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faire suer, ciselé

English translation: sweat/finely chopped

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:faire suer, ciselé
English translation:sweat/finely chopped
Entered by: N.M. Eklund
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15:02 Nov 30, 2004
French to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Cooking / Culinary
French term or phrase: faire suer, ciselé
Recipe for barigoule:

"Faites SUER l'échalotte CISELEE dans l'huile d'olive."

I know what they mean, but I need to find a good term in English.
Also, for ciselée, I wonder if you can use another term besides, hashed or minced.

Thanks

ps, let me know if there is a translation for BARIGOULE, all the recipes I've found use the French term.
N.M. Eklund
France
Local time: 04:44
sweat/finely chopped
Explanation:
sweat the finely chopped/finely diced shallot in the olive oil
Selected response from:

Paul Lambert
United States
Local time: 19:44
Grading comment
Thank you, Paul for all your help. The big question was, is sweat used enough outside professional kitchens to be understood by a general public. I got my answer!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +10sweat/finely chopped
Paul Lambert
4 -1just ideas from Provence: suer, could be gently simmer
cjohnstone


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +10
faire suer, ciselé
sweat/finely chopped


Explanation:
sweat the finely chopped/finely diced shallot in the olive oil

Paul Lambert
United States
Local time: 19:44
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you, Paul for all your help. The big question was, is sweat used enough outside professional kitchens to be understood by a general public. I got my answer!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RHELLER: sweat is what I would put
1 min
  -> thanks Rita!

agree  Orla Ryan
4 mins
  -> cheers Orla!

agree  Sara Freitas: Finely chopped sounds good IMO; I prefer minced to diced, although maybe minced is *really* small, like for dressings and marinades...
5 mins
  -> Thanks Sara!

agree  Richard Benham: You can't dice chives--it means to cut in cubes. "Minced" and "finely chopped" are near-sysnonyms. "Sweat" is fine in pretentious foodie jargon.//OOPS! But you can't dice shallots either! (Maybe just the white bit...)
13 mins
  -> i know you can't dice chives! didn't suggest anyone should - this one is shallots. ;o)

agree  Claire Cox: sweat and finely chopped would be my choices - definitely not pretentious, just the sort of thing good old Delia would say....
1 hr
  -> indeed - good old Delia!

agree  Aisha Maniar
1 hr
  -> thanks aisha!

agree  Ian Burley
1 hr
  -> thanks!

agree  Victoria Bryan: I don't think 'sweat' is pretentious! finely chopped is perfect. Minced is mainly for meat, n'est-ce pas?
1 hr
  -> agree with you on that one Victoria!

agree  MoiraB: sweat chopped or finely chopped shallots. Sweat is a perfectly common term in cooking (try googling for 'sweat shallots') + just means fry gently in butter or oil. eg http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database/sauteacuteedwildm...
2 hrs

agree  Tony M: 'sweat' is very common in cooking; 'finely chopped' is perfect for shallots
20 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
just ideas from Provence: suer, could be gently simmer


Explanation:
and cisellé cold be finely chopped...
ideas admit never bothered to look it up in E... wll have a look and rturn to you if any treasure trove!!!

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Note added at 2004-11-30 15:13:29 (GMT)
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do put in entries one at a time s=as my colleagues suggested..

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Note added at 2004-11-30 15:14:39 (GMT)
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read could be finely chopped

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Note added at 2004-11-30 15:26:20 (GMT)
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or simmer until golden... I admit sweat is maybe the right word but do not much like it either... what about gently brown?

cjohnstone
France
Local time: 04:44
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  MoiraB: simmering would be in some kind of liquid; sweating means precisely that you don't let it brown!
1 hr

agree  francofille: but olive oil is a liquid, therefore I agree with "simmer" if "sweat" won't be understood by novice chefs ;)
13 hrs

disagree  Tony M: Agree with Moira -- sweat means AVOID browning! And it's not usually as long as simmer...
20 hrs
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