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English translation: It's not Manx (TT), it's "buton"

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13:44 Jul 5, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Construction / Civil Engineering / Wall-mounting for electrical equipment
French term or phrase: button
Another item for wall-fixing of heavy equipment. This time, it is a sort of 'spacer' apparently inserted between the wall and a heavy-duty angle bracket. I wondered about 'stand-off', but then also the term 'button' seems so much like franglais, I wondered if in fact this is the English term for it anyway?

In the context below, the word 'traverse' is slightly misleading, as this is NOT a 'cross-member', but rather, the box section that stands out from the wall. As you can see, these can be 130 or 280 mm long, so this is quite a hefty thing to support a load of around 250 kg on brackets that far out from the wall!

BUTTONS ( 4 Unités)
Ils sont constitués de :
-Une traverse en acier HEA 100 galvanisé à chaud ... de 130mm ou de 280mm
-Une plaque d’acier de dim :230mm X 150mm X 12mm d’épaisseur galvanisée à ... ( destinée à être en contact avec le support existant )
-Une plaque d’acier de dim : 100mm X 96 mm X 8mm d’épaisseur galvanisée à chaud ... ( destinée à recevoir les boulons de fixations des consoles ).
Tony M
France
Local time: 22:15
English translation:It's not Manx (TT), it's "buton"
Explanation:
compression brace - a timber, beam, etc. placed horizontally to hold two members apart. Used for trench sheeting (cut-and-cover metro tunnel construction etc.), when building the Grande Arche at La Défense, etc. etc.

That said, I'm in too much of a hurry to take in your comments above right now. Later.

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Note added at 2 hrs 53 mins (2004-07-05 16:37:43 GMT)
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Having read (and tried to understand) the context, I still don\'t see it as \"button\". If the purpose of the thing is to act as a sort of \"butée/end stop\" to prevent (whatever) slamming into the wall as it works, then \"buton\" could well apply, since it would be working in compression (when working). However, \"spacer\" (entretoise) would be sufficient in this case, I should think.

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Note added at 2 hrs 56 mins (2004-07-05 16:41:02 GMT)
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The fact that the steel plate at one end is NOT (apparently) fixed to the wall but only \"en contact avec le support existant\" - whereas the other end is to be bolted to (whatever) - indicates to me that the whole consitutes a sort of \"feeler\" protruding from (whatever) and preventing it moving laterally.

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Note added at 10 hrs 21 mins (2004-07-06 00:05:57 GMT)
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OK, we\'re agreed that it\'s a spacer, so I\'d call it that! or Or a variant thereon such as \"spacer bar, spacer beam\", maybe even \"stabilizer\".

I am assuming - given the use of \"buton\", which acts ONLY in compression and nearly always exclusively horizontally - that this spacer does not take any vertical force, i.e. it is not an outreach from the wall to support the bracket taking a vertical force, in which case I would not call it a spacer which, like \"buton\" implies a force axial to the element concerned. IF there is any vertical force, then the \"but(t)on\" and its ancillary parts forms a sort of compound bracket, in which case you could maybe call it the \"bracket arm\" or \"(bracket) outreach\" (based on the \"outreach arm, bracket arm, carrying arm - An arm that carries the luminaire of a lighting column\" [Scott]
Selected response from:

xxxBourth
Local time: 22:15
Grading comment
Thanks,Alex! Later in the text your correct spelling of 'buton' was confirmed, but I think the term is being used improperly, as there is definitely NO axial thrust involved; it is simply a stand-off or as you so sensibly suggested, outreach. In view of this terminology 'error', I'll avoid making a glossary entry...
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4It's not Manx (TT), it's "buton"xxxBourth


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
It's not Manx (TT), it's "buton"


Explanation:
compression brace - a timber, beam, etc. placed horizontally to hold two members apart. Used for trench sheeting (cut-and-cover metro tunnel construction etc.), when building the Grande Arche at La Défense, etc. etc.

That said, I'm in too much of a hurry to take in your comments above right now. Later.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 53 mins (2004-07-05 16:37:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Having read (and tried to understand) the context, I still don\'t see it as \"button\". If the purpose of the thing is to act as a sort of \"butée/end stop\" to prevent (whatever) slamming into the wall as it works, then \"buton\" could well apply, since it would be working in compression (when working). However, \"spacer\" (entretoise) would be sufficient in this case, I should think.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 56 mins (2004-07-05 16:41:02 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The fact that the steel plate at one end is NOT (apparently) fixed to the wall but only \"en contact avec le support existant\" - whereas the other end is to be bolted to (whatever) - indicates to me that the whole consitutes a sort of \"feeler\" protruding from (whatever) and preventing it moving laterally.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs 21 mins (2004-07-06 00:05:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OK, we\'re agreed that it\'s a spacer, so I\'d call it that! or Or a variant thereon such as \"spacer bar, spacer beam\", maybe even \"stabilizer\".

I am assuming - given the use of \"buton\", which acts ONLY in compression and nearly always exclusively horizontally - that this spacer does not take any vertical force, i.e. it is not an outreach from the wall to support the bracket taking a vertical force, in which case I would not call it a spacer which, like \"buton\" implies a force axial to the element concerned. IF there is any vertical force, then the \"but(t)on\" and its ancillary parts forms a sort of compound bracket, in which case you could maybe call it the \"bracket arm\" or \"(bracket) outreach\" (based on the \"outreach arm, bracket arm, carrying arm - An arm that carries the luminaire of a lighting column\" [Scott]

xxxBourth
Local time: 22:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4135
Grading comment
Thanks,Alex! Later in the text your correct spelling of 'buton' was confirmed, but I think the term is being used improperly, as there is definitely NO axial thrust involved; it is simply a stand-off or as you so sensibly suggested, outreach. In view of this terminology 'error', I'll avoid making a glossary entry...
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