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Chambre froide BAEF (+)

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00:19 Nov 30, 2008
This question was closed without grading. Reason: No acceptable answer

French to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Food & Drink / Resaurant kitchen equipment
French term or phrase: Chambre froide BAEF (+)
This is one of the cold rooms in a restaurant kitchen. This is part of a construction specification, so has to be precise. I can't find anything that makes sense for "BAEF".
B D Finch
France
Local time: 13:19
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Summary of answers provided
2cold roomJessica Agullo
1 +1BAEF
Tony M
Summary of reference entries provided
blown air refrigeration
Rachel Fell

Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
BAEF
BAEF


Explanation:
I strongly suspect that this is just the make / brand of the refrigerator — however, it seems odd that this doesn't appear on the 'Net as far as I have been able to find. I'm wondering if there is possibly a typo (might it originally have been something like 'AEG' for example?)

I'm sure this idea will already have occurred to you, of course — but maybe it's some comfort to know that someoen else has the same hunch as you! Are there any other clues in your wider context? For example, are other makes / brands mentioned, or do you know if this is an existing item to be re-installed in new premises, or new supply? I've had this situation before, where after much brain-racking, it turned out that a 'machin-truc-bidule XYZ' just meant 'the old thingumajig previosuly installed in the XYZ'!

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Note added at 8 hrs (2008-11-30 08:58:42 GMT)
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Just as a very long shot, I wonder if this could be a non-standard EN acronym, since a lot of industrial fridges use 'Blown Air' (froid ventilé)... again, haven't found anything on the 'Net, but maybe this could be a path to explore...

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Note added at 8 hrs (2008-11-30 09:00:48 GMT)
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BTW, (Granny - egg, egg - Granny), I suppose you already know that 'chambre froid' MAY be a 'cold room', but can also be just a fridge (cold cupboard type of thing) — not necessarily walk-in at all. All depends just how big this kitchen is...

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Note added at 8 hrs (2008-11-30 09:18:49 GMT)
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Yes, certainly looks like it! Anything else is doomed to be mere speculation.

The mere fact that it is expressed in m² is clear-cut, since AFAIK the smaller ones are expressed in litres.

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Note added at 9 hrs (2008-11-30 09:27:47 GMT)
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Crossed my mind too... wouldn't be the first time I've come across a horribly mixed-language acronym.

Tony M
France
Local time: 13:19
Meets criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 159
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Tony. M² ranges between nine and 15, so they're definitely cold rooms. I think this is going to be one where I have to ask the client.

Asker: Hummm: Blown Air Extra Froid (if it's Franglais).


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxBourth: Blown air eau forcée (forced water), even ;-) / It googles.
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Alex! (forced water'? Do they use that as a refrigerant, then?
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1 day41 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
cold room


Explanation:
BAEF is hard to find. A large refrigeration unit - room size - is usually called simply and exactly as in the french - a cold room.

Jessica Agullo
United States
Local time: 07:19
Does not meet criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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Reference comments


13 hrs
Reference: blown air refrigeration

Reference information:
You see it in chiller cabinets in supermarket delicatessen counters -

Jinny display serve over is an ideal cabinet for an even better display. The ventilated versions include blown air refrigeration system and lower temperature, making them suitable for French meat or dairy products and delicatessen products.
http://www.pizzaequip.co.uk/products/restaurant_equipments/s...

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Note added at 21 hrs (2008-11-30 21:49:36 GMT)
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Actually, I'm not sure, and realised my ref. was slightly misguided, as I'd been meaning to respond to Tony's question! I know forced water may be used as a coolant, but not sure whether in these circs. or not. I couldn't find anything useful about your term when I looked, sorry. May be a French acronym, but might be best to ask the client.

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Meets criteria
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32
Note to reference poster
Asker: As the initials of this are BAR, I take it that you also think it is a Franglais acronym?

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