are inseparable parts of the artwork
www.monoprints.com/prints/selecting.html

suezen
Local time: 09:11
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 91

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: yes a fine art print...which is limited..but the text does not go into that...so..fine art print or numbered print
55 mins
  -> thanks Jane :-)

agree  Dr Sue Levy: fine art print... retouched by the artist and numbered...
3 hrs
  -> thanks Sue
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
tirage d’art
prints


Explanation:
just prints...or print reproductions..no art in English...

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Note added at 4 mins (2005-04-08 16:56:09 GMT)
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In other words, you can buy the original lithograph..or a print of it.

Of course, you\'ll probably get answers with art or artistic. It would not be germane in this context, IMO.

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Note added at 1 hr 10 mins (2005-04-08 18:02:36 GMT)
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numbered prints

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Note added at 1 hr 40 mins (2005-04-08 18:32:04 GMT)
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Limited Edition Signed and Numbered Lithographic Prints
By Rick Broome Studios
Copyright 1954-2004 Rick Broome Studios & Rick Broome Productions
All Rights Reserved

Trust Account: What is it?
Notes from our Publisher




A Limited Edition Signed and **Numbered Print*** is a published reproduction of an original painting. These reproductions are published on the most modern printing press using specially manufactured expensive “archival” paper expressly for the purpose of producing excellent color reproductions. In order for the paper to be considered “archival” it must be 100 percent “rag content” fiber as well as have neutral pH balance. This expensive paper is similar to money only you don’t see the fibers. Newsprint is at the opposite end of the table. If you put a newspaper in the sun it will turn yellow in a matter of days. This change in color is caused by the acid in newsprint; a form of corrosion similar to how cheap iron changes from metal to rust. The purpose of producing fine art prints on archival paper is so that the reproduction will stand the test of time.

To produce a limited edition signed and **numbered print** the artist, publisher, or designated owner of the actual original painting from which the derivatives are produced has chosen to make a “Limited” number of these fine art paper print reproductions because they are much more valuable than either an “open edition” or common poster. This limitation is deliberately chosen to be a certain number of “Editions.”

Upon completion of the print publication the artist who created the original painting from which these reproductions are published has personally “Signed” each individual print. The artist’s signature indicates that that the original artist has approved and signed each individual print for quality and guarantees the standards to which the artist demands. Not only has the artist individually inspected and approved each specific reproduction, but also the artist is representing that the published paper print is as a faithful, good, and quality of a reproduction as the artist can achieve from the original work of art that the artist created.

The greater the artist’s qualifications the greater the value of the artists original paintings as well as the highest quality published reproductions. Therefore, the mass produced lithographic print reproductions have been not only limited to a specific and pre-designated number of prints, but also have been “Numbered” by the artist in a predetermined numeric sequence.

If the lithographs are limited to 405 printed reproductions there will be 405 closely matched individual “impressions” of the original painting numbered from 001 to 405. The last print in the edition is numbered 405/405. The word “Print” is used to indicate that the published edition is a reproduced copy and not an original work of art. The term “lithographic – or lithograph” became popular because the first prints were graphic mass produced copies. This term has been used for many centuries and evolved into what is commonly known in the printing press industry as a “litho.”



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 45 mins (2005-04-08 18:37:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A numbered print is not necessarily limited according to the above....limited means they will never, ever make prints of it again in this way. The text does not say that. It does say, fine art print numbered x to y...

So, I apologize for that.

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 89

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kelvin Wu: Yes, just "prints" plain and simple.
22 mins

neutral  Christopher Crockett: Clearly, not the ordinary "prints" or lithographs, but something quite special.
23 mins
  -> Technically, a fine art print...but in this context that is obvious since he is working on them himself in the same sentence. he wouldn't be working on pictures of them that are made into prints or whatever.

disagree  David Vaughn: This is NOT just a print.
1 hr
  -> I would think in the sentence the way it is written, it is obvious it is a print of high quality that the artist has approved...numbered print...when numbered, I believe it is obvious..
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
tirage d’art
a special, limited edition


Explanation:
Jane's certainty aside, it looks to me that there is something more involved here than simple "prints".

The most likely sense is :

"The original lithographs of XX are also avialable, on demand, in a special, limited edition (numbered 1 to 8), which has additional colors added in watercolor and acrylic."

Clearly, this is something different from just the ordinary "prints" available to the hoi and the poloi.

"sur demand" implies some kind of special order, it seems to me.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 28 mins (2005-04-08 17:20:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Dylan has the right idea.

I\'d split the difference and go with \"A Special, Artist\'s Limited Edition\" --in the same way that you have a \"Director\'s Cut\" in cinema.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 29 mins (2005-04-08 17:21:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or : \"A de Luxe Artist\'s Limited Edition\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 26 mins (2005-04-08 18:18:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

O.k., we\'ve got *two* (2) different and distinct \"editions\", both of which are limited and numbered (in practice, *every* edition is \"limited\", but forget that obvious fact for now) :

1) The \"épreuves d’artistes\" (\"artist\'s proofs\") of the original lithographs, numbered 1 to 98 and I to XXX

2) The \"tirage d’art\" (\"de Luxe Artist\'s Edition\") in which the original lithographs have been \"enhanced\" (\"retouchées\") by the artist himself with additions in watercolor and acrylics, numbered 1 to 8, and are available by Special Order.

If you have the stomach for it, here\'s an American \"Christian expressionist\" painter who\'s making a fortune selling both his cheap prints and his \"enhanced\" \"paintings\", which are actually just prints which he has \"touched up\" with some \"hand-done\" highlights :

http://www.thomaskinkade.com/magi/servlet/com.asucon.ebiz.ho...

http://www.thomaskinkade.com/magi/servlet/com.asucon.ebiz.ca...

Argggg....



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 8 mins (2005-04-08 18:59:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The larger edition, \"Numérotées de 1 à 98 et de I à XXX pour les épreuves d’artistes\", will be, I believe, \"proofs\" or \"exemplars\" pulled from the stone under the direction of the artist --not \"approved by the artist\" as Jane seems to be suggesting (perhaps I\'m reading her wrong, however).

In any event, it is definitely a high-quality edition, and calling it one made up of \"artist\'s proofs\" may be a bit too negative in English, since \"proof\" generally, has the sense of a \"pull\" which is a transitory \"state\" of the print.

Typically, the artist would work on his plate (or stone), pull a proof, then work on the plate again, pull another proof, etc., the sucessive pulls giving him a chance to see what the end product will look like as it nears \"completion\".

Each of these \"proofs\" would correspond to what the art hysterians call a \"state\" of the print. The various \"states\" themselves are highly prized and collectable, since they give us a detailed isight into the working processes of the artist.

At some point the artist gets his work down to a place that he\'s happy with and stops working on the plate. (And knowing when to stop mucking about with the plate is definitely an importat part of being a good printmaker.)

But it seems clear to me that all 128 copies of this \"artist\'s proof\" edition will be, virtually, the same, pulled from the same, completed and unaltered plate from the beginning of the \"run\" to the end.

The final eight prints of the other edition will (probably) be pulled from that same plate (in the same state) and will be identical to the first edition before the watercolor/acrylic \"enhancements\" are applied by the artist\'s own precious hand.

As opposed to lithography, in the engraving technique --where the prints are pulled from a metal plate (usually copper)-- there is a slight, but noticable, deterioriation in the quality of each sucessive print that is pulled, since the ink roller and paper actually abraid the metal, ever so slightly.

True connoisseurs of engravings are *very* picky folks and they really *like* those early pulls, for such things as the little, slightly rough edges to the lines which are caused by the \"burr\" which the burin has made when the lines are scratched in the plate.

(Print connoisseurs are very \"sensuous\" folk.)

In a lithograph, however, there wouldn\'t be any deterioration of the print quality from one pull to the next at all, I believe --and the first of a series would be identical in quality and appearance to the 100th (except, perhaps, for variations in the ink colors).

Christopher Crockett
Local time: 03:11
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 46
Grading comment
special artist's edition upon request, entirely enhanced by... No need to add "unlimited" since it's explicit that they're numbered from 1 to 8. Thanks a lot to all! Très bonnes explications.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  suezen: I agree with your reasoning
20 mins
  -> Proving, once again, that Great minds Run in the Same Ruts. Thanks, suezen.

agree  Dylan Edwards: You've thought this out properly!
51 mins
  -> Sometimes, no matter what I do, I find something that looks like it could be a right answer. Thanks, Dylan.

agree  David Vaughn: I prefer your 1st suggestion, which remains rather descriptive, with the specifics following in the text. "De Luxe is crass and commercial sounding, not at all the proper tone here.
1 hr
  -> I think I'd want something of the "artiste" in the term for the hi-toned edition. You're right about the connotations of "de Luxe", but I couldn't come up with anything better. Thanks, Vaughn.

neutral  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: I agree with fine art print..but it does not actually say anything about limited editions....it is a fine art print numbered x to y...
1 hr
  -> ?

agree  xxxdf49f
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, df.
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