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piquées au romarin

English translation: spiked with rosemary

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:piquées au romarin
English translation:spiked with rosemary
Entered by: Louisa T.
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11:04 Feb 22, 2012
French to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Cooking / Culinary / basic cooking terminology
French term or phrase: piquées au romarin
Hello,

I need help for "piqué au"

"...avant de céder à la tentation de pommes de ris de veau piquées au romarin..."

before succumbing to sweetbread medallion......with rosemary


Thank you
Louisa T.
Tunisia
Local time: 06:33
spiked with rosemary
Explanation:
www.deliciousmagazine.co.uk/articles/wines-to-match-roast-lamb
"This is a real treat with roast lamb spiked with rosemary. "
Selected response from:

B D Finch
France
Local time: 07:33
Grading comment
Thank you
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +10spiked with rosemary
B D Finch
4 +6studded with rosemary
Sarah Bessioud
3 +3spiked
LauretteT


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +10
spiked with rosemary


Explanation:
www.deliciousmagazine.co.uk/articles/wines-to-match-roast-lamb
"This is a real treat with roast lamb spiked with rosemary. "

B D Finch
France
Local time: 07:33
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 43
Grading comment
Thank you

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Wendy Streitparth: mouth-watering!
1 min
  -> Thanks Wendy - Only for you carnivores!

agree  Carol Gullidge: first by a whisker, plus you posted a supporting link
3 mins
  -> Thanks Carol

agree  Tony M
6 mins
  -> Thanks Tony

agree  Penny Hewson
7 mins
  -> Thanks Penny

agree  Mark Nathan: Although strictly speaking you can only spike drinks with alcohol, or impale something on a spike... I suppose they could mean little sprigs of rosemary have been stuck into the sweetbreads.
15 mins
  -> Thanks Mark. I am sure it does literally mean sticking sprigs of rosemary into the food, not sprinkling leaves. Not to be confused with the other meaning of spike that you mention.

agree  Philippa
19 mins
  -> Thanks Philippa

agree  JaneD
35 mins
  -> Thanks Jane

neutral  writeaway: studded gets far more ghits. seems to be the going term/spiked immediately conjures up drinks. Studded conjures up cloves.....
47 mins
  -> They both get thousands of ghits, so are both "going terms". But, half the "studded" results are due to "studded with rosemary and garlic". Personal choice perhaps, but I tend to think of studs having smooth tops, unlike sprigs of rosemary.

neutral  Sheila Wilson: spiked for long, sharp things; studded for short, blunt things, IMO
52 mins
  -> I'd go along with that, though studs can be sharp things with rounded tops. The rosemary in my garden has quite sharp woody stems below the softer tips.

agree  NancyLynn: I agree with this term for all the reasons given on this page
1 hr
  -> Thanks Nancy

agree  Miranda Joubioux: cf my comment below
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Miranda

agree  emiledgar
5 hrs
  -> Thanks emile
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
spiked


Explanation:
spiked with rosmary

LauretteT
France
Local time: 07:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Wendy Streitparth: it was simultaneous
1 min
  -> thanks Wendy

agree  Philippa: as Wendy says...
20 mins
  -> thanks dunno how they do it! LOL

agree  emiledgar
5 hrs
  -> thank Emile
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
studded with rosemary


Explanation:
Studded with rosemary or rosemary-studded

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/402619/roast-lamb-studded...
Roast lamb studded with rosemary & garlic


Sarah Bessioud
Germany
Local time: 07:33
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 43

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Personally, I prefer 'spiked' and would reserve 'studded' for things like cloves
6 mins
  -> Thanks Tony. It's all a matter of taste, after all.

agree  Claire Cox: I prefer studded, I must say!
13 mins
  -> Thank you Claire

neutral  B D Finch: I think that, given that you can't spike lamb with blunt cloves of garlic, they economised on verbs.
26 mins

agree  Gilla Evans: This is the term I have seen most often.
39 mins

agree  writeaway: only 43000 ghits. basic cooking terminology I'd have thought
45 mins

neutral  Sheila Wilson: I too would reserve this for garlic, cloves, peppercorns etc i.e. short, blunt things
49 mins

agree  Miranda Joubioux: I think they can both be used and it's a matter of personal preference. Personally I 'rub' my lamb with rosemary, it's much tastier!
2 hrs

agree  Yolanda Broad: Studded is the term that I'm most used to
3 hrs

agree  Gallagy
6 hrs
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Voters for reclassification
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PRO / non-PRO
Non-PRO (1): Gallagy


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Changes made by editors
Feb 22, 2012 - Changes made by writeaway:
Field (write-in)French cuisine » basic cooking terminology


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