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Collier d’agneau

English translation: neck of lamb

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Collier d’agneau
English translation:neck of lamb
Entered by: sfreland
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11:33 Nov 3, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / cook book
French term or phrase: Collier d’agneau
a recipe by 3 star chef Bras called "Pièce d’agneau d’Oc rôtie" for which incidentally I would love to have suggestions!
sfreland
France
Local time: 03:37
neck of lamb
Explanation:
Pretty well-known cut/dish...
Selected response from:

Rimas Balsys
Local time: 18:37
Grading comment
thanks to all!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +14neck of lambRimas Balsys
4Neck filletJOHN A
3 +1best end of lamb neckPTeale
Summary of reference entries provided
Neck fillet vs middle neck vs best end
Tony M

Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +14
neck of lamb


Explanation:
Pretty well-known cut/dish...

Rimas Balsys
Local time: 18:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
thanks to all!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  carolynf
4 mins

agree  Enza Longo
4 mins

agree  kashew
6 mins

agree  Tony M: See illustration on this site for FR lamb cuts: http://www.civ-viande.org/5-39-gastronomie-agneau.html
6 mins

agree  PTeale: Sorry, I was busy posting my answer so didn't see yours.
7 mins

agree  Kate Hudson
38 mins

agree  Jocelyn Fong
1 hr

agree  emiledgar
1 hr

agree  lundy
1 hr

agree  Nina Iordache: http://www.medisite.fr/medisite/Le-collier-d-agneau.html
1 hr

agree  NancyLynn
2 hrs

agree  bookwormkt: It is delicious when cooked long and slow. My late mother, who was from Wales, taught me her recipe years ago.
9 hrs

agree  Cervin
9 hrs

agree  jean-jacques alexandre
4 days
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
best end of lamb neck


Explanation:
I think that is what collier d'agneau is, technically but it's not normally a great joint for roasting, more for stews, I thought.

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Note added at 25 mins (2008-11-03 11:58:55 GMT)
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Given Tony's point, I think this would be better as "Best end of neck of lamb" - lots of google hits confirm that.

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Note added at 28 mins (2008-11-03 12:02:00 GMT)
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There's a picture here of where different cuts come from http://www.theeveninginn.com/recipearticledisplay.aspx?artic...

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Note added at 42 mins (2008-11-03 12:15:22 GMT)
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The same site describes the different bits of neck and only "best end" is suitable for roasting see as follows:
"Best End of Neck
This is a versatile cut and comes from between the middle neck and loin (see the diagram). It’s great for braising or roasting on the bone. Two famous roasts come from the best end of neck: the crown roast and the guard of honour. Give the butcher a few days notice and he’ll prepare these very extravagant and impressive roasts for you.

Middle Neck
This cut comes from between the best end of neck and the scrag end. It is really only suitable for braising because of it’s fat content.


Scrag End of Neck
This cut comes from the nearest the head. It is only sold already chopped for casseroling and braising. As it contains a lot of bone and gristle, it is a relatively cheap cut and needs very slow cooking for a very long time to make it tender.

PTeale
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:37
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: But there is a serious flaw here: what you are describing is perfectly correct, of course, but is NOT actually the same cut as 'collier'; what you're describing (and yr ref. shows) is called 'côtes découvertes' in FR
1 min
  -> No, because it is the best end of the neck, not of the lamb. If it was already made clear elsewhere that it was lamb that was referred to, then we'd just say "best end of neck" (that's what the celebrity chef Delia Smith calls it)

neutral  kashew: I know we say that in Blighty but for a French 3 Michelin* menu it is the best by definition.
13 mins
  -> Sorry but there is a big difference between "best end of neck" and "scrag", which is the "bad" end of neck

agree  Jenny Forbes: It's called "best end of neck (of lamb) in the UK, an excellent cut. "Scrag end" is used for long, slow cooking, such as Irish stew. Cuts of meat (and their names) vary greatly from one country to another.
59 mins
  -> Thanks, Jenny, yes I agree it should be "best end of neck of lamb", rather than best end of lamb neck - I changed it in my notes earlier.

agree  Anne C: agree with Jenny
2 hrs

neutral  JOHN A: Best end = carré. It is nowhere near the neck...
3 hrs
  -> I didn't say "best end" but "best end of neck" which, is a well known joint in the UK and, amazingly enough, comes from one end of the neck
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Neck fillet


Explanation:
That's what it is called in the UK. I use it a lot, especially when cooking tajines...

JOHN A
France
Local time: 03:37
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4
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Reference comments


4 hrs
Reference: Neck fillet vs middle neck vs best end

Reference information:
According to this rather interesting video, the 'neck fillet' suggested by John is in fact a sub-cut from the 'middle neck' — and the distinction is also clearly made between this cut and the 'best end fillet'

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Note added at 4 hrs (2008-11-03 15:54:54 GMT)
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And maybe this is also of interest: 'French-trimmed middle neck of lamb'

http://www.caterersearch.com/Articles/2008/06/12/321460/vide...

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Note added at 4 hrs (2008-11-03 16:01:59 GMT)
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And here is a PDF file that explains the cuts of lamb in a slightly different way:

http://www.caterersearch.com/Assets/GetAsset.aspx?ItemID=177...


    Reference: http://www.caterersearch.com/Articles/2008/06/12/321461/vide...
Tony M
France
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 382
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