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mise a l'antenne

English translation: putting on air / broadcast (company)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:mise à l'antenne
English translation:putting on air / broadcast (company)
Entered by: Yolanda Broad
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23:30 Jul 6, 2003
French to English translations [PRO]
Cinema, Film, TV, Drama / television
French term or phrase: mise a l'antenne
Does anyone know the right term for this in Eng? It is something like setting up the antenna for operations by a TV company, but it would be really useful if someone could let me know the commonly used and accepted term. Thanks in advance.
Daniel Marcus
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:09
going on air
Explanation:
It depends a lot on the exact context, as this term is used in many different ways, each with their own specific translation.

As Parrot so rightly says, as far as a programme is concerned, it will mean 'broadcast'; and usually, this refers to the first time something is broadcast (at least from the consumer's viewpoint); from a broadcaster's perspective, it might mean 'transmission date'.

However, from the context of your other recent questions, I suspect here you may be talking about the commissioning of the actual broadcasting hardware system itself. In this case "going on air" would be the literally accurate way of rendering 'mise à l'antenne'; however, please note that (as is so often the case) using a noun expression like this doesn't really work in English, so you'd need to turn the sentence round to make it a verbal one:

"XXX will be ready to go on air on the 2nd June"

"The system must be complete and ready to go on air before the contract completion date."

"An on-air date of 4th August has just been announced by new broadcaster ZZZ"

"The 'On-air' [OR: 'Transmission' OR 'TX'] condition is indicated by a big red light marked 'ON AIR'."

etc. etc.

See what I mean?

Of course, there are still further possibilities, this is the sort of 'specialist jargon' word that needs exactly the right interpretation in each individual case.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-07-07 10:22:25 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Daniel —

Your addiitonal context now makes it much clearer!

I reckon that in the first sentence, we are indeed talking about \'going on air\'

In the second sentence, it sounds to me more as if we are talking about this company that looks after programme buying etc., but not the actual broadcasting process itself.

Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 12:09
Grading comment
Dusty, thanks so much for taking the time to explain. 'Mise...' can be a tricky thing to translate sometimes.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2Broadcasted
Ethele Salem Sperling
4 +1going on air
Tony M
4 +1initial broadcast
Parrot
4antenna/satelitte/cable installation or hookup
Carolingua
4antenna connection
Monica Alves


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Broadcasted


Explanation:
Syn. diffuse ou mis a l'antenne

Ethele Salem Sperling
United States
Local time: 03:09
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: broadcast does not vary NO ED
1 hr

agree  Jonathan MacKerron: or simply "broadcast", sounds like the asker is not sure of his context
7 hrs

agree  xxxBourth: My feeling too. Webster's gives both -cast and -casted (bleeding Yanks!). I didn't realize Jane was such a Brit!
9 hrs
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
antenna connection


Explanation:
Low Noise Antenna Connection
Low Noise Antenna Connection. From: jpd@space.mit.edu (John Doty) Newsgroups:
rec.radio.shortwave Subject: Low Noise Antenna Connection ...
www.anarc.org/naswa/badx/antennas/ low-noise_antenna.html - 12k - Cached - Similar pages

TWL: RE: Cell Data Connection plus External antenna- how
TWL: RE: Cell Data Connection plus External antenna- how. Jeffrey Siegel
jeffrey.siegel@activecenter.com Fri May 2 12:05:49 EDT 2003: ...
lists.samurai.com/pipermail/trawler-world-list/ 2003-May/059310.html - 4k - Cached - Similar pages

TWL: Cell Data Connection plus External antenna- how
TWL: Cell Data Connection plus External antenna- how. Frank Burrows
fburrows@mail.com Fri May 2 16:37:37 EDT 2003: Previous message ...
lists.samurai.com/pipermail/trawler-world-list/ 2003-May/059318.html - 4k - Cached - Similar pages
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Adding an antenna to the D-Link DWL-650
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[EFM] Increase your cell phone antenna connection by 300%. sfu h
[EFM] Increase your cell phone antenna connection by 300%. sfu h. ... Subject:
[EFM] Increase your cell phone antenna connection by 300%. ...
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Monica Alves
Local time: 07:09
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: not the usual meaning for this term
7 hrs
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42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
antenna/satelitte/cable installation or hookup


Explanation:
This is from a consumer perspective...I don't know what the TV broadcast stations call it...but when you get cable TV, they call this to get your cable installed/connected or "hooked up". Same thing applies for satellite. In the USA, pretty much everyone has to get cable or satellite in order to get decent reception...

Just in case this helps.

Carolingua
United States
Local time: 03:09
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
initial broadcast


Explanation:
is really the more common meaning (first time a TV or radio show is aired, or first time a film is broadcast). This is a reservation to your definition.

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 12:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 3

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Saleh Ayyub
10 days
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
going on air


Explanation:
It depends a lot on the exact context, as this term is used in many different ways, each with their own specific translation.

As Parrot so rightly says, as far as a programme is concerned, it will mean 'broadcast'; and usually, this refers to the first time something is broadcast (at least from the consumer's viewpoint); from a broadcaster's perspective, it might mean 'transmission date'.

However, from the context of your other recent questions, I suspect here you may be talking about the commissioning of the actual broadcasting hardware system itself. In this case "going on air" would be the literally accurate way of rendering 'mise à l'antenne'; however, please note that (as is so often the case) using a noun expression like this doesn't really work in English, so you'd need to turn the sentence round to make it a verbal one:

"XXX will be ready to go on air on the 2nd June"

"The system must be complete and ready to go on air before the contract completion date."

"An on-air date of 4th August has just been announced by new broadcaster ZZZ"

"The 'On-air' [OR: 'Transmission' OR 'TX'] condition is indicated by a big red light marked 'ON AIR'."

etc. etc.

See what I mean?

Of course, there are still further possibilities, this is the sort of 'specialist jargon' word that needs exactly the right interpretation in each individual case.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-07-07 10:22:25 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Daniel —

Your addiitonal context now makes it much clearer!

I reckon that in the first sentence, we are indeed talking about \'going on air\'

In the second sentence, it sounds to me more as if we are talking about this company that looks after programme buying etc., but not the actual broadcasting process itself.



Tony M
France
Local time: 12:09
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 386
Grading comment
Dusty, thanks so much for taking the time to explain. 'Mise...' can be a tricky thing to translate sometimes.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  mckinnc: going on air for the first time, judging by the asker's explanation
22 mins
  -> Thanks, Colin ! The added context certainly seems to suggest that...
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