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Il ruspète parce qu'il n'arrive pas à le rejoindre

English translation: He's moaning because he can't get in touch with him

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05:49 Mar 5, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
French term or phrase: Il ruspète parce qu'il n'arrive pas à le rejoindre
Context is casual conversation. I have seen 'ruspète' before, but can find it in no hard copy or on line dictionary, in that form or in the infinitive form. Google produces passages from chat rooms, but the contexts are not such as to give a clear indication of the meaning. Help!
John Trotter
Local time: 13:20
English translation:He's moaning because he can't get in touch with him
Explanation:
"rouspeter" is the verb you're looking for.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 24 mins (2007-03-05 06:14:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"moaning" can be replaced by "grumbling".
"get in touch with" can be replaced by "get hold of"

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Note added at 3 days34 mins (2007-03-08 06:23:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Why? Is he a Pom?? ;-)
"Whinging" is frequently used in UK English too nowadays, but perhaps more in the sense of "pleurnicher" in relation to people who think they've been hard done to... the Arsenal football (soccer) team manager Arsène Wenger is indeed known as "Arsène Whinger".
Selected response from:

David Goward
France
Local time: 05:20
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +6He's moaning because he can't get in touch with him
David Goward
4 +1He's fuming/grumbling because he can't reach him/manage to reach him
rousselures


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Il rouspète parce qu'il n'arrive pas à le rejoindre
He's fuming/grumbling because he can't reach him/manage to reach him


Explanation:
David's right, it's a typo for "rouspète". I used "to reach him" because without more context, it can work if he's trying to reach him by phone or if they're they both jogging and he's trying to catch up, or if he's trying to catch up with him in any other way...

rousselures
Canada
Local time: 23:20
Does not meet criteria
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker:

Asker: Many thanks. The context is in fact telephone, but the writer is not a native speaker.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  David Goward: Although it's possible, I'd have expected "rattraper" to be used in that case.
1 hr
  -> Both can be used...:-)

agree  Emma Paulay: John probably doesn't need help with "rejoindre" as he has the context. However, to me, it does seem more probable that it is a case of reaching in some other way than by telephone, when "joindre" is used, but not "rejoindre".
2 hrs
  -> Thank you!
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
He's moaning because he can't get in touch with him


Explanation:
"rouspeter" is the verb you're looking for.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 24 mins (2007-03-05 06:14:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"moaning" can be replaced by "grumbling".
"get in touch with" can be replaced by "get hold of"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 days34 mins (2007-03-08 06:23:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Why? Is he a Pom?? ;-)
"Whinging" is frequently used in UK English too nowadays, but perhaps more in the sense of "pleurnicher" in relation to people who think they've been hard done to... the Arsenal football (soccer) team manager Arsène Wenger is indeed known as "Arsène Whinger".

David Goward
France
Local time: 05:20
Does not meet criteria
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 43
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Many thanks, David. I should have thought of the possibility of a typo. With this lead, I have used for my Australian audience the fine Australian term 'whinging', which has the same tone as 'rouspeter'.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Natasha Dupuy
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Natasha

agree  FrenchJane: Right on all counts! Go with it!
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Jane!

agree  Emma Paulay: with moaning
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Emma.

agree  jacqueb: Personally, I like "grumbling" better, but both work well.
6 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Kathryn Strachecky: I'd go with "grumbling". Rouspèter always conjures up the image an old man for me and I feel that grumble gets that across better than "moan". But that's a very personal opinion.
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Kathryn.

agree  tatyana000
11 hrs
  -> Thanks, Tatyana
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Voters for reclassification
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PRO / non-PRO
Non-PRO (1): David Goward


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