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beurre pâtissier

English translation: concentrated butter

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:beurre pâtissier
English translation:concentrated butter
Entered by: Mark Nathan
Options:
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19:00 Nov 16, 2013
French to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
French term or phrase: beurre pâtissier
Composition: beurre pâtissier
Silvina Gospodinova
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:43
concentrated butter
Explanation:
It is butter with a lower water content.
Selected response from:

Mark Nathan
France
Local time: 12:43
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5concentrated butter
Mark Nathan
4patissier butterGallagy
4premium butter
Lorraine Dubuc
3high fat content butter for baking
Tony M
Summary of reference entries provided
Wafflings
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
ref.
Rachel Fell
if one looks on the www...........
writeaway

Discussion entries: 11





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
concentrated butter


Explanation:
It is butter with a lower water content.

Mark Nathan
France
Local time: 12:43
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 168
Grading comment
Thank you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: I don't like the term 'concentrated', and as W/A's ref. indicates, this may CONTAIN 'concentrated butter', but that's not what it actually IS. / Sadly, Rachel's ref. refers to ACTUAL concentrated butter, NOT this stuff!
42 mins

agree  Rachel Fell: despite dearth of context: http://www.dooyoo.co.uk/snacks/sainsbury-s-butter-brioche-ro...
4 hrs

agree  writeaway: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/site/en/consleg/2005/R/0... http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:...
14 hrs

agree  GILOU: C'est bien çà en français.....
14 hrs

agree  mchd: cela correspond bien à la définition de ce beurre
15 hrs

agree  xxxGuillaumeT: EU regulations use "concentrated butter". http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CONSLE... vs. http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CONSLE...
1 day14 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
premium butter


Explanation:
'Both cultured and uncultured butter types may also be premium, or European-style, meaning the butterfat content is extra-high. Premium butter is a pastry baker’s best friend. '

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Note added at 4 heures (2013-11-16 23:54:43 GMT)
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For those of you who want imperatively European references, here is premium butter from Europe :-)

http://www.saumweber.biz/images/stories/pdf/e_premium butter...

Example sentence(s):
  • 'Both cultured and uncultured butter types may also be premium, or European-style, meaning the butterfat content is extra-high. Premium butter is a pastry baker’s best friend. '

    Reference: http://www.organicvalley.coop/recipes/features/butter-up-a-p...
Lorraine Dubuc
Canada
Local time: 06:43
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: That may work in your country, but wouldn't be understandable in, for example, the UK, where other types of 'premium butter' are available; this almost seems to describe 'ordinary' European butter!
1 hr
  -> I have a link from Germany with exactly the same reference to the same butter: premium butter :-) http://www.saumweber.biz/images/stories/pdf/e_premium butter...

neutral  Gallagy: agree with Tony. "premium" is too vague. You haven't understood his comment about you looking at this "from a transatlantic perspective"
4 hrs
  -> well that is indeed what is used in the litterature about the subject (visit links :-)
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
patissier butter


Explanation:
quite simply

http://lechef.be/index.cfm?Content_ID=703768099.html

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Note added at 6 hrs (2013-11-17 01:19:27 GMT)
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"Patissier" is a well-known and used term but you could keep the French term and add in brackets "High butter-fat content"

NOTE it is not just high fat (as Tony has suggested) BUT high butter-fat content


here's a UK ref.
http://www.callbakolondon.com/chilled/butter-and-soft-margar...
http://www.callbakolondon.com/contact/



Gallagy
Ireland
Local time: 11:43
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 27

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: I think that's a non-translation cop-out, and not a term that would be widely understood in an EN-speaking context; note your ref is from BE.
30 mins
  -> not a cop-out at all. See note above.

neutral  Lorraine Dubuc: I don't like Frenglish very much
5 hrs
  -> I lived in Quebec so I know what you mean and neither do I but "patissier" is a word commonly used and understood in English.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
high fat content butter for baking


Explanation:
I am not aware of the specific technical term used in EN (if indeed there is one), but I feel this would be an accurate and not too clumsy description of what it actually is.

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Note added at 13 hrs (2013-11-17 08:46:45 GMT)
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As G2 correctly points out, it should of course be 'high butterfat content', but in view of Asker's context of an ingredients list, I felt it unnecessary and clumsy to repeat 'butter' twice.

Do let's please note that 'high butterfat content' is NOT the same as 'concentrated butter', which is a product that has been processed, and then has to be reconstituted afterwards — even though the meanings sound in everyday language as if they ought to be the same!

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Note added at 22 hrs (2013-11-17 17:26:51 GMT)
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Goodness, the plot (if not the butter!) thickens!
According to this manufacturer's documentation (in FR):

http://www.lactalischf.fr/visuels/fiches_techniques/37516.pd...

their own 'beurre pâtissier' is indeed 'concentrated butter' — BUT their product package label in EN reads 'anhydrous milk fat'; getta load of that!

HOWEVER, it just might be that this is the term Asker needs for her ingredients list: short, succinct, and sounds suitably technical!

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Note added at 3 days2 hrs (2013-11-19 21:34:52 GMT)
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Quoting the reference kindly found by sbgaut:

http://terroirs.denfrance.free.fr/p/fiches_pratiques/beurre....

After having separately mentioned 'beurre concentré', it goes on to say:

"Il existe également un beurre commercialisé sous le nom de "beurre pâtissier-glacier" ou "beurre pâtissier". C'est un beurre subventionné et constitué à 25% de beurre reconstitué."

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Note added at 3 days2 hrs (2013-11-19 21:36:52 GMT)
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It does also talk about the "Matière Grasse Laitière Anhydre (MGLA)" which the other manufacturer I mentioned refers to in EN as 'anhydrous milk fat', and which I think would be the most appropriate term for a list of ingredients — cf. things like 'hydrogenated vegetable oil' etc.

Tony M
France
Local time: 12:43
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 382

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Gallagy: not just "high fat" but high butter-fat content.
4 hrs
  -> Well, yes, but I was trying to keep it as short as possible for Askers ingredients list :-(
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Reference comments


22 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: Wafflings

Reference information:
Not quite sure that strictly speaking "beurre pâtissier" and "-concentré" are the one and the same :http://www.sante.gouv.fr/IMG/pdf/Presentation_lipides_produi... (Cf. Slide 9)


Can even end up in court : http://www.juricaf.org/arret/FRANCE-COURADMINISTRATIVEDAPPEL...

"Beurre concentré" appears to have a minimum fat content of 99.8% :
http://www.dgf.fr/francais/produit/txt_sup/06127.txt
"Si le beurre provenant de l’intervention est transformé en beurre
concentré, la totalié du beurre attribué doit être transformée en beure
concentré d’une teneur minimale en matières grasses de 99,8 % et doit
fournir au minimum 100 kilogrammes de beurre concentré par 122,5
kilogrammes de beurre utilisé."

Is this the same thing as "beurre patissier"?

There are also references to "beurre-pâtissier-glacier" thus, I suppose, used in the making of pâtisserie and ice-cream. If it is in fact "beurre concentré" transformed in one particular way for pâtisserie and in another for ice-cream, are we then talking about the same thing?






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Note added at 22 hrs (2013-11-17 17:03:19 GMT)
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http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CONSLE...

For the CE reguation 2571/97.

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Note added at 22 hrs (2013-11-17 17:03:32 GMT)
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Article 5.

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Note added at 22 hrs (2013-11-17 17:04:16 GMT)
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Scratch the DGF reference, which should be the eur-lex one. AN editing eerror. Sorry.

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Note added at 22 hrs (2013-11-17 17:08:29 GMT)
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http://terroirs.denfrance.free.fr/p/fiches_pratiques/beurre....

And indeed, different types of "beurre concentré":
http://www.beuralia.fr/Beuralia/sa_indus.aspx?site=BEURALI&l...

From which it would appear that "beurre pâtissier" is in fact a substype :
-Beurres traditionnels 82% MG
Beurre 82%MG
Beurre 82%MG « frais »
Beurre 82%MG Biologique
Beurre 82%MG Bretagne

-Beurre texturé 82%MG
Beurre texturé HPR : Homogène Plastique Régulier 82%MG

-Beurres concentrés 99,8%MG
Beurre concentré quatre-quart
Beurre concentré Pâtissier

- Beurres concentrés à Point de Fusion Spécifique
Beurre concentré croissant-feuilletage PF 36-38°C
Beurre concentré liquide à T°C ambiante PF 9-10°C
Beurre concentré haut PF 42°C
Beurre concentré à PF spécifique PF22 à PF35°C

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Note added at 22 hrs (2013-11-17 17:10:33 GMT)
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http://www.easydroit.fr/jurisprudence/Cours-administratives-...

It would be helpful to have some decent context here!

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Note added at 1 day25 mins (2013-11-17 19:25:12 GMT)
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http://www.francemagazine.org/articles/issue78/article156.as...

Maybe consider using the French?

"BEURRE PÂTISSIER Also known as beurre concentré and beurre pasteurisé déshydraté, it contains no water and has a 99.8 percent fat content, compared with the 80 to 82 percent fat content of regular butter. Using this butter requires the addition of water to recipes."

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Tony M: No further context really needed, Nikki: everyone in the trade here knows what it is. 'beurre pâtissier' is more concentrated than usual, but isn't necessarily what we call 'concentrated butter' in EN — whence the problem.
13 mins
  -> I see your point, but I was trying to make a distinction, as if there is one, and it's used, then it may help in determining the solution. Or then again not! ;-). It is not, for example, a "beurre concentré à PFS", but I digress.
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1 day16 hrs
Reference: ref.

Reference information:
BEURRE PÂTISSIER Also known as beurre concentré and beurre pasteurisé déshydraté, it contains no water and has a 99.8 percent fat content, compared with the 80 to 82 percent fat content of regular butter. Using this butter requires the addition of water to recipes.

http://www.francemagazine.org/articles/issue78/article156.as...

PÂTISSIER est un beurre concentré destiné spécialement à la confection des pâtes levées et brioches.

http://www.lechef.be/index.cfm?Content_ID=263273451.html

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 80
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1 hr peer agreement (net): +5
Reference: if one looks on the www...........

Reference information:
Beurre Pâtissier" is butter that is 99.8% butterfat made specially for raised pastries, cakes, brioches, and choux pastry. It is made through centrifugal force that forces out almost all water and milk solids other than fat. It will be 25% reconstituted butter (butter derived from concentrated butter.)
http://www.cooksinfo.com/beurre-patissier



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Note added at 6 hrs (2013-11-17 01:22:14 GMT)
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Le beurre concentré (ou beurre pâtissier)

Dans ce beurre, on a éliminé par fonte douce, décantation, centrifugation pratiquement toute l'eau et la matière sèche non grasse. Il contient au minimum 99,8% de matière grasse laitière anhydre (MGLA).
http://www.maison-du-lait.com/fr/les-produits-lait/beurres

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Note added at 2 days22 hrs (2013-11-19 17:09:06 GMT)
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BEURRE PÂTISSIER Also known as beurre concentré and beurre pasteurisé déshydraté, it contains no water and has a 99.8 percent fat content, compared with the 80 to 82 percent fat content of regular butter. Using this butter requires the addition of water to recipes.
http://www.francemagazine.org/articles/issue78/article156.as...

writeaway
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 78

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Tony M: Brilliant research ;-)
44 mins
agree  philgoddard
1 hr
agree  Rachel Fell: ;-) http://www.dhaeze.be/boter.php?language=engels - and the rest...;-)
4 hrs
  -> love the Dunglish bakker's butter /Wow, yes, it's 100% Dungish! Happens a lot. A native NL speaker has translated French directly into Dunglish. Butter with a savoury parfume. Words run together NL style (butterproducts). All so typical.
agree  EvaVer: yes, of course, but in English? waterless butter?
12 hrs
  -> concentrated butter. It's also official EU speak.
agree  Mark Nathan: Yes, it has a different consistency at different temperatures compared to normal butter. I remember a French pastry chef who would use it for his puff pastry and delighted in giving me a knowing wink as if it was some kind of trick.
15 hrs
neutral  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: A number of sources do suggest that "beurre concentré" and "-pâtissier" are synonymous. Hwvr, if they are, I don't see how it can be "derived from concentrated butter" and yet synonymous.//See what you mean, but I was basing this comm on your first source
20 hrs
  -> well, it's not a one-off. what is derived from concentrated butter? Asker provides NO context whatsoever. The question refers to something made with this butter. I think it's important not start to introduce confusion unnecessarily.
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Non-PRO (1): Gallagy


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Changes made by editors
Nov 30, 2013 - Changes made by Mark Nathan:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term
Nov 16, 2013 - Changes made by Tony M:
Field (specific)Food & Drink » Cooking / Culinary


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