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apport-fusion

English translation: merger

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01:42 Oct 4, 2000
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
French term or phrase: apport-fusion
Does anyone know if there is a specific English term for this? It describes a merger whereby the company being taken over contributes its shares, in exchange for consideration in shares and cash.
Maxine Smith
English translation:merger
Explanation:
I remember looking for this a couple of years ago when the term appeared in a translation I was doing on the merger of two big insurance companies.

If I remember correctly, the English term "merger" covers the first part of the French term "apport-fusion". Here is a definition, albeit from a Candian source but one which is sufficiently detailed and close to rthe English meaning - and accessible on the web - that you may well decide that "merger" alone is appropriate for your context.

THE DEFINITION OF "MERGER"
16. Section 91 of the Act defines a merger as any transaction in which control over, or a significant interest in, the whole or a part of a business of another person is acquired or established. With respect to corporations, "control" is explicitly defined in section 2(4) of the Act to mean de jure control, i.e., a direct or indirect holding of more than 50 percent of the votes that may be cast to elect directors of the corporation, and which are sufficient to elect a majority of such directors. Although significant interest is not defined in the Act, the Bureau's position is that a "significant interest" in the whole or a part of a business is held when one or more persons have the ability to materially influence the economic behaviour (e.g., decisions relating to pricing, purchasing, distribution, marketing or investment) of that business or of a part of that business. Given the range of management and ownership structures which exist, a determination of whether a significant interest is likely to be acquired or established must be made on a case by case basis.

Nikki

I forgot to look on the site of the London Stock Exchange. I think they probably have a glossary which may assist.
Selected response from:

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 03:57
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
namerger
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
naThere's such a thing as stock-for-stock merger,
Parrot
namerger in kind
Mats Wiman


  

Answers


33 mins
merger in kind


Explanation:
the only expression I could thinkof, bur I'm far from sure.

in kind=in exchange for food, horses pearls,shares, options as opposed to cash


    MMI
Mats Wiman
Sweden
Local time: 03:57
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish
PRO pts in pair: 133
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1 hr
There's such a thing as stock-for-stock merger,


Explanation:
such as the one recently carried out by Intel..

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 03:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1861
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1 hr
merger


Explanation:
I remember looking for this a couple of years ago when the term appeared in a translation I was doing on the merger of two big insurance companies.

If I remember correctly, the English term "merger" covers the first part of the French term "apport-fusion". Here is a definition, albeit from a Candian source but one which is sufficiently detailed and close to rthe English meaning - and accessible on the web - that you may well decide that "merger" alone is appropriate for your context.

THE DEFINITION OF "MERGER"
16. Section 91 of the Act defines a merger as any transaction in which control over, or a significant interest in, the whole or a part of a business of another person is acquired or established. With respect to corporations, "control" is explicitly defined in section 2(4) of the Act to mean de jure control, i.e., a direct or indirect holding of more than 50 percent of the votes that may be cast to elect directors of the corporation, and which are sufficient to elect a majority of such directors. Although significant interest is not defined in the Act, the Bureau's position is that a "significant interest" in the whole or a part of a business is held when one or more persons have the ability to materially influence the economic behaviour (e.g., decisions relating to pricing, purchasing, distribution, marketing or investment) of that business or of a part of that business. Given the range of management and ownership structures which exist, a determination of whether a significant interest is likely to be acquired or established must be made on a case by case basis.

Nikki

I forgot to look on the site of the London Stock Exchange. I think they probably have a glossary which may assist.


    Reference: http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/SSG/ct01288e.html
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 03:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4431
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