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enrobé dans un dome fondant

English translation: in a melt-in-the-mouth coconut dome

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:enrobé dans un dome fondant
English translation:in a melt-in-the-mouth coconut dome
Entered by: Mark Nathan
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05:48 Oct 31, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Food & Drink / menu
French term or phrase: enrobé dans un dome fondant
Cœur de mangue enrobé dans un dome fondant à la noix de coco

from a menu
Mark Nathan
France
Local time: 01:23
in a melt-in-the-mouth coconut dome
Explanation:
Just a different approach - if I saw this on a menu in France I woujld expect a sort of melting, light exterior. It could well be a mousse, but if the chef is unable to confirm then 'melt-in-the-mouth' could be a way around it. The idea always being to get the taste buds going!
Selected response from:

Katherine Mérignac
France
Local time: 01:23
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone - would have liked to split the points with Tony
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +2in a melt-in-the-mouth coconut dome
Katherine Mérignac
3wrapped in a fondant/truffle dome
Carol Gullidge
1 +2wrapped in (a dome of) coconut mousse
Tony M
3shaped with a coconut mousse fudge dome
Francis MARC


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
shaped with a coconut mousse fudge dome


Explanation:
Chocolate Desserts- [ Traduire cette page ]This large dome-shaped fudge cake shell is filled with creamy chocolate mousse and capped with a dark Belgian chocolate frosting. La Bamba ...
www.beauchocolat.com/frames/chocolat.htm - 5k -


Francis MARC
Lithuania
Local time: 02:23
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 34
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +2
enrobé dans un dome fondant à la noix de coco
wrapped in (a dome of) coconut mousse


Explanation:
It's hard to know what best to do with 'fondant' here — usualyl, I'd expect it to be a soft, moussy type of thing (cf fondant au chocolat) BUT it very definitely has flour in it, which rather stops it being officialy 'mousse'

If you called it a 'sponge', it would probably better reflect the texture (although it's more gooey than fluffy), but people might expect something more cakey, which it may not be.

As ever, the ideal solution would be to ask the chef!

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Note added at 2 hrs (2007-10-31 08:30:44 GMT)
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Well, the outside of a 'fondant' might well be slightly 'crusty', but I wouldn't see that as being an accurate description of the body of a fondant. The trouble is knowing if this is a fondant in the classic sense (in which case I'd have thought it might have had slight trouble holding any sort of dome shape!), or some special concoction.

Tony M
France
Local time: 01:23
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 159
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Tony, I had been thinking of some sort of crust, but mousse might be better. I'll have to query it.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jean-jacques alexandre: Hi Tony, Yes Tony
18 mins
  -> Merci, J-J !

agree  ormiston: 'encased' might be better, as wrapping in mousse sounds messy!
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Ormiston! I'm not sure, to me 'encased' sounds more like engineering, and also, suggest something hard / brittle; encased in dark chocloate, perhaps, but wrapped in a soft eiderdown of mousse...
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
wrapped in a fondant/truffle dome


Explanation:
hard to know without an illustration...

But, fondant is often seen these days referring to those desserts consisting of a cake that is not cooked right through, and therefore has a delicious gooey, runny, truffley centre.

The trouble with "fondant" is that it's also commonly understood to be a popular form of cake icing - although I think the menu context would make it obvious that this isn't what is being used here.

You often see "fondant" on menus, and, indeed, this cropped up in a cookbook I translated earlier this year. It definitely didn't refer to cake icing!

Carol Gullidge
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:23
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Only trouble is, 'truffle' in a dessert context suggests chocolate, and there is noe suggestion in the context given that it contains any; 'fondant' is risky, as it will inevitably conjure up the images of a sugary confection, not right here either
5 mins
  -> thanks, Tony. I think this is more or less what I was saying. Nevertheless, you do see "fondant" these days on menus, where it clearly doesn't denote that rather horrid (?) icing. Agree about "truffle" connotations, which is why I left the alternative.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
in a melt-in-the-mouth coconut dome


Explanation:
Just a different approach - if I saw this on a menu in France I woujld expect a sort of melting, light exterior. It could well be a mousse, but if the chef is unable to confirm then 'melt-in-the-mouth' could be a way around it. The idea always being to get the taste buds going!

Katherine Mérignac
France
Local time: 01:23
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone - would have liked to split the points with Tony

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Paul Cohen: I'd say "mouth-watering"
2 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Tony M: Yes, I think melt-in-the-mouth is an excellent way of rendering the idea of 'fondant' without being too specific / ;-)
11 hrs
  -> Thanks Tony - I think we go to the same restaurants :)
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