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professeur titulaire

English translation: professor

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:professeur titulaire
English translation:professor
Entered by: laenai
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02:59 Sep 12, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Education / Pedagogy / Professor's Title
French term or phrase: professeur titulaire
The title of a professor who wrote a journal article about the new history teaching program in Quebec secondary schools.

I'm don't feel all that comfortable with "fully qualified teacher" as they are talking about a "history department," as if he is a professor at a college. No institution is mentioned under his name.

This is the only context I have:

"**Professeur titulaire** au departement d'histoire, responsable du programme en études québeçoises

Would he be the same as Department Chair in American colleges?

Merci!

femme
Barbara Cochran, MFA
United States
Local time: 15:39
professor
Explanation:
Take a look at a few different Canadian university sites and you will see that under the list of staff the people who in FR are 'professeur titulaire' become 'professor' in EN.

Some examples:
FR: http://www.sceco.umontreal.ca/liste_personnel/index.htm
EN: http://www.sceco.umontreal.ca/liste_personnel/index_e.htm

and

FR: http://www.hec.ca/profs/henri.barki.html
EN: http://www.hec.ca/en/profs/henri.barki.html

and

FR: http://www.etudesup.uottawa.ca/Default.aspx?tabid=1726&monCo...
EN: http://www.etudesup.uottawa.ca/Default.aspx?tabid=1727&monCo...

French sites translate it as 'full professor' but as your text is Canadian I would stick with the translation used on the CA university sites.

example of 'full professor': http://groupugo.div.jussieu.fr/Groupugo/Participants/GRUTMAN...
Selected response from:

laenai
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:39
Grading comment
Merci!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4professor
laenai
4 +3tenured professor
Alison Jeffries-Thierry
4 +1full professor (US)/ personal chair (UK)
Melissa McMahon
5Senior lecturer ( US)
telefpro


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
professor


Explanation:
Take a look at a few different Canadian university sites and you will see that under the list of staff the people who in FR are 'professeur titulaire' become 'professor' in EN.

Some examples:
FR: http://www.sceco.umontreal.ca/liste_personnel/index.htm
EN: http://www.sceco.umontreal.ca/liste_personnel/index_e.htm

and

FR: http://www.hec.ca/profs/henri.barki.html
EN: http://www.hec.ca/en/profs/henri.barki.html

and

FR: http://www.etudesup.uottawa.ca/Default.aspx?tabid=1726&monCo...
EN: http://www.etudesup.uottawa.ca/Default.aspx?tabid=1727&monCo...

French sites translate it as 'full professor' but as your text is Canadian I would stick with the translation used on the CA university sites.

example of 'full professor': http://groupugo.div.jussieu.fr/Groupugo/Participants/GRUTMAN...

laenai
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:39
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Merci!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mohamed Mehenoun
41 mins

agree  veratek
2 hrs

agree  translatol: Agree, although the usage isn't uniform even within Canada. For example, at the University of Ottawa (perhaps under French influence, since it's bilingual), the title is Full Professor. Anyway, 'tenured professor' in Canada is 'professeur permanent'.
3 hrs

agree  katsy
3 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
full professor (US)/ personal chair (UK)


Explanation:
Definitely not a Department Chair as this is usually an administrative position rather than an academic one (even if held by an academic).

I also don't think tenured professor is strong enough in a North American context as one can be a tenured professor without being a full professor, and "professeur titulaire" refers to the highest possible academic level.

See: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titularisation

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2007-09-12 07:49:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If "Professor" is understood as "full professor" in Canada (as it is in Australia), I agree that Professor by itself will be fine. The main issue is that in the US, even the most junior and non-tenured academics are entitled to call themselves "professors", so that's just something to keep in mind.

Melissa McMahon
Australia
Local time: 05:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 56

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  veratek
2 hrs

neutral  translatol: Agree up to a point. In Canada too, all grades of professor are called 'professor' informally - it's a blanket term, and the distinctions are only made for official purposes as in CVs, staff lists, collective agreements and the like.
3 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Senior lecturer ( US)


Explanation:
This is the equivalent for US

telefpro
Local time: 01:09
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
tenured professor


Explanation:
Robert-Collins: titualaire - {professeur] with tenure ...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2007-09-12 11:35:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or professor (with tenure)

Alison Jeffries-Thierry
Local time: 05:39
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxhelene_d
1 hr
  -> thanks helene

agree  Kari Foster: Yes, and it does not necessarily mean "full professor", as an "associate professor" can also have tenure.
5 hrs
  -> thanks Kari

agree  Anne Girardeau
5 hrs
  -> thanks Anne

neutral  translatol: Not Canadian usage. In Canada, 'tenured professor' is 'professeur permanent'.
6 hrs
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Changes made by editors
Sep 23, 2007 - Changes made by laenai:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/123909">Barbara Cochran, MFA's</a> old entry - "professeur titulaire" » "professor"
Sep 23, 2007 - Changes made by Barbara Cochran, MFA:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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