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Graduat en Droit / Licence en Droit

English translation: First-Year Undergraduate Law Studies / First-Year Master's In Law Studies

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23:37 Nov 15, 2013
French to English translations [PRO]
Education / Pedagogy / School transcripts
French term or phrase: Graduat en Droit / Licence en Droit
I am going to be posting a few questions from a series of university transcripts I received from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The transcripts and certificates are for a law student. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

I know that degrees are not to be translated, but I also like to put (and most clients expect) some kind of brief explication in parenthesis.

The student has certificates for:
Premier Graduat en Droit (1998) [First-Year Undergraduate Law Studies ??]
Deuxieme Graduat en Droit (1999) [Second-Year Undergraduate Law Studies ??]
Troisieme Graduat en Droit (2000)
Premiere Licence en Droit (2001) [First-Year Master's in Law Studies ??] / [First-Year Graduate Level Law Studies ??]
Deuixieme Licence en Droit (2002)

I know there is no absolute translation, but am I way off the mark here?
LegalTransform
United States
Local time: 13:16
English translation:First-Year Undergraduate Law Studies / First-Year Master's In Law Studies
Explanation:
Your are right to steer clear of calling them "translations", but your English explainations are right. The terms they use, "Graduat" and "Licence" refer to first cycle and second cycle university studies, respectively. Someone who has a "Licence" in law may work as a lawyer, and therefore, we can say it's the equivalent of a "Master's".
Selected response from:

David Lalonde-Lavoie
Canada
Local time: 13:16
Grading comment
Thanks David and Nikki for your help.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +1"Graduat" in Law/"Licence" in Law
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
4First-Year Undergraduate Law Studies / First-Year Master's In Law Studies
David Lalonde-Lavoie


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Premier Graduat en Droit / Première Licence en Droit
First-Year Undergraduate Law Studies / First-Year Master's In Law Studies


Explanation:
Your are right to steer clear of calling them "translations", but your English explainations are right. The terms they use, "Graduat" and "Licence" refer to first cycle and second cycle university studies, respectively. Someone who has a "Licence" in law may work as a lawyer, and therefore, we can say it's the equivalent of a "Master's".


    Reference: http://www.barreaudelubumbashi.org/profession.htm
    Reference: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%89ducation_en_R%C3%A9publiq...
David Lalonde-Lavoie
Canada
Local time: 13:16
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks David and Nikki for your help.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Nikki Scott-Despaigne: Original is country specific and so I cannot agree with your explanations. In the UK it is not possible to practice as a lawyer with a bachelor's or master's degree. You need further study and practical experience (generally takes a total of 6 years).
7 hrs
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13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
"Graduat" in Law/"Licence" in Law


Explanation:
The original is country specific. The liberal professions are regulated and it is impossible, indeed risky, to consider "translating" them. By that, I mean that a small error in translation could confer upon an individual a level of qualification which may be under or over that which he actually has. Assessing the equivalent value of a diploma is a job undertaken by specific academic commissions. Translators have to be careful and so the best route is generally not to translate.

By way of an illustration, then in the UK, for example, although I believe your target is US, a "licence" is often considered an equivalent of a "bachelor's degree". That is obtained after 3 years of full-time study. Here we apparently have four years of study leading to a level described as a "licence". If I go by the term "licence" alone, then I'd tend to think "bachelor's degree. I may be doing someone out of a higher level. From a professional point of view, it would be a serious mistake. Translators are not qualified to assess equivalent values of qualifications from one country to another. You have to keep your translation as country-specific as possible. It makes for an uncomfortable read, but there is not much of a choice. You could go for a hybrid which nevertheless avoids overstepping the mark, something along the lines of :

Premier Graduat en Droit (1998)= First "graduat" in Law
Deuxieme Graduat en Droit (1999)= Second ...
Troisieme Graduat en Droit (2000)= Third ...
Premiere Licence en Droit (2001)= First "licence" in Law
Deuixieme Licence en Droit (2002)= Second "Licence" in Law



Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 19:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 130

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yolanda Broad
2 days14 hrs
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