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Parisienne

English translation: Parisienne Fruit Tart

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14:29 Feb 24, 2009
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary / restaurant menu
French term or phrase: Parisienne
This appears on the Cheese & Dessert menu of a Paris hotel restaurant, as :

« Parisienne » du moment 15 euros

Other items on the menu include crême brûlée, macaroons and a chocolate moelleux.

I just don't know if this refers to a specific type of dessert, something generic, or something this restaurant has made up. The only thing I've come up with so far is a translation as "miniature pastries", but no idea if that is a decent translation. I'm thinking maybe "special pastry dessert of the day".

Any ideas ?

Thanks a lot foodies!
Philippa
Local time: 22:10
English translation:Parisienne Fruit Tart
Explanation:
low confidence rating, simply because these Parisiennes could in theory be almost anything - I would however stick my neck out, by not translating "Parisienne" - which sounds far more inviting to me than "Parisian", and retains the exoticism so often seen on menus.

Anyway, for what it's worth, here's recipe for the fruit tart

http://recipes.recipeland.com/recipes/recipe/show/Parisienne...

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Note added at 1 day18 hrs (2009-02-26 09:03:48 GMT) Post-grading
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Thanks Philippa - any time! And I think it's a wise move not to specify what the recipe is, which merely would be guessing.
In your situation, I might possibly consider something like "Parisienne Special", and leave it to the waiter to explain what this entails - something they seem to love doing, and a pleasure that I never deprive them of.
Selected response from:

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:10
Grading comment
Thanks for the suggestion and all the discussion Carol, all very helpful. I didn't use the "fruit tart" as just couldn't be sure, but stuck with the 'Parisinne'. Thanks again!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
2 +4Parisienne Fruit Tart
Carol Gullidge
3Flan parisienne (sweet custard tart)Valerie SYKES
3Gâteau parisienne (merinque-covered sponge cake layered with frangipane cream)Valerie SYKES


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Gâteau parisienne (merinque-covered sponge cake layered with frangipane cream)


Explanation:
'Parisienne' seems to be used for the special way of cooking a number of mainly savoury dishes.
However, there is a 'gâteau parisienne' - merinque covered sponge cake layered with frangipane cream.
In this sort of case, I keep the French name and put a brief description after it between brackets.
I don't know what 'du moment' would mean in this context, but it's the only sweet 'Parisienne' that I could find.
When I'm translating menus I phone up the restaurant if anything needs clarification, just to be certain.

Valerie SYKES
France
Local time: 22:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks a lot for your suggestuibs Valerie. As you found yourself, it could be so many different things! The job was for an agency, and I told them to ask the client, but there's been no feedback. And I can't contact the client direct as against agency rules! Thanks again for your input.

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19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Flan parisienne (sweet custard tart)


Explanation:
After doing more research on Google, I found several entries for this particular dessert.
However, I also found entries for 'tarte au flan à la Parisienne', 'tarte au chocolat à la Parisienne', and 'gâteau de crèpes à la Parisienne'.
If it's on the menu it needs a translation/explanation. Why not phone the restaurant and get the answer straight from the horse's mouth?



Valerie SYKES
France
Local time: 22:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Parisienne Fruit Tart


Explanation:
low confidence rating, simply because these Parisiennes could in theory be almost anything - I would however stick my neck out, by not translating "Parisienne" - which sounds far more inviting to me than "Parisian", and retains the exoticism so often seen on menus.

Anyway, for what it's worth, here's recipe for the fruit tart

http://recipes.recipeland.com/recipes/recipe/show/Parisienne...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day18 hrs (2009-02-26 09:03:48 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks Philippa - any time! And I think it's a wise move not to specify what the recipe is, which merely would be guessing.
In your situation, I might possibly consider something like "Parisienne Special", and leave it to the waiter to explain what this entails - something they seem to love doing, and a pleasure that I never deprive them of.

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 50
Grading comment
Thanks for the suggestion and all the discussion Carol, all very helpful. I didn't use the "fruit tart" as just couldn't be sure, but stuck with the 'Parisinne'. Thanks again!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jennifer White: agree that's probably what it is. Would call it Fruit Tart Parisienne though!/ But it must be either translated or an English explanation given. As I see it, leaving it solves nothing.
4 mins
  -> many thanks Jennifer - I think I would too!

agree  jean-jacques alexandre: Would just leave it as such & let the waiter/ress do his/her bit & earn a well deserved tip
32 mins
  -> many thanks Jean-Jacques! Actually, I think that's by far the safest bet: to leave it as it is. And I always think the waiters actually enjoy having to explain the desserts...

agree  Jenn Mercer: I agree with Jennifer that the inversion should be maintained.
1 hr
  -> many thanks Jenn!

agree  Colin Morley: Keep 'Parisienne' - much more sexy for 15 Euros than fruit tart!
2 hrs
  -> many thanks Colin! Yes, I agree about retaining "Parisienne", and also agree with J-J that it would be a gd idea to leave it at that, and not try to guess what it consists of.
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