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toute dévoué

English translation: yours sincerely

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:toute dévoué
English translation:yours sincerely
Entered by: Jana Cole
Options:
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16:08 Nov 13, 2008
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / letter closing
French term or phrase: toute dévoué
votre toute dévoué

After seeing responses to to my last question, I understand what this means, but what's the correct wording?

I remain,

Your Devotee
or
Your Humble Devotee

??
Jana Cole
Local time: 07:00
yours faithfully
Explanation:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valediction
In the UK, traditional valedictions have been mainly replaced by "Yours sincerely" or "Yours faithfully".

Yours sincerely is used when the recipient is addressed by name and is known to you to some degree, and Yours faithfully is used when the recipient is not known by name (i.e. the recipient is addressed by a phrase such as "Dear Sir/Madam").

When the recipient's name is known, but not previously met or spoken with, some people prefer the use of the more distant Yours faithfully, but most prefer to use Yours sincerely.

In the US, "Yours sincerely" is properly used in social correspondence. "Yours faithfully" is properly used in business correspondence with someone whose name is unknown to the writer (i.e., in a letter addressed "Dear Sir or Madam" or "To Whom It May Concern").

In the US, the inverted "Sincerely yours" and the simplified "Sincerely" are also common.
Selected response from:

Jean-Louis S.
United States
Local time: 10:00
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +8yours truly
Katarina Peters
3yours faithfullyJean-Louis S.
3Your humble/devoted servantColin Rowe


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
yours truly


Explanation:
US English keeps it simple.

Katarina Peters
Canada
Local time: 10:00
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in HungarianHungarian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Estelle Demontrond-Box
12 mins
  -> Thank you Estelle.

agree  Trudy Peters: Plain and simple
13 mins
  -> Thank you Trudy.

agree  xxxcmwilliams: use the standard closing ('I remain' isn't necessary either)
14 mins
  -> Thank you cm.

agree  1045
25 mins
  -> Thank you 1045.

agree  MatthewLaSon: Yes, this implies loyalty.
2 hrs
  -> Thank uou Matthew.

agree  Ingeborg Gowans
5 hrs
  -> Thank you Ingeborg.

agree  Valosh
8 hrs
  -> Thank you Valosh.

agree  sdavidson
23 hrs
  -> Thank you Shelley.
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Your humble/devoted servant


Explanation:
Somewhat archaic and groveling, but well attested!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2008-11-13 16:20:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

PEP Web - Letter from Sigmund Freud to Eduard Silberstein, July 12 ...
I remain your devoted servant
Sigmund Freud.

Postcard; in Latin. Viennae, 12.7. oder 27.12.1871. Ad Jubilarem. Magnis doloribus me dentes afficiunt atque ...

http://www.pep-web.org/document.php?id=zbk.029.0001b

I’m sure you’ve seen or heard of sign-offs that go further, into the realm of “I remain your humble servant.”

These days they may be used jokingly but the idea behind them runs along the same lines as the greeting “ciao.” The word is from Italian and actually means “servant” or “slave.”

http://podictionary.com/?p=196

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 mins (2008-11-13 16:23:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

However, French does tend to go in for far more flowery sign-offs than English, so something like

"Yours sincerely" (if addressed to a named person)

or

"Yours faithfully" (if addressed to Dear Sir/Madam,)

is probably quite sufficient!

Colin Rowe
Germany
Local time: 16:00
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxcmwilliams: This would look very odd on a business letter. It doesn't need to be translated literally. Just use the standard closing - ..yours sincerely/faithfully or the American equivalent.
9 mins
  -> We appear to have cross-posted. I was adding these very suggestions (yours sincerely/faithfully) when you posted!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
yours faithfully


Explanation:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valediction
In the UK, traditional valedictions have been mainly replaced by "Yours sincerely" or "Yours faithfully".

Yours sincerely is used when the recipient is addressed by name and is known to you to some degree, and Yours faithfully is used when the recipient is not known by name (i.e. the recipient is addressed by a phrase such as "Dear Sir/Madam").

When the recipient's name is known, but not previously met or spoken with, some people prefer the use of the more distant Yours faithfully, but most prefer to use Yours sincerely.

In the US, "Yours sincerely" is properly used in social correspondence. "Yours faithfully" is properly used in business correspondence with someone whose name is unknown to the writer (i.e., in a letter addressed "Dear Sir or Madam" or "To Whom It May Concern").

In the US, the inverted "Sincerely yours" and the simplified "Sincerely" are also common.

Jean-Louis S.
United States
Local time: 10:00
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 27

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Colin Rowe: See my comments above!
16 mins
  -> Thank you. Did not see before posting.
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