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semaines paires / impaires

English translation: alternate weeks, even week numbers at X, odd week numbers at Y

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:semaines paires / impaires
English translation:alternate weeks, even week numbers at X, odd week numbers at Y
Entered by: French2English
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11:43 Feb 20, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / General language
French term or phrase: semaines paires / impaires
Nos bureaux sont ouverts en alternance:

semaines paires a X
semaines impaires a Y

Does this simply mean:

Our offices are open every other week, as follows:

Every 2nd and 4th week in X
Every 1st and 3rd week in Y

Can't imagine what else it could mean! Just looking for confirmation, as surprisingly I have never come across 'pair' and 'impair' used to refer to weeks before!

Thanks.
French2English
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:14
alternate weeks, even week numbers at X, odd week numbers at Y
Explanation:
The French use week numbers more often than the British (ie we are currently in week 8 of 2007. An even week number, but the third (full) week in February. I initially though you didn't need to translate even and odd, but I think you might have too.
Selected response from:

Emma Paulay
France
Local time: 09:14
Grading comment
Graded on account of the overwhelming agreement - a very helpful explanation of a term which is no doubt common in France but not necessarily obvious to the English-speaking world. Thanks to all contributors.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +12alternate weeks, even week numbers at X, odd week numbers at Y
Emma Paulay
3 +3alternate weeksAlain Pommet
5even/odd weeks
gabuss
4every 2nd 4thtranslator_15
4 -1even / uneven weeksMarwa Blues


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
even/odd weeks


Explanation:
Je propose

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Note added at 5 mins (2007-02-20 11:49:29 GMT)
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the even weeks are 2nd and 4th weeks
the odd weeks are 1st and 3rd weeks

gabuss
Local time: 07:14
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: I honestly don't think it is meant to mean that; I've seen THAT idea expressed differently in FR / No need, other answerers have got it right!
22 mins
  -> Tony, I will be grateful to have the alternative you're proposing

neutral  Robin Levey: The translation is (almost) OK, but the reasonning is wrong. In English we usually write 'odd/even', whereas the French is usually 'pair(e)/impair(e)' (the reverse).
37 mins
  -> Thanks for the lesson concerning the positioning in English
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +12
alternate weeks, even week numbers at X, odd week numbers at Y


Explanation:
The French use week numbers more often than the British (ie we are currently in week 8 of 2007. An even week number, but the third (full) week in February. I initially though you didn't need to translate even and odd, but I think you might have too.

Emma Paulay
France
Local time: 09:14
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 126
Grading comment
Graded on account of the overwhelming agreement - a very helpful explanation of a term which is no doubt common in France but not necessarily obvious to the English-speaking world. Thanks to all contributors.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, I think you're right, it is referring to CALENDAR week numbers, NOT weeks in the month
15 mins
  -> Thanks Tony

agree  writeaway: most EU business agendas list in terms of week 1, week 2 etc of the year. not just France.
16 mins
  -> Yes, thanks writeaway

agree  Attila Piróth
21 mins
  -> Thanks Attila

agree  translator_15: Yes I agree it is definitely referring to calendar weeks. This answer is better as mine is based on the monthly calendar which would make the staff at the impair office work harder in 5 week months!!
28 mins
  -> Thanks Emma

agree  Robin Levey: Exactly.
29 mins
  -> Thanks mediamatrix

agree  Assimina Vavoula
53 mins
  -> Thanks Assimina

agree  David Goward
59 mins
  -> Thanks David

agree  Sheila Wilson: could shorten it to "even weeks at X, odd weeks at Y"
1 hr
  -> You could, but I don't think it sounds right somehow and may not be clear enough.

agree  Carol Gullidge: definitely! ... in X, ...in Y (?)
1 hr
  -> Thanks Carol. Possibly "in" but I took X and Y to be the opening times not the place, for some reason!

agree  Charles Hawtrey: Alas, a long explanation seems to be the only way in EN. But it's a fairly unusual way of opening a shop in GB (maybe a bank???)
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Charles

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Vicky

agree  jean-jacques alexandre: I jump in the band wagon & give it 2 thumbs
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Jean-Jacques
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
alternate weeks


Explanation:


Not sure about the 'true' translation. French firms I go into usually/often describe each week by the number ascribed to it on the calendar - so they are obviously odd and even in this sense. ( I don't know who is responsible for deciding when week one begins on the calendar.)


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Note added at 13 mins (2007-02-20 11:57:35 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thinking about it, I suppose week one starts on the first Monday of the year, so nobody decides. I think I'm right in saying that French weeks begin on Monday whereas English weeks begin on a Sunday.

Alain Pommet
Local time: 09:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: No, Alain, English weeks begin on Monday too! Remember, Sunday is the 7th day, the 'Day of Rest' / Sorry, Collins is WRONG! In the UK, the week has ALWAYS begun on Monday, unless recent EU changes have been made for the sake of "political correcteness"
16 mins
  -> Disagree! just checked my Collins. Sunday NOUN the first day of the week. I think you're quoting the Bible. I was wrong 'cos in France it is ALSO the first day. Littré: 'Le premier jour de la semaine'. (Nobody told ISO)

agree  writeaway: excellent explanation
20 mins
  -> Thanks writeaway

agree  Attila Piróth
23 mins
  -> Thanks Attila

neutral  Robin Levey: This does not answer the question: pair/impaire
30 mins

agree  Assimina Vavoula
55 mins
  -> Thanks Assimina

disagree  Sheila Wilson: As Mediamatrix says. So which week is Office X open? - this doesn't tell us - it just tells us to come back next week if it's shut
1 hr
  -> Weeks beginning with an even number, but I suppose French2English knew that in the first place.
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
even / uneven weeks


Explanation:
just another proposal...

Marwa Blues
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:14
Native speaker of: French

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: could lead to confusion. normally in terms of numbers it's even and odd.
14 mins

disagree  David Goward: Definitely not "uneven" - sorry!
47 mins
  -> I saw this in some letters I received...
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
every 2nd 4th


Explanation:
Yes, you have understood it correctly. That is exactly what it means :-)

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Note added at 41 mins (2007-02-20 12:25:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Just for reference as you mentioned you have not seen semaines paires et impaires in use before, it is often used for rubbish collection timetables. See this link:
http://www.stmalo-agglomeration.fr/fr/rubrique-principale/me...

translator_15
France
Local time: 09:14
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: I honestly don't think it is meant to mean that; I've seen THAT idea expressed differently in FR
22 mins
  -> Yes Tony, I agree with you, my answer doesn't reflect the fact it is based on calendar weeks.
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