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Monsieur le Ministre

English translation: Minister

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05:38 Nov 9, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
French term or phrase: Monsieur le Ministre
What is the correct form of address in a speech?
Amanda Grey
France
Local time: 03:57
English translation:Minister
Explanation:
Is what you would hear in a BBC interview. Where the French say "Monsieur le Premier Ministre", to give a slightly different example, they would say " Prime Minister, you said in your speech...".

Also, think of the famous TV programme "Yes Minister", in which a minister is being addressed by his chief civil servant.
Selected response from:

mckinnc
Local time: 03:57
Grading comment
many thanks to all
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2Ministermckinnc
4Comment - Mister Minister
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
4Secretary of State (UK), Mr (or Madam) Secretary (US)
VBaby
4It all depends 2
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
4Minister
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
4Mister Minister
Victoria Barkoff
4 -1Your Excellency, Minister...
Maya Jurt


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Your Excellency, Minister...


Explanation:
Hosted by the Minister of Health and Welfare. Your Excellency Minister of Health
Dr Suyudi, Your Excellencies Ministers, Ambassador ...



    Reference: http://www.who.int/director-general/speeches/2000/20001012_j...
Maya Jurt
Switzerland
Local time: 03:57
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 412

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  mckinnc: isn't that someone referring first to an ambassador and then to a minister?
0 min
  -> No, it's what I heard listing to the UN-crowd for years. The example is a Brundtland (WHO) speech
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Minister


Explanation:
Is what you would hear in a BBC interview. Where the French say "Monsieur le Premier Ministre", to give a slightly different example, they would say " Prime Minister, you said in your speech...".

Also, think of the famous TV programme "Yes Minister", in which a minister is being addressed by his chief civil servant.


    experience
mckinnc
Local time: 03:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 922
Grading comment
many thanks to all

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maya Jurt: Yes, but not in a speech.
0 min
  -> I don't agree

agree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne
27 mins
  -> thanks nikki!
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Mister Minister


Explanation:
"SECRETARY POWELL: Thank you Mister Minister..."

http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/2001/index.cfm?docid=3801


    Reference: http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/2001/index.cfm?docid=3801
Victoria Barkoff
Local time: 21:57
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 119

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  mckinnc: sounds weird to my (British) ears
3 mins
  -> I am quoting form a speech by US Secretary of State, Colin Powell,

neutral  Maya Jurt: Very weird!
4 mins
  -> Google has 112 hits for this term.

disagree  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Mister Minister is incorrect in the UK anyway. Google hits for this one are "translated" sites, essentially.
38 mins
  -> but correct in North America, as a number of untranslated hits indicate...
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35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Minister


Explanation:
Depends...

If you are addressing the minister himself/herself, then “Minister” will do the trick. Ditto if he/she is part of a list of people present, all of whom are being addressed – be careful to get them in the right order of importance.

It might also depend on other positions held by the minister, a peerage for example. Check out the person concerned on : http://www.parliament.the-stationery-office.co.uk/pa/cm20010...

After the name, you will see whether the person is a Rt Honourable X or whatever.

You cannot go wrong with the Beeb, aka the BBC – or at least I thought it was safe until I spotted this split infinitive : http://savebbc.org/contacts.html : “Debrett's has information on how to properly address UK ambassadors and high commissioners in person and by letter on their Correct Forms of Address page.”

http://news6.thdo.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/uk_politics/a-z_of_pa...

Thursday, 17 August, 2000, 10:01 GMT 11:01 UK
Forms of address
During debates in the House, MPs do not refer to each other by name but by a number of formal titles according to their status.
This polite tone is adopted in an attempt to maintain order and good humour during debates.
Most MPs are referred to as `the Honourable Member for...' followed by the name of their constituency.
If the person being addressed is a member of the same party he or she is referred to as `my Honourable Friend'.
If the MP is a practising lawyer he or she is referred to as `Honourable and Learned'.
If a member is a past or present member of the armed forces they may be addressed as `Honourable and Gallant', although this is very rarely used nowadays.
`Right Honourable' indicates a member of the Privy Council - normally a past or present minister.
Wednesday, 8 March, 2000, 12:26 GMT
Ministers
The Prime Minister selects a large team of ministers to run each of the government departments, such as the Department for Education or the Home Office.
The head of each department is usually a secretary of state and sits in the cabinet. Each secretary of state has a team of junior ministers, known as ministers of state, parliamentary under secretaries of state and parliamentary secretaries.
Each member of the ministerial team is given responsibility for making decisions on a particular area of policy. Ministers take decisions after receiving advice from their civil servants.
Ministers must also keep Parliament informed about the work of their department, appearing regularly in the House to answer oral questions, as well as replying to the many hundreds of written questions that they are asked by MPs.
Ministers are normally Members of Parliament although most come from the House of Commons rather than the House of Lords.
Strictly the first ministers to be officially termed as such were David Lloyd George who became Minister of Munitions and Lord Lansdowne (Minister without Portfolio) in 1915.

http://www.debretts.co.uk/people/address.asp

This might be of use if the person happens to be a peer.

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/euoffice/flanfestjm.asp

Other useful sources :

http://www.parliament.the-stationery-office.co.uk/pa/cm20010...

List of Members of the Cabinet, Depts of State and Ministers, etc. Lots of Rt Honorables, Esq and Lords…




Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 03:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431
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42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
It all depends 2


Explanation:
It depends of whether the Minster is a Minster in the House of Commons or
Lords

House of Commons
According to Dodd's Parliamentary Companion, a Minister is an MP first and
Minister second and so in direct speech he should be addressed as follows
"Could I ask the Honourable Member for Grimsby....", or, if he is a Privy
Councillor (as most minsters of State are) - "Could I ask the Right
Honourable Member for Grimsby.....".

House of Lords

" If the Noble Lord could please answer the question"

acceptable Lords and Commons alternative

However it would also be acceptable to say
"could the Minster please tell the House when his Report will be available
......."

If he was being referred to it would be acceptable to say "I feel that the
Minister seriously misled the House yesterday and I therefore call for his
resignation ....."

The salutation would be "Dear Minster"

The Prime Minster however is always referred to as "Prime Minister", or "The
Prime Minster" in the same way as the "Lord Chancellor", "Mr/Madam Speaker"
and "Black Rod"

I hope this helps




    Direct from a friend who's been working in the HoL for nearly 20 years.
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 03:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Comment - Mister Minister


Explanation:
Yes, did a bit of rooting about. Victoria was right about there being authoritative original language US sources for Mister Minister when addressing cabinet members of foreign governments. In the UK, it would be Minister alone.

Apologies for reams of inappropriate refs and info - oops!

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 03:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Secretary of State (UK), Mr (or Madam) Secretary (US)


Explanation:
Just a footnote to the interesting answers above: ministre and minister are of course two notorious faux amis.

A ministre in French is the head of a ministerial department, generally presiding over several secrétaires d'Etat. In the UK, the head of the ministerial department is a Secretary of State and the lower rank are called Ministers of State, or Ministers for short. In the US, the head of the ministerial department is called a Secretary.

Therefore, the correct formal form of address (in conversation or non-parliamentary speeches) is either "Secretary of State" (UK) or "Mr (or Madam) Secretary" (US).

In the MoD press briefing referenced below, the military spokesman opens his statement with "Secretary of State, Ladies and Gentlemen, good morning!", referring to his boss (then) UK Defence Secretary George Robertson. He doesn't use Minister.

http://www.kosovo.mod.uk/brief140699.htm

Of course, Nikki is entirely right to note that forms of address depend on the setting and that the British Parliament in particular has its own peculiar rules.


    Experience as a foreign correspondent in the UK and US, personal interest in UK and US politics
    Reference: http://www.pch.gc.ca/ceremonial-symb/english/prt_address_2.h...
VBaby
Local time: 02:57
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 401

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Victoria Barkoff: But in Quebec, a 'ministre" is a minister.
15 hrs
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