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succulents au chocolat

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11:43 Feb 24, 2012
French to English translations [PRO]
Food & Drink / Cakes and desserts
French term or phrase: succulents au chocolat
This is part of a list of desserts and pastries from the south of France:

succulents au chocolat avec vin de Rivesaltes

It's not for a menu, but mentioned in passing in a handbook of regional specialities. I'm therefore looking for a description of what a "succulent" is, not a creative solution for translating the name.

Alas, this site only mentions them but doesn't provide any photo:
http://www.cuisinealafrancaise.com/fr/regions/13-languedoc-r...

I've combed through all of my most obscure cookery books, but even these haven't come up trumps this time. Does anyone know what a "succulent" is? TIA.
Sarah Bessioud
Germany
Local time: 21:08
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Summary of answers provided
3 +1Here's a pictureColin Rowe
3 +1Moist chocolate cupcake
Isabelle Barth-O'Neill


Discussion entries: 11





  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Moist chocolate cupcake


Explanation:

Here is a picture

http://restaurants-bars.vivastreet.fr/restaurants marseille-...

For me when you mentionned it - it straight away evokes a smaill cake - nothing big, which would be cut

it could also have the texture of brownies which melt in the mout

It is just a suggestion

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Note added at 20 mins (2012-02-24 12:04:02 GMT)
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I saw they have brownies on the site of your client - so that is out !!

Isabelle Barth-O'Neill
Local time: 20:08
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Letredenoblesse
37 mins

neutral  B D Finch: Cupcakes evoke those sickly Cadbury's (I think) sponges topped with about half an inch of soft icing.
1 hr
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Here's a picture


Explanation:
http://www.recettes-de-leyre-et-d-ailleurs.fr/2011/05/07/moe...

Looks like a moist chocolate cake (almost sponge-type).

"Vin de Rivesaltes" presumably refers to "Muscat de Rivesaltes",
a delicious sweet white wine. (Comes in fancy bottles!)

I'd better post and get out of here before my mouth waters too much... Bon appétit! :-)

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Note added at 29 mins (2012-02-24 12:13:17 GMT)
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However...

This site (http://ainsifontfontfont.blogspot.com/2008/10/succulent-au-c... and several others seem to suggest that a "Succulent au chocolat" is something more like a mousse, but cooked in the oven...

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Note added at 34 mins (2012-02-24 12:18:15 GMT)
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Not sure what this site is all about (http://www.rpg-legends.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=434&st=... but it does have a photo labelled "Un succulent au chocolat", for what it's worth.

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Note added at 2 hrs (2012-02-24 14:34:31 GMT)
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Given that "gateau" is used in English to refer to a moist dessert, often containing alcohol, two possible ideas that spring to mind are "tipsy chocolate gateau" or "chocolate and muscat gateau".

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Note added at 6 hrs (2012-02-24 18:31:53 GMT)
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At home now, with access to my cookery books, I have just had another look at the recipe for "Succulent au chocolat" on: http://ainsifontfontfont.blogspot.com/2008/10/succulent-au-c...
This recipe – the one that I said sounded like a mousse cooked in the oven – corresponds very closely to what my "The Best Ever French Cooking Course" calls a "Gâteau Mousse au Chocolat", or rather unimaginitively in English "Chocolate Mousse Cake".
Whether or not this is related to your "Succulent au chocolat", who knows? It would certainly taste nice soaked in Muscat, though. Or washed down with a glass or three...

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Note added at 6 hrs (2012-02-24 18:33:35 GMT)
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Whatever it actually is, you probably can't go far wrong with something like "moist chocolate and Muscat gâteau".

Colin Rowe
Germany
Local time: 21:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rachel Fell: 'moist chocolate and Muscat (wine) cakes'
4 hrs
  -> Sounds yummy! All we need now is a supplier... Perhaps JdM will make some for us :-)
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