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Endurance déboîtage

English translation: Dislocation durability

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Endurance déboîtage
English translation:Dislocation durability
Entered by: Adsion
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22:17 Jul 2, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Automotive / Cars & Trucks / Auto parts technical specifications
French term or phrase: Endurance déboîtage
It's one title of a list of test procedure specifications:

**Endurance déboîtage** de dossier (couple de 45 daN.m)
Effort de manœuvre des dossiers à commande manuelle
Endurance du système vibrant de suivi de trajectoire latérale sur siège individuel complet
Endurance des appuis-tête réglables manuellement
...

TiA!
Adsion
Canada
Local time: 22:25
Dislocation durability
Explanation:
Impossible to know if this refers to the resistance of the seatback to dislocating forces (dislocation is undesirable) or to the durability of a dislocation operation (as in the case of seat backs that tip forward for access to the back seats in cars without rear doors.

As the words stand it appears to refer to a "desired" operation of dislocation of the seatback relative to the squab (cushion), involving testing to determine how many times it can be done before failure.

Dislocation as in shoulders, hips, etc. (remember Mel Gibson as the tough cop, Martin Riggs, whose shoulder "se déboîte" from time to time, and who has to throw himself against walls to get it back into its socket).

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Note added at 11 hrs (2008-07-03 09:25:37 GMT)
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Hard to say, without more context, which I suspect you do not have in any case. If you do a lot of this stuff - and you do appear to - I would suggest you ask them to relocate YOU to the Peugeot/Renault/Citroen factory so you can see for yourself what is going on. A desk and a laptop somewhere on the shopfloor, you'd be a bother to no one ...

"DISlocation" indicates a very specific context. "Location" is much broader (situation, place), so I'd avoid using it. I agree they are opposite sides of the same coin, it's just that "location" is a side on many coins that "dislocation" doesn't come near.

Of course if you want to use the reciprocal of "déboîtement" you could say something like "engagement durability".

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Note added at 11 hrs (2008-07-03 09:26:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Though "engagement durability" possibly has more to do with back seats than reclining front ones ;-)
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 04:25
Grading comment
Thanks for your answer and explanation, Bourth!
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
2 +1Dislocation durabilityxxxBourth


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Dislocation durability


Explanation:
Impossible to know if this refers to the resistance of the seatback to dislocating forces (dislocation is undesirable) or to the durability of a dislocation operation (as in the case of seat backs that tip forward for access to the back seats in cars without rear doors.

As the words stand it appears to refer to a "desired" operation of dislocation of the seatback relative to the squab (cushion), involving testing to determine how many times it can be done before failure.

Dislocation as in shoulders, hips, etc. (remember Mel Gibson as the tough cop, Martin Riggs, whose shoulder "se déboîte" from time to time, and who has to throw himself against walls to get it back into its socket).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs (2008-07-03 09:25:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Hard to say, without more context, which I suspect you do not have in any case. If you do a lot of this stuff - and you do appear to - I would suggest you ask them to relocate YOU to the Peugeot/Renault/Citroen factory so you can see for yourself what is going on. A desk and a laptop somewhere on the shopfloor, you'd be a bother to no one ...

"DISlocation" indicates a very specific context. "Location" is much broader (situation, place), so I'd avoid using it. I agree they are opposite sides of the same coin, it's just that "location" is a side on many coins that "dislocation" doesn't come near.

Of course if you want to use the reciprocal of "déboîtement" you could say something like "engagement durability".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs (2008-07-03 09:26:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Though "engagement durability" possibly has more to do with back seats than reclining front ones ;-)

xxxBourth
Local time: 04:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 673
Grading comment
Thanks for your answer and explanation, Bourth!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks for your quick reply Bourth, but should I also understand location durability?

Asker: Thank you for your explanation, I just wanna confirm my understanding in this case, not prefer to employ the reciprocal.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  chris collister: I wonder if just "articulation" would cover it? As for daNm, the author should hide his head in shame. There's nothing wrong with SI, so use it, I say!
9 hrs
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