KudoZ home » French to English » Cooking / Culinary

snaké

English translation: lightly seared

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:snacké
English translation:lightly seared
Entered by: Tony M
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

11:21 Feb 28, 2012
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
French term or phrase: snaké
This term crops up in a menu from a Corsican restaurant (high-class). It is part of the following dish: "Thon rouge de méditerranée de pêche locale snaké et sa sauce vierge".

While I am aware that culinary terms are often left in French, I just wonder if leaving 'snaké' would be a wise decision. I have no idea what it means and so can't even supply a gloss. Has anyone got any idea of how to handle this term? It doesn't even look all that French to me, but if it's a borrowed word then it's a new one to me.

Any help greatly appreciated.
David Hayes
France
Local time: 18:33
lightly seared
Explanation:
It should really be spelt 'snacké', and of course it's derived (inaccurately!) from the EN word 'snack' — it is a professional culinary term, and just means very quickly seared, for example, on the hotplate, as one might do with thin slices of bacon, etc. Just to seal the surface, as would probably be the case with this tuna... dangerous not to heat it right through, but then it is also served in tartare!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 minutes (2012-02-28 11:48:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It has to be said that 'snacker' reflects probably the minimum amount of cooking ever used — a quick flip on the hotplate ;-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 heures (2012-02-28 14:36:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Kashew's reference speaks of 'snacker' salmons steaks, and there the cooking is 3–4 mins per side, which stirkes me as rather longer than I am used to for the term 'snacker'; but I guess each chef has her/his own criteria...
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 18:33
Grading comment
Thanks again.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +6lightly seared
Tony M
4a la planchaFrench Foodie
Summary of reference entries provided
Snacking (or snaking)
kashew

  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
a la plancha


Explanation:
A "planche a snacker" is a plancha or flattop grill

http://cuisine-des-pros.com/2.aspx?CategID=6eb5cda0-8442-429...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 mins (2012-02-28 11:28:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"a la plancha" is often used in English to describe this method of cooking

e.g.
Calamari a la Plancha
gourmetfood.about.com/b/2009/08/26/calamari-a-la-plancha.htm25 Aug 2009 – "A la plancha" refers to the method of cooking on a metal plate, in this case a cast iron skillet. This Spanish-inspired calamari dish is a little on ...

French Foodie
Local time: 18:33
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 131

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Although it might be done on a 'plancha', I can't help feeling this might imply a greater degree of cooking.
1 min
  -> You may well be right Tony, but I must admit the only time I've ever seen snacker on a high-end restaurant menu, it's been done on this type of grill. But your suggestion of "lightly seared" sounds very appetizing and is surely a safe bet.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
snacké
lightly seared


Explanation:
It should really be spelt 'snacké', and of course it's derived (inaccurately!) from the EN word 'snack' — it is a professional culinary term, and just means very quickly seared, for example, on the hotplate, as one might do with thin slices of bacon, etc. Just to seal the surface, as would probably be the case with this tuna... dangerous not to heat it right through, but then it is also served in tartare!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 minutes (2012-02-28 11:48:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It has to be said that 'snacker' reflects probably the minimum amount of cooking ever used — a quick flip on the hotplate ;-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 heures (2012-02-28 14:36:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Kashew's reference speaks of 'snacker' salmons steaks, and there the cooking is 3–4 mins per side, which stirkes me as rather longer than I am used to for the term 'snacker'; but I guess each chef has her/his own criteria...

Tony M
France
Local time: 18:33
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 382
Grading comment
Thanks again.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Tony. As so often, we can rely on you to come up with the goods! The translation has gone off with 'lightly seared' as the rendering of this term. The term was spelt in my document as given in the question, so it may be a typo. The points will be yours within a day or so.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  MoiraB: local restaurant near me (Provence) is fond of using this term, but 'snacké', as you point out.
6 mins
  -> Thanks, Moira! It's a cooking instruction Chef often gives to me, so I know exactly what it involves ;-)

agree  Carla Balaita
17 mins
  -> Thanks, Carla!

agree  kashew
52 mins
  -> Thanks, J! I think this is probably the least contentious meaning, don't you? ;-)

agree  Philippa: Useful to know - living and learning!
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Philippa!

agree  Mark Nathan: but can anyone explain the origin of this word?
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Mark! I think it simply comes from the quick-fry-and-serve of things like beefburgers that are served in snack outlets.

agree  Sheila Wilson: It's a real buzz word currently on the Top Chef series, along with "revisité" (snacké = didn't have time to do it properly, "revisité" = don't know how to do it properly)
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Sheila! Cynic! But I do agree — it very much has the connotation of 'do it quickly'. My boyf wouldn't be happy at your def. of 'revisité' (one of his favourite terms!) I did a 'moussaka revisité' one day which was a great success!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Reference comments


59 mins peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: Snacking (or snaking)

Reference information:
e.g. faire chauffer une poile anti-adhérente et y snacker les pavé de poisson dans le beurre clarifié pendant 3 à 4 minutes de chaque coté (ca dépend de l’épaisseur des pavés), en arrosant régulièrement les pavés avec le beurre.

kashew
France
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 19

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Tony M: Nice one, J!
10 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Feb 29, 2012 - Changes made by Tony M:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/1077989">David Hayes's</a> old entry - "snaké" » "lightly seared"


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search