dû ou à devoir

English translation: due now or in the future

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13:56 Apr 9, 2018
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Finance (general)
French term or phrase: dû ou à devoir
Financial setup contract

"« Créances Compte Courant d’Associé » désigne toutes sommes dues ou à devoir de quelque nature que ce soit par l’Emprunteur aux Créanciers Subordonnés au titre d’un quelconque Compte Courant d’Associé, en principal, intérêts, intérêts de retard, commissions, frais, accessoires et indemnités ou autrement."

There's got to be a good financial English phrase for this.

As for the meaning, I'm not entirely clear whether it means "due or outstanding (but not yet fallen due)", or "due or which shall in future be due (but aren't at the current time)".
Mpoma
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:47
English translation:due now or in the future
Explanation:
Or current or future sums due.

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Note added at 41 mins (2018-04-09 14:38:11 GMT)
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In answer to the second part of your question, both of your alternatives mean the same thing as far as I can see. You either owe money now (which might include overdue amounts), or in the future.
Selected response from:

philgoddard
United States
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +6due now or in the future
philgoddard
4 -1due or to be due
Francois Boye


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
due now or in the future


Explanation:
Or current or future sums due.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 41 mins (2018-04-09 14:38:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In answer to the second part of your question, both of your alternatives mean the same thing as far as I can see. You either owe money now (which might include overdue amounts), or in the future.

philgoddard
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 187
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks... yes, I know what you mean about my two "interpretations" being the same... but this phrase could potentially (although almost certainly doesn't) cover claims which have not yet even been made... so not "due" or even "outstanding"... but which someone might be imagining being made at some unspecified future time.

Asker: ... and in fact your phrase "future sums due" lends itself to the same ambiguity in EN, which is a plus, as far as I'm concerned.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Chakib Roula: I would like "current or future sums due"
5 mins
  -> So you agree with me!

agree  mchd
1 hr

agree  Tony M: I know what Chakib is getting at, it is tempting to want to say 'currently due', but it is then difficult to render the future possibility without its getting terribly clumsy: "...currently due or liable to become so in the future" etc. :-(
1 hr
  -> Thanks for agreeing. Chakib said "current or future sums due", which was my second suggestion.

agree  katsy
3 hrs

agree  Manoj Chauhan
3 hrs

agree  Daryo: although your explanation is wrong - it's about money owed by the company to the shareholder// the term "toutes sommes dues ou à devoir" is to be understood from the viewpoint of the company
5 hrs
  -> My explanation isn't wrong. I didn't say anything about who owes whom.

agree  AllegroTrans
6 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
due or to be due


Explanation:
My take

Francois Boye
United States
Local time: 12:47
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 177

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: The use of 'to be due' here probably introduces an unwanted connotation, because of the way we use the construction 'to be + infinitive' in EN with a greater notion of 'obligation' than is often the case in FR.
13 mins
  -> 'à devoir' is strong in French, too!

disagree  Daryo: you make it sounds as something that must happen, while in actual fact it only may happen - there might be (-- OR NOT --) some new amounts due in future // talking about yourself is not a reply ...
5 hrs
  -> BLA BLA BLA!

neutral  AllegroTrans: "to be due" is not a phrase with a clear meaning and I would not expect to see it in a formal document // it doesn't say "in two months"...
6 hrs
  -> 'to be due in two months' is absolutely clear!
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