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Faux filet en feuillantine tendre à la moelle et beurre rouge

English translation: red wine butter

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08:31 Aug 7, 2006
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / Menu
French term or phrase: Faux filet en feuillantine tendre à la moelle et beurre rouge
Feuillantine tendre?
A la moelle?

Beurre rouge = beurre roux = "roux" in English?

TIA.
Conor McAuley
France
Local time: 22:53
English translation:red wine butter
Explanation:
or butter and red wine

http://lutece.infos.free.fr/LutS/article.php?id_article=292

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Note added at 4 mins (2006-08-07 08:36:05 GMT)
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ps: it must have taken me 60 seconds to find beurre rouge on google!! :))

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Note added at 4 hrs (2006-08-07 12:40:04 GMT)
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http://www.hvinet.com/gallen/gloss.html
on link above à la moelle is white wine sauce with bone marrow...

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Note added at 4 hrs (2006-08-07 12:55:44 GMT)
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sorry, ignore the white wine one, I also posted (or thought that I did) a link to 'cooked in marrow fat'
Selected response from:

juliebarba
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:53
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +2red wine butter
juliebarba
4filo-wrapped sirloin with bone marrow and red wine butter (sauce)Robin Holding


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
red wine butter


Explanation:
or butter and red wine

http://lutece.infos.free.fr/LutS/article.php?id_article=292

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 mins (2006-08-07 08:36:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ps: it must have taken me 60 seconds to find beurre rouge on google!! :))

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2006-08-07 12:40:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.hvinet.com/gallen/gloss.html
on link above à la moelle is white wine sauce with bone marrow...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2006-08-07 12:55:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

sorry, ignore the white wine one, I also posted (or thought that I did) a link to 'cooked in marrow fat'

juliebarba
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:53
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 32
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Sorry, not qualified to 'agree', but certainly imagine you're right! I'd understand this as a red wine sauce flavoured and thickened with marrow and butter / cordon bl.: sm. qty marrow often used to thicken/flavour sauce / unlikely, I feel
9 mins
  -> Hi. I'd have thought that the marrow is separate as that and the sauce are listed as 2 sep. things. Although given quantity of wine in recipe I'd agree with calling it red wine & butter sauce. It's the feuillantine that's à la moelle

agree  Cervin
40 mins
  -> ta Cervin :)

agree  gad
11 days
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
filo-wrapped sirloin with bone marrow and red wine butter (sauce)


Explanation:
"En feuillantine" means it is wrapped in what the French call "bricks"; which are sheets of ultra-thin pastry similar to filo dough. "A la moelle" means "with bone marrow"; the marrow is being melted to enrich the sauce. In my opinion, the word"sauce" in the name of this dish is optional; some chefs prefer to simply name the ingredients of the sauce in the name of the dish. It depends what sounds more appetizing to you. Bon appetit!

Robin Holding
United States
Local time: 13:53
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  juliebarba: I'm not sure for the feuillantine because I put it into Google Images yesterday - came up with lots of cakes, but not the (delicious) bricks you are talking about
18 hrs
  -> Chefs do enjoy using terms creatively. For example, I once had a "Napolean de saumon" made from thin slices of salmon layered between paper-thin slices of potato. Nothing like the traditional "Napolean," a dessert made with thin layers of puff pastry.
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