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prise dans le plastique; all over genre; rempli

English translation: imbedded in the plastic; the "all over" genre

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:prise dans le plastique; all over genre
English translation:imbedded in the plastic; the "all over" genre
Entered by: Parrot
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12:50 Nov 27, 2000
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
French term or phrase: prise dans le plastique; all over genre; rempli
"Il y a 12 ans, j'ai fait une exposition entiere de porcelaine cassee prise dans le plastique cette fois-ci, ca s'appelait "Fragments de Chine," c'etait de la porcelaine chinoise, et c'etait tres unitaire, all over genre Pollock, c'etait rempli, rempli." I'm not sure what he means by "prise dans le plastique." Is "all over genre" also used in English? And what do you think "rempli" refers to here? Thank you, Karen
Karen Tucker
United States
Local time: 20:44
broken porcelain imbedded in the plastic... the "all-over"
Explanation:
was really not a genre in Pollock's time, but his works were called "all-over painting" by the Clement Greenberg generation of art commentators. The phrase by itself is thus important. This meant that no spaces were left blank (rempli); he often took pains to cover even the edges. So you might say "all over" genre, between quotation marks. The continuity of the brushwork (throwing work, in Pollock's case) was established precisely by this unbroken "mannerism." Later expressionists were to develop this technique further by building up layers of paint on canvas so thick they could be measured in inches (Schnabel, for one, or Rauschenberg). The paint was physically constructed as a reality by itself, as against being a pictorial realism.
Selected response from:

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 02:44
Grading comment
Thanks very much for the explanation. Your answer fits this context perfectly (as it turns out, Schnabel also comes up in this interview). Sounds like you're knowledgeable about art! Thanks also to the two others who helped out.
Karen
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
nabroken porcelain imbedded in the plastic... the "all-over"
Parrot
naoverall like PollockCamilo Prates
naset/embedded in plastic; an overall genre à la Pollock; chockful
Yolanda Broad


  

Answers


31 mins
set/embedded in plastic; an overall genre à la Pollock; chockful


Explanation:
(1) Found the following, for a translation of "prise," when scanning entries in Termium for "prise":

English:Glues and Adhesives (Chemistry)
setting s
OBS - set: To convert an adhesive into a fixed or hardened state by chemical or physical action, such as condensation, polymerization, oxidation, vulcanization, gelation, hydration, or evaporation of volatile constituents. s

Looks like it works, doesn't it? Although you might also try "embedded"–this is a term frequently used for art material set in grouting, cement, etc., so why not plastic?

(2) "all over genre" looks to me like a Frenchism for "overall genre"–I get 134 hits, mostly for artsy-fartsy stuff, with this expression: an overall genre à la Pollock

See: http://www.google.com/search?q="overall genre"&hl=en&lr=&saf...

But it just might be this, too (from Termium):

English:Textiles: Preparation and Processing
Textile Weaving
allover pattern s CORRECT
all-over pattern s CORRECT
1994-10-13

(3) "rempli" I read the context for this as self-congratulation: look how well I managed to meet my own criteria of artistic performance. In this context, "rempli" is +/- the equivalent of "brimful," full to overflowing, etc. Since it's not "really" liquid (although, of course, the technical meaning of plastic is "material that flows"), how about "chockful"?


    Reference: http://www.termium.com
    Reference: http://www.google.com
Yolanda Broad
United States
Local time: 20:44
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1551

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
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58 mins
overall like Pollock


Explanation:
Hi,

Since the character of the text seems to be quite informal, it seems like the author could just be using "all over genre Pollock" to indicate some similarity with the painter's style.

For "prise dans le plastique" would, perhaps, "held in plastic" work? Maybe "enclosed" or "contained," instead of "held," might also be appropriate.

For "rempli, rempli" I would guess that the author is referring either to attendance at the exhibition or to the number of works. So, perhaps, since the repetition sounds weird in English, "it was really full" would work? If the context clarifies it better, would perhaps something more specific, like "it was really crowded" (if the author is indeed referring to to the attendance), work better?

Hope these suggestions are of any help!

Camilo Prates
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1 hr
broken porcelain imbedded in the plastic... the "all-over"


Explanation:
was really not a genre in Pollock's time, but his works were called "all-over painting" by the Clement Greenberg generation of art commentators. The phrase by itself is thus important. This meant that no spaces were left blank (rempli); he often took pains to cover even the edges. So you might say "all over" genre, between quotation marks. The continuity of the brushwork (throwing work, in Pollock's case) was established precisely by this unbroken "mannerism." Later expressionists were to develop this technique further by building up layers of paint on canvas so thick they could be measured in inches (Schnabel, for one, or Rauschenberg). The paint was physically constructed as a reality by itself, as against being a pictorial realism.


    See American Expressionism 1950s-60s
Parrot
Spain
Local time: 02:44
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1861
Grading comment
Thanks very much for the explanation. Your answer fits this context perfectly (as it turns out, Schnabel also comes up in this interview). Sounds like you're knowledgeable about art! Thanks also to the two others who helped out.
Karen
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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