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n° Siret

English translation: (just a comment)

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08:36 Dec 8, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Business/Commerce (general)
French term or phrase: n° Siret
does anyone know the British or American equivalent of the French Siret number?
zac
Local time: 15:43
English translation:(just a comment)
Explanation:
Broadly speaking, there are two levels of identification numbers for businesses in France.
The first level is the Siren number (9 characters), which is given to the 'business' as a whole (a 'business' can be anything from a self-employed person such as me, to a huge corporation).
The second level is the Siret number (14 characters), which is allocated to each business premises used. The first 9 characters of this number are the same as the Siren number for the business using the premises. Note that every business has at least one Siret number (mine, for my home address, is my Siren+00014).

In the UK, the equivalent national business numbering system, known as the CRO number, differs from the French system in that:
a) it does not go down to the level of business premises - a number is allocated only to the 'business' itself
b) it does not apply to all categories of business - for example, the self-employed in the UK do not have a CRO number (you just use your NI number).

Hence, in the UK at least, there really is no true (1-to-1) equivalent for a French Siret number. So how you deal with it will depend on your context. However, I would generally be inclined to follow the advice already given, and not translate it, but perhaps explain it in brackets afterwards (e.g. "French national registration number"). In this explanation, I would probably NOT mention the word "company" or "business" since, strictly speaking, it is the number for the premises, not the company.

I don't know how it works in the USA.
Selected response from:

Charlie Bavington
Local time: 15:43
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +2(just a comment)Charlie Bavington
5SIRET number
Emmanouil Tyrakis
4employer identification number (SIRET)
lenkl
3company registration number
Jonathan MacKerron


  

Answers


36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
n° Siret
company registration number


Explanation:
so says Harrap Shorter

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
n° Siret
employer identification number (SIRET)


Explanation:
This is how I would put it in a translation into US English.

Se the website below for an explanation of SIREN and SIRET


    Reference: http://www.motamot.com/zoompages/siret.html
lenkl
Local time: 16:43
Specializes in field
PRO pts in category: 40
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
n° Siret
SIRET number


Explanation:
do not translate

Emmanouil Tyrakis
Local time: 17:43
Native speaker of: Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 3
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
n° Siret
(just a comment)


Explanation:
Broadly speaking, there are two levels of identification numbers for businesses in France.
The first level is the Siren number (9 characters), which is given to the 'business' as a whole (a 'business' can be anything from a self-employed person such as me, to a huge corporation).
The second level is the Siret number (14 characters), which is allocated to each business premises used. The first 9 characters of this number are the same as the Siren number for the business using the premises. Note that every business has at least one Siret number (mine, for my home address, is my Siren+00014).

In the UK, the equivalent national business numbering system, known as the CRO number, differs from the French system in that:
a) it does not go down to the level of business premises - a number is allocated only to the 'business' itself
b) it does not apply to all categories of business - for example, the self-employed in the UK do not have a CRO number (you just use your NI number).

Hence, in the UK at least, there really is no true (1-to-1) equivalent for a French Siret number. So how you deal with it will depend on your context. However, I would generally be inclined to follow the advice already given, and not translate it, but perhaps explain it in brackets afterwards (e.g. "French national registration number"). In this explanation, I would probably NOT mention the word "company" or "business" since, strictly speaking, it is the number for the premises, not the company.

I don't know how it works in the USA.

Charlie Bavington
Local time: 15:43
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 227
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  lenkl: Very good explanation, although "premise" seems a bit too restrictive for "établissement", which generally corrersponds to a "facility" that can occupy various premises. "Employer ID" is pretty close to that in the US
1 day 6 hrs

agree  xxxsarahl
1 day 8 hrs
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