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faites marcher

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12:52 Sep 26, 2011
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
French term or phrase: faites marcher
Hi,

I am looking for the English translation of the expression "faites marcher" said in French restaurant kitchens (to announce that the cooks can prepare the next meal). I cannot find it anywhere, please help! Thanks!
Fanni Lavigerie
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Summary of answers provided
4 +1cc in nyc
4 +1away
Sarah Bessioud
4you can start itemiledgar
2On with the/Get started withMatthewLaSon


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
you can start it


Explanation:
This is what we said in the restaurants I worked in in the US but there may be a jargon phrase that we weren't aware of.

emiledgar
Belgium
Local time: 23:40
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 69
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
On with the/Get started with


Explanation:
Hello,

Just a guess...


I hope this helps.

MatthewLaSon
Local time: 17:40
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Not really the kind of jargon you'd hear in a restaurant kitchen, I don't think. Ah, but are you a professional chef, or have you worked in a professional kitchen? Asker is not asking for just "any old term that will do", but if there is a standard term
45 mins
  -> Sounds fine to me. "On with the steaks" or "Get started with the cornbread" LOL. I don't think there is just one term for this. Unless someone can think of "THE" special term (if there is one), there are many options.
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
away


Explanation:
This is the common expression for ask chefs to begin preparing food in the UK, otherwise known as calling food away. Starters away, mains away, desserts away etc for table XX.

"Mains away chef, table 1!" for example.

http://website.tevalis.com/Messaging-facility.html
Kitchen staff will also be alerted when courses are required through our course away messaging which allows for quick communication with kitchen staff using starters away/mains away/deserts away/coffees away allowing for an increased speed of service during busy service periods.

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Note added at 8 hrs (2011-09-26 21:44:24 GMT)
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http://www.onehungrychef.com/2008/11/small-fish.html
As meat comes on order, I start to cook it immediately, so that while the customers are eating their first course, their steak is cooking and resting in a warm place. When they are “called away,” that is, ready for their mains, the meat has become perfectly tender and moist, and no one has to wait too long for their meal. Subsequently, on top of calling dockets, plating hot entrées, and directing the waiters, I was now trying to keep track of a dozen or so steaks on my grill.

Table by table the starters went out and, suddenly, or what seemed like suddenly, there was nothing. The printer had stopped, we had all the entrées out, and all the steaks were resting. And not a single table had been called away...

...These, at any rate, were the thoughts firing around in my brain in those free-fall seconds before it all began to happen. Tick, tick-tick, tick, tick. “MAINS AWAY 616! MAINS AWAY 201! MAINS AWAY 314!”

Sarah Bessioud
Germany
Local time: 23:40
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 43

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Philippa
18 mins
  -> Thank you Philippa

neutral  Melissa McMahon: Is this the same thing? It sounds like "away" is an order to finish preparing a dish, not start preparing it.
9 hrs

neutral  cc in nyc: agree with Melissa; this sounds like the order is ready for pickup, ready to be served
8 days
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58 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1


Explanation:
In the USA – at least IMO – the order is just called out. But that's also what Larousse shows:

6. [au restaurant] faites marcher deux œufs au plat! two fried eggs!
http://www.larousse.com/en/dictionaries/french-english/faite...

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Note added at 18 days (2011-10-14 19:59:22 GMT)
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If you must have something in the English for this expression, it would be

start

as in "start two fried eggs!"

cc in nyc
Local time: 17:40
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Melissa McMahon
9 hrs
  -> Thank you.
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