pic tarifaire

English translation: peak tariff

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:pic tarifaire
English translation:peak tariff
Entered by: Clair@Lexeme
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15:17 Jan 3, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial / international trade
French term or phrase: pic tarifaire
L'Union Européenne peut profiter des avantages de sa politique commerciale actuelle (degré moyen de protection faible, absence de pics tarifaires)...
Clair@Lexeme
France
Local time: 05:36
peak tariffs
Explanation:
Instruments compatible with the WTO

Français English EU DOCUMENT


(Solagral – April 1999)

A liberalisation process that isn’t
Despite the announcement of reductions in production and marketing support, the Agriculture Agreement in fact provides for only minimal and gradual liberalisation of trade in temperate agricultural products, while trade in tropical products has already been largely liberalised. In world markets, substantial volumes of temperate product exports will continue to be subsidised in 2000 (more than 36 million tonnes of wheat, i.e. more than a third of world exports). The tariff reduction commitments for developed countries are 37% as an average across all agricultural products (26% for grain products) and 43% on tropical products (35% for coffee, cocoa and tea; 40% for oilseeds, fats and oils). But, while customs duties on manufactured goods are now extremely low (falling from 6.3% to 3.8% on average), they are still around 40% on agricultural products, and exceptionally high (with peak tariff levels of up to 300%) on some temperate-zone products.

The most radical change brought by the Agriculture Agreement is the decoupling of agricultural support. Price and production support is being replaced (gradually) by direct income support, known as "decoupled" support. This system suits rich countries, which can afford to support farmers’ incomes directly. Domestic prices are thus being brought gradually into line with world market prices, but support goes directly to farmers. In Europe, this type of support accounts for more than half the income of some farmers. With decoupling, export subsidies are no longer needed for domestic producers to be competitive in the world market.





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Note added at 2003-01-03 15:22:27 (GMT)
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FINAL: no peak tariffs

absence= NO
Selected response from:

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Grading comment
Many thanks for your help
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +1peak tariffs
Jane Lamb-Ruiz
4 +1absence of peaks in tariffs
swisstell


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
absence of peaks in tariffs


Explanation:
absence of abrupt tariff movements

swisstell
Italy
Local time: 05:36
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in pair: 921

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Peter Coles
2 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
peak tariffs


Explanation:
Instruments compatible with the WTO

Français English EU DOCUMENT


(Solagral – April 1999)

A liberalisation process that isn’t
Despite the announcement of reductions in production and marketing support, the Agriculture Agreement in fact provides for only minimal and gradual liberalisation of trade in temperate agricultural products, while trade in tropical products has already been largely liberalised. In world markets, substantial volumes of temperate product exports will continue to be subsidised in 2000 (more than 36 million tonnes of wheat, i.e. more than a third of world exports). The tariff reduction commitments for developed countries are 37% as an average across all agricultural products (26% for grain products) and 43% on tropical products (35% for coffee, cocoa and tea; 40% for oilseeds, fats and oils). But, while customs duties on manufactured goods are now extremely low (falling from 6.3% to 3.8% on average), they are still around 40% on agricultural products, and exceptionally high (with peak tariff levels of up to 300%) on some temperate-zone products.

The most radical change brought by the Agriculture Agreement is the decoupling of agricultural support. Price and production support is being replaced (gradually) by direct income support, known as "decoupled" support. This system suits rich countries, which can afford to support farmers’ incomes directly. Domestic prices are thus being brought gradually into line with world market prices, but support goes directly to farmers. In Europe, this type of support accounts for more than half the income of some farmers. With decoupling, export subsidies are no longer needed for domestic producers to be competitive in the world market.





--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-03 15:22:27 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

FINAL: no peak tariffs

absence= NO

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 8576
Grading comment
Many thanks for your help

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Aida Macedo
15 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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