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KudoZ home » French to English » Automotive / Cars & Trucks

passer le permis

English translation: to learn to drive (fudging the issue) NFG

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22:53 Jul 3, 2008
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Automotive / Cars & Trucks
French term or phrase: passer le permis
Combien vous a coûté, approximativement, le passage de votre permis (cours de conduite, inscription à l’examen théorique et à l’examen pratique)
caro44
Local time: 19:28
English translation:to learn to drive (fudging the issue) NFG
Explanation:
although it is true that the context implies that you GET your licence in the end, I would simply like to call the attention of people who see these exchanges in years to come to the fact that the expression "passer un test/examen" means to SIT it, NOT to pass it
Selected response from:

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 19:28
Grading comment
Thanks CMJ_Trans! Thanks to all for your help and your very interesting contributions
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5get/obtain your driving licence
David Hollywood
3 +5to learn to drive (fudging the issue) NFGxxxCMJ_Trans
5How much did your driving training cost?saraja
3to take / sit / go for BUT... [NFG]
Tony M
3to pass your driving testDave 72
3take driver's testMatthewLaSon
3to get your driver's licence (GB)
Catherine CHAUVIN


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
to get your driver's licence (GB)


Explanation:
ou drivers' license (US)

Driving licence en GB et plus familier, à mon avis.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 minutes (2008-07-03 23:07:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Pas "et" mais "est".

Catherine CHAUVIN
France
Local time: 19:28
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: I think driver's license is more US, and driving licence more GB
1 hr
  -> Tu as raison pour l'américain license. Peut-être que je confonds avec le canadien. J'ai pourtant eu ma première leçon de conduite dans le Northumberland. :-)) Ils disaient effectivement driving licence. Merci pour la remarque.
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
take driver's test


Explanation:
Hello,

I always thought that "passer le permis" just meant "to take driver's test." I never knew that it implied that you passed it.

get driver's license = réussir son permis

MatthewLaSon
Local time: 13:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 29

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Yes, Matt, but as this is all in the past tense, we are perhaps justified in assuming that the person did actually get it as well. / You may well be right, but I just feel that one can afford to get away from the FR and say what sounds natural in EN...
1 hr
  -> J'ai passé le permis sans le réussir. I don't agree with you. It's better to just say what the French is literally saying here, even if it is implied that the person ended up passing the driver's exam. Also, "taking driver's exam" implies "lessons"
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
to learn to drive (fudging the issue) NFG


Explanation:
although it is true that the context implies that you GET your licence in the end, I would simply like to call the attention of people who see these exchanges in years to come to the fact that the expression "passer un test/examen" means to SIT it, NOT to pass it

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 19:28
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 90
Grading comment
Thanks CMJ_Trans! Thanks to all for your help and your very interesting contributions

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Clair@Lexeme: probably a very good way of getting round the problem!!!
57 mins

agree  Dave 72: Hi CMJ- think this would work (much better than my suggestion!) I agree that we don't want to see "passer" ever appearing in a glossary as "to pass a test"!
1 hr
  -> exactly - that's what I feared

agree  xxxBourth: Good fudge.
2 hrs

agree  Juliette Scott: Excellent fudge. What does NFG mean?
2 hrs
  -> not for grading

agree  Tony M: Very good points! Tho' I rather fear that this *could* imply 'learnt to drive... but never actually took the test'
1 day1 hr
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
to pass your driving test


Explanation:
This is what I would say, since in the UK, people do get a licence (a provisional one) before passing the test, and then receive a full licence afterwards- if I can remember that far back! So getting a licence does not always refer to passing the test. This might be splitting hairs though, and I think the other options are fine!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs (2008-07-04 09:15:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I'm not suggesting that "passer" can ever by itself mean "pass" (a test)

Dave 72
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: 'passer' is a faux ami here, since it would mean 'take your driving test' — but the implication is clearly 'take it (and pass it)', hence: 'get your license'
33 mins
  -> Hi Tony- I was reading "passage" as meaning the taking of the test, but as success (as you rightly point out) is implied, then I would still personally call the whole process "passing your driving test".

neutral  Robin Levey: The problem is that the cost 'to *fail* your driving test' is exactly the same as that to 'pass' it. As Tony says, 'passer' means 'take the test' without inferring any degree of success.
2 hrs
  -> Hi mediamatrix- I agree, although along with Tony, I still think there is success (and hence, I would say, a pass) implied in this particular question. I'm certainly not suggesting that "passer" can ever by itself mean "to pass" a test
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
get/obtain your driving licence


Explanation:
:)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 mins (2008-07-03 23:01:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"license" in the US

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 hrs (2008-07-04 11:09:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Given the context I think it most probably means doing everyyhing necessary to get the licence ... would be logical ...

David Hollywood
Local time: 14:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
1 hr
  -> thanks Tony :)

agree  Robin Levey: That's most likely what the source text is really asking about - lessons, exams (passed or failed) - everything up to becoming streetworthy and legit.
3 hrs
  -> I think it's what it means given the context ... thanks mediamatrix :)

agree  Patrice
4 hrs
  -> thanks Patrice :)

agree  1045
5 hrs
  -> thanks 1045 :)

agree  Radu DANAILA
7 hrs
  -> thanks Radud :)

neutral  xxxCMJ_Trans: this answer would need more explanations - passer un test/examen = to sit that test or exam NOT necessarily pass (you may also fail), a FAUX AMI
8 hrs
  -> I agree and "passer" is not "pass" for sure ... thanks CMJ :)

neutral  swanda: agree with CMJ_Trans
8 hrs
  -> me too :) thanks swanda :)
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1 day10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
passer
to take / sit / go for BUT... [NFG]


Explanation:
I really quite agree with all the opinions expressed here, and just wanted to pull together some of the points (as CMJ has already done) about this verb 'passer'

Yes, it is perfectly true that in normal terms, 'passer' only means to sit (an examen) / take (a test) / go for (an MOT), and does NOT automatically imply "to PASS it".

However, I do note that in everyday speech, perhaps very lazily, or maybe just a regional thing down here in the sticks, people DO sometimes use it with soemthing of the sense of the EN 'to pass' — in the sense of 'going through a test (etc.) AND being successful'

I often here people say things like "ma bagnole passe au contrôle demain matin" — there, in the future tense, it is quite clearly only being used to mean 'to take / go for'

But afterwards, they also quite often say "ma bagnole est passée au contrôle hier" — used in the past like this, and without further qualification, I have only ever heard it to mean '...and got through it OK'

So I think, at least in everyday speech, this is probably one of those questions of a subtle difference of perspective.

Tony M
France
Local time: 19:28
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 452
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1 day17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
How much did your driving training cost?


Explanation:
Training means the process of learning a skill and it includes driving lessons and driving test.

saraja
Mauritius
Local time: 21:28
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
Non-PRO (1): Emma Paulay


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Changes made by editors
Jul 5, 2008 - Changes made by Tony M:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO


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