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Hors taxes (HT)

English translation: net of tax

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:hors taxes
English translation:net of tax
Entered by: jgal
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03:56 Jul 27, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
French term or phrase: Hors taxes (HT)
HT (hors taxes) would translate as 'before VAT' or '+VAT' in British English, but is this understandable to an American?

What would be a better term for use in a document aimed at an American audience?

I've heard 'duty-free', and this is the translation I've found in several dictionaries, but to me (as a Brit), this conjurs up images of cheap beer and cigarettes...

Any Americans out there who can clarify?

Many thanks
jgal
Local time: 08:16
Net of tax
Explanation:
If you're writing for a business/commercial audience, they'll understand this term and its implied reference to sales tax.

I agree with you on the connotations of duty-free!

Cheers,
HC
Selected response from:

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 23:16
Grading comment
Thanks, I think this will be the best fit. I couldn't really provide more context - it was just "la somme totale ne pourra excéder 10 000 000 F HT" !
I seemed to remember when I visited the US that sales tax had a different name in each state I visited, which was why I was wary of using VAT.

Thanks to all of you for your suggestions.

Julia
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +1before sales tax
VBaby
naNet of taxHeathcliff
natax exempt
CLS Lexi-tech
natax exempt
CLS Lexi-tech
napurchasing tax not included
Francesco D'Alessandro
naTax freeAna and Michel


  

Answers


17 mins
Tax free


Explanation:
Why not use "tax free" ? Very common and thus well understood...

Ana and Michel
Spain
Local time: 08:16
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in SpanishSpanish
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25 mins
purchasing tax not included


Explanation:
Americans can understand that (why, is there no VAT in America?)
I shouldn't say tax free, actually it's not tax-free, only the tax will be added later

Francesco D'Alessandro
Spain
Local time: 07:16
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 67
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29 mins
tax exempt


Explanation:
I am American in the sense that I live in Canada (Québec) and speak North American English; can confirm that "tax exempt" is widely used.
I don't know your context and cannot be more precise than this.

Bonne chance
paola l m


CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 02:16
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 162
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35 mins
tax exempt


Explanation:
I am American in the sense that I live in Canada (Québec) and speak North American English; can confirm that "tax exempt" is widely used.
I don't know your context and cannot be more precise than this.

Bonne chance
paola l m

p.s. In Canada we have VAT, it is called GST (Goods and Services Tax in English) and TPS in French. Only some items are GST-TPS exempt. Tax exempt is a generic, no fril translation. It might be useful to consult Canadian government sites considering that most official publications (paper and otherwise) in Canada are bilingual.

p.



CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 02:16
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 162
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45 mins peer agreement (net): +1
before sales tax


Explanation:
The US equivalent of VAT is sales tax, which is perceived by the states.
So hors taxes can be translated as before sales tax, or not including sales tax.
Tax free or tax exempt imply that the good is not taxed at all. If this is the case, tax exempt is effectively the correct American expression


    Reference: http://content.techweb.com/wire/finance/story/INV20010504S00...
    Reference: http://www.salestaxinstitute.com/
VBaby
Local time: 07:16
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 401

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alexandra Hague: I think this is it too!
2 hrs
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1 hr
Net of tax


Explanation:
If you're writing for a business/commercial audience, they'll understand this term and its implied reference to sales tax.

I agree with you on the connotations of duty-free!

Cheers,
HC

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 23:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 953
Grading comment
Thanks, I think this will be the best fit. I couldn't really provide more context - it was just "la somme totale ne pourra excéder 10 000 000 F HT" !
I seemed to remember when I visited the US that sales tax had a different name in each state I visited, which was why I was wary of using VAT.

Thanks to all of you for your suggestions.

Julia
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