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Goustier

English translation: Goustier (see explanations by myself and Jane Lamb-Ruiz)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Goustier
English translation:Goustier (see explanations by myself and Jane Lamb-Ruiz)
Entered by: 5Q
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10:46 May 23, 2002
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / Gastronomy
French term or phrase: Goustier
On the subject of gastronomy - I know this is a 'rank' in food-appreciation societies in France. Any suggestions for an equivalent or tidy explanation in English, please?
Nicky Over
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:21
Goustier
Explanation:
Intriguing term here. Anyway, I phoned the number I found on the page below and talked to a M. Bernard RIPOCHE, who kindly explained what the term means.

http://www.e-vins-aoc.com/confreries/confsaumuscnantai.html

It is in fact a Medieval title - le Grand Goustier - for the person in charge of preparing and tasting culinary dishes ('Il s'occupe de la dégustation des mets'). Obviously the term comes from the same root as goûter (the circumflex betraying what would have been an 's' in medieval French).

It is a title that ranks with Grand Argentier, Grand Maïtre and you can imagine this person being head of village banquets and an authority on local cuisine. It is today used a title in Confréreries. So, personally, I would keep the title as it is and give a brief explanation as a footnote, if necessary.

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Note added at 2002-05-23 12:44:35 (GMT)
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I disagree with Jane. When I think of taster, I imagine the poor guy who would check the King\'s food for poison! Anyway, we are not dealing with a function (goûteur), but a title. Obviously, \'taster\' is more or less what the term means today, but it doesn\'t convey the history nor the grandeur of a title which should command respect nor the pseudo-maçonic nature of organisations that keep this traditional heritage alive today. Given that gastronomy is dominated by French terms, I would keep the original and emphasise this historical aspect.
Selected response from:

5Q
Local time: 17:21
Grading comment
Thanks for your help with this. I have also e-mailed you.
Nicky Over
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3Goustier
5Q
5tastersJane Lamb-Ruiz


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
tasters


Explanation:
there are all kinds of goustiers, their are also maître goustiers.
I don't think it's a rank but rather a taster, like a wine taster. it comes from déguster.


Here's one list:
http://216.239.39.100/search?q=cache:3HGq3DO2uT8C:www.france...

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Note added at 2002-05-23 12:47:59 (GMT)
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I was wrong you are right:
Grade: Goustier, Ambassadeur, Chevalier.

Boy, am I getting a belated education in this.
These confreries can be related to food, wine, professions or a famous person. They each have their own by-laws and rules.
Here is one example for Rabelais:
L\'Ordre comporte Le Grand Gousier, le Connétable, le Chancelier, le Grand Conseiller, les Commandeurs, les Barons, les Chevaliers et les Ecuyers.

In the food and wine domain, the gustier is a member of a wine confrerie that is a taster member. I would translate in parenthesis [taster] leaving the word in French in italics.


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Note added at 2002-05-23 12:54:12 (GMT)
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HERE IT IS:
Confréries. Comme les produits qu’elles représentent, les confréries sont nombreuses : La tripière d’Or, la Confrérie du grand ordre des Calvados, la Confrérie des chevaliers du trou normand (calvados et pommeau), la confrérie de la teurgoule de Normandie, la Confrérie de la véritable Andouille de Vire, Les goustiers de Falaise (saucisson à l’ail-crépinette), l’Académie des gentes dames du pommeau, la Confrérie du Livarot, la Confrérie des chevaliers du pont-l’évêque, la Confrérie du camembert, la Confrérie gastronomique de la Marmite d’or (promotion des cuisines régionales de France), la Confrérie des fins goustiers du Pré-Bocage (terrine de campagne), et enfin, la Confrérie de la tarte aux pommes.
Chacune a ses traditions, chacune son cérémonial. Pour en faire partie, il faut le mériter et les intronisations sont autant d’occasions de faire la fête en grande pompe au produit vanté. Il n’y a pas à dire, le Calvados est le pays du bien-manger.
translation: The land of tasters,

From the above paragraph, one can see, there are many confrerie of food and wine in Normandy. That\'s why the text says its a Pays de Goustiers, A Land of Tasters

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Note added at 2002-05-23 12:56:44 (GMT)
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So this specific group, is devoted to the saucisson mentioned above but I think int he text they are referring to the fact that the region has many tasters of all sorts.
It\'s for you to decide.

Cheers

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 23
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Goustier


Explanation:
Intriguing term here. Anyway, I phoned the number I found on the page below and talked to a M. Bernard RIPOCHE, who kindly explained what the term means.

http://www.e-vins-aoc.com/confreries/confsaumuscnantai.html

It is in fact a Medieval title - le Grand Goustier - for the person in charge of preparing and tasting culinary dishes ('Il s'occupe de la dégustation des mets'). Obviously the term comes from the same root as goûter (the circumflex betraying what would have been an 's' in medieval French).

It is a title that ranks with Grand Argentier, Grand Maïtre and you can imagine this person being head of village banquets and an authority on local cuisine. It is today used a title in Confréreries. So, personally, I would keep the title as it is and give a brief explanation as a footnote, if necessary.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-23 12:44:35 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I disagree with Jane. When I think of taster, I imagine the poor guy who would check the King\'s food for poison! Anyway, we are not dealing with a function (goûteur), but a title. Obviously, \'taster\' is more or less what the term means today, but it doesn\'t convey the history nor the grandeur of a title which should command respect nor the pseudo-maçonic nature of organisations that keep this traditional heritage alive today. Given that gastronomy is dominated by French terms, I would keep the original and emphasise this historical aspect.

5Q
Local time: 17:21
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks for your help with this. I have also e-mailed you.
Nicky Over

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RHELLER: that was very kind of you
4 mins

agree  Guereau: C'est la meilleure solution.
5 mins

agree  R. A. Stegemann: admirable show, thanks for terrific research and explanation
1 hr
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