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Moroccan usage - dahir / dinanderie

English translation: dinmanderie: brassware/brass articles

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07:37 Sep 10, 2000
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
French term or phrase: Moroccan usage - dahir / dinanderie
Context for 'dahir': a sentence with a list of different kinds of laws (I have already checked on the internet without much success; I suspect it may be a kind of law)

Context for 'dinaderie': it's a kind of business that may or may not be typical of the Fez region (does it come from 'dinde'?)
amjm
English translation:dinmanderie: brassware/brass articles
Explanation:
dinanderie comes from the city of Dinant (Belgium) famous for brass and copper ware.

dahir is a royal decree in Morocco..
Selected response from:

xxxrnoel
Grading comment
As the first and spot-on answer. Thanks to laura too for all the interesting info.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
nasee below
Laura Gentili
nasee below
Laura Gentili
nasee below
Laura Gentili
nadinmanderie: brassware/brass articlesxxxrnoel


  

Answers


4 mins
dinmanderie: brassware/brass articles


Explanation:
dinanderie comes from the city of Dinant (Belgium) famous for brass and copper ware.

dahir is a royal decree in Morocco..


    PLI.
xxxrnoel
PRO pts in pair: 31
Grading comment
As the first and spot-on answer. Thanks to laura too for all the interesting info.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Yolanda Broad

Karen Tucker

Heathcliff
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

43 mins
see below


Explanation:
This is what the Encyclopedia Britannica says (see also the reference to Islam):

dinanderie
type of late medieval brass ware made in and around Dinant, Belg.

Brass does not appear to have been used extensively in Europe until the 11th or 12th century, when a considerable industry was established in the Low Countries in the district near the Meuse (Maas) River. By the 15th century its centre, Dinant, had become a prosperous town the name of which was synonymous with excellent brass ware. Included in the production were such domestic articles as ewers, fire irons, candlesticks, dishes, and basins and such ecclesiastical objects as censers, aquamaniles, fonts, and lecterns.

When the town was sacked in 1466 by Charles the Bold, son of Philippe III le Bon, duke of Burgundy, the craftsmen dispersed, and the industry spread to other towns along the Meuse and to Brussels, Bruges, and Tournai, eventually establishing a new production centre in Aachen. Some of the fleeing "brass-beaters" may have gone as far as Nürnberg, which was already becoming famous for its metalworking and was soon to achieve the prominence of the old centres. In the late 15th and 16th centuries the "basin-beaters" of Nürnberg produced numerous embossed dishes and basins of a characteristic type, which were exported to most parts of Europe. These objects have also come to be known as dinanderie.

The earliest type of dinanderie, Gothic in feeling and outline, is generally small and deep and made of a golden-coloured brass. Pieces from the 16th century and later are flatter, larger, and of a darker colour. The embossed decoration, executed with large stamps, falls into two major categories: religious and allegorical subjects and stylized decorative patterns. Additional ornament was provided by punched bands of simple motifs repeated around the rim and encircling the main subject in the centre of the bowl. Many have a raised central boss in the form of an open rose with radiating petals, and some bear inscriptions in Gothic lettering or pseudo-Gothic-Islamic script. They are quite often found in churches, where they have been used as alms dishes.


Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 09:23
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 49

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Yolanda Broad

Karen Tucker

Heathcliff
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49 mins
see below


Explanation:
As for dahir, in a English text of the United Nations /CERD the term is left in the original language.
In another text, it is quoted as: dahir ("Royal Decree")

Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 09:23
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 49

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Yolanda Broad

Karen Tucker

Heathcliff
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

53 mins
see below


Explanation:
More on Fez and "dinanderie":

Copper and brass
Moroccan metalwork includes iron, bronze and especially copper and brass. Marrakech and Fez are the two main centres where it is made and sold. A wide range of decorative and functional objects, such as copper trays and ewers inlaid with silver, teapots, cooking pots, pots and pans, vases and caskets, are displayed for sale in Souks.



Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 09:23
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 49

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Yolanda Broad

Heathcliff
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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