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Jeu des valses-hesitations

English translation: all the to-ing and fro-ing

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Jeu des valses-hesitations
English translation:all the to-ing and fro-ing
Entered by: Catherine Gorton
Options:
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22:41 Jun 26, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / GALILEO (European satnav system) concession
French term or phrase: Jeu des valses-hesitations
"Certains disent que le jeu des valses-hesitations entre industriels et gouvernements aura fini par gonfler le prix de revient du projet de 1,5 a 3,4 milliards d'Euros... que le contribuable paiera." (Basically, the industrialists who were candidates to the concession and were supposed to finance part of it have dragged their feet for so long that the EU will now have to finance most of the expenses itself. Can't find anything better than "this succession of hesitations" but don't like it...
Catherine Gorton
Local time: 10:40
all the to-ing and fro-ing
Explanation:
Might sound a tad too colloquial for your register, but it does get used in even quite formal registers.

If not, how about 'vacillation'?
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 11:40
Grading comment
I think your "to-ing and fro-ing" works best in my text although I found it really hard to dismiss dithering. As for my foot-dragging, it was only from the side of the industrials and not from both sides as in the text. Therefore I'll go for to-ing and fro-ing as it relates more to the back and forth of the context and reminds also of the back and forth movements of a waltz. THANK YOU Tony and everyone for all the ideas. I hope they can help someone else another time! Sorry I can't give points to more than 1 person. Cath
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5after so much pussyfooting aboutxxxBourth
3 +2all the to-ing and fro-ing
Tony M
4dawdlingMatthewLaSon
4waffling
Béatrice Huret-Morton
3 -1interrupted courtship danceJim Tucker


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
jeu des valses-hesitations
all the to-ing and fro-ing


Explanation:
Might sound a tad too colloquial for your register, but it does get used in even quite formal registers.

If not, how about 'vacillation'?

Tony M
France
Local time: 11:40
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 316
Grading comment
I think your "to-ing and fro-ing" works best in my text although I found it really hard to dismiss dithering. As for my foot-dragging, it was only from the side of the industrials and not from both sides as in the text. Therefore I'll go for to-ing and fro-ing as it relates more to the back and forth of the context and reminds also of the back and forth movements of a waltz. THANK YOU Tony and everyone for all the ideas. I hope they can help someone else another time! Sorry I can't give points to more than 1 person. Cath

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Melissa McMahon
59 mins
  -> Thanks, Melissa!

agree  writeaway: unlimited possibilities -dictionaries provide the start..
1 hr
  -> Thanks, W/A! Indeed, yes, plenty of material there to be starting off with.

neutral  MatthewLaSon: It sounds like something out of a poem. I don't think it's contextually appropriate.
23 hrs
  -> Oh no, Matt, in UK EN at least it's not a bit 'poetic', and is very common, even in surprisingly formal registers. Perhaps you've just never heard it in AE?
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
after so much pussyfooting about


Explanation:
Not necessarily something the non-native speaker will catch onto like a trap to a mouse.

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Note added at 15 mins (2007-06-26 22:56:38 GMT)
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dithering

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Note added at 20 mins (2007-06-26 23:02:00 GMT)
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shilly-shally, dilly-dally, hum and haw, hedge, fudge

Depending on whether they have deliberately dragged their feet or were simply incapable of coming to an agreement, making their minds up, etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 mins (2007-06-26 23:02:50 GMT)
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stalling, if they were deliberately foot-dragging.

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Note added at 25 mins (2007-06-26 23:06:39 GMT)
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On a more familiar level, of course, farting about, stuffing around.

xxxBourth
Local time: 11:40
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 204

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  chaplin: dithering
40 mins

agree  writeaway: ditto RC et al
1 hr

agree  Assimina Vavoula: dithering
7 hrs

agree  Jacqui Audouy: I like "shilly shallying" best here
14 hrs

agree  Tony M: some of those suggestions wuldn't work for the UK, but I like your headword suggestion and some of the others too
21 hrs
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
waffling


Explanation:
Cheers,

Béa

Béatrice Huret-Morton
Local time: 11:40
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: A good word, but not the right meaning, here, really; it's more like 'langue de bois'
13 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
interrupted courtship dance


Explanation:
we are dancing, aren't we?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2007-06-27 00:46:23 GMT)
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you could leave the "dance" out if we're not

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Note added at 22 hrs (2007-06-27 21:26:04 GMT)
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"interrupted courtship" is a perfectly standard phrase and gets hundreds of ghits

Jim Tucker
United States
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  AllegroTrans: poetic yes, but obscure and not in line with the tone of the text
1 hr
  -> Thanks. I really think the waltz is in g-sharp.

neutral  xxxBourth: Maybe I have that sort of mind, but it makes me think 'coitus interruptus'!
7 hrs
  -> you said it, not me! .......google "interrupted courtship" in quotes

neutral  Tony M: 'courtship interruptus'? (me too, Alex!)
19 hrs
  -> indeed! or halting - "interrupted courtship" is a perfectly standard phrase and gets hundreds of ghits - I don't know what's up with you guys - don't make me guess!
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23 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
dawdling


Explanation:
Hello,

This is used quite a bit in the business/financial context.

You could say the following, but I don't prefer them.

dilly-dallying around/about (relatively standard slang)
himhawing around/back and forth (much less standard in international English)

I hope this helps.


    Reference: http://www.detnews.com/2005/editorial/0509/11/A17-310046.htm
MatthewLaSon
Local time: 05:40
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 145

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: 'dawdling' just means 'walking slowly', and loses a lot of the feeling of 'jeu...'; 'shilly-shallying' is more common in BE than your other 2 suggestions, but I still feel the register is erring on the slangy side
6 hrs
  -> Tony, "dawdling" can mean "dilly-dallying around" (see the dictionary). There's nothing "slangy" about the word. I have no idea where you're coming from.
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Changes made by editors
Jun 26, 2007 - Changes made by writeaway:
FieldLaw/Patents » Bus/Financial
Field (specific)Law: Contract(s) » General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters


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