KudoZ home » French to English » Bus/Financial

médecins libéraux

English translation: some information to help

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
21:55 Apr 29, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
French term or phrase: médecins libéraux
XXXXX couvre l’ensemble des métiers de l’hospitalisation et a su développer une offre globale de services pour soigner ses patients en partenariat étroit avec le corps médical libéral. Plus de 3.000 médecins, la quasi-totalité étant des libéraux, recouvrant les diverses spécialités de la médecine, pratiquent régulièrement leur activité au sein des établissements de XXXXX.
I thought this might mean physicians in private practice, but I am now wondering whether these are non-Social Security ("National Health") physicians.
Paul Sadur
Local time: 16:14
English translation:some information to help
Explanation:
"Médecins libéraux" means self-employed doctors with their own practice, ie not salaried employees of a hospital. Here in France, they're allowed in certain circumstances to treat patients on a "private" basis, even in "public" hospitals. For instance, an ear, nose and throat specialist sees patients in his own "cabinet" in town but operates on them in a local hospital.

However, using the terms "private" and "public" can cause confusion - it's nothing like the NHS / private health difference in the UK. The patient is reimbursed by the state on the same basis for both sectors, and if he has reasonable insurance to cover the costs not reimbursed by the social security system, it often makes no difference at all to him whether he is treated in the "public" or "private" sector.

Now I've said all this, I've had an idea : how about "independent external doctors"? Surely someone else can come up with something better.
Anyway, hope this is useful.
Selected response from:

Buzzy
Local time: 23:14
Grading comment
What you've said here goes along with the text. Later on, it made a distinction between physicians in private practice who used the private hospital facilities and others who were salaried and not called "libéraux".
"in private practice" is a common expression in English, at least in American English.
Thanks for the background information.

2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
naindependent medical practitioner
lefoque
naFree Medical Specialists/Practitioner
1964
nasome information to helpBuzzy


  

Answers


2 hrs
some information to help


Explanation:
"Médecins libéraux" means self-employed doctors with their own practice, ie not salaried employees of a hospital. Here in France, they're allowed in certain circumstances to treat patients on a "private" basis, even in "public" hospitals. For instance, an ear, nose and throat specialist sees patients in his own "cabinet" in town but operates on them in a local hospital.

However, using the terms "private" and "public" can cause confusion - it's nothing like the NHS / private health difference in the UK. The patient is reimbursed by the state on the same basis for both sectors, and if he has reasonable insurance to cover the costs not reimbursed by the social security system, it often makes no difference at all to him whether he is treated in the "public" or "private" sector.

Now I've said all this, I've had an idea : how about "independent external doctors"? Surely someone else can come up with something better.
Anyway, hope this is useful.


    Many years using the French social securiy system !
Buzzy
Local time: 23:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 377
Grading comment
What you've said here goes along with the text. Later on, it made a distinction between physicians in private practice who used the private hospital facilities and others who were salaried and not called "libéraux".
"in private practice" is a common expression in English, at least in American English.
Thanks for the background information.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Gillian Hargreaves
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs
Free Medical Specialists/Practitioner


Explanation:
Perhaps Free may be used. Ýf They are not working under any "ýnstitution" on regular or salary basis.But perpahs best is to leave it in french as médecins libéraux . and write any set of description with Free Practitioners or.... in brackets. That is because it seems a special and personal name of a social institution spesific to that society.

1964
Turkey
Local time: 01:14
Native speaker of: Native in TurkishTurkish
PRO pts in pair: 294
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 hrs
independent medical practitioner


Explanation:
it seems to me we're talking about practitioners who come in from outside of a facility or organization, their opinion is less suspect since they do not rely on the organization or facility as their sole means of income.


    Reference: http://www.domino.ama.com.au/Dir0103/Position.nsf
lefoque
United States
Local time: 17:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 209
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search