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Idumee

English translation: Idumea

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Idumee
English translation:Idumea
Entered by: Carole Harrington
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11:12 Aug 13, 2001
French to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Geography
French term or phrase: Idumee
This is I believe a place name which I encountered while translating a text about
Galilee at the time of Jesus. I would like the name of the place in English, please.
Carole Harrington
Canada
Local time: 14:31
the place is Idumea, the people Idumeans. Supposedly,
Explanation:
they are the sons of Edom.
You can check on the web, it's all over.
Selected response from:

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 20:31
Grading comment
I think I must be a poor browser!
1 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naIn support of CeciliaFuad Yahya
nathe place is Idumea, the people Idumeans. Supposedly,
Parrot
naIdumeusMarcus Malabad
na -1Idumee
Alain BERTRAND


  

Answers


9 mins peer agreement (net): -1
Idumee


Explanation:
Stays the same if it designs a place

Alain BERTRAND
Local time: 23:31
Grading comment
Places have different names in different languages eg Londre

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Parrot: Place names used universally in literature DO tend to translate.
7 hrs
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: Places have different names in different languages eg Londre

13 mins
Idumeus


Explanation:
From the link below:

Herod the Great

Herod was the king of Palestine between 40 and 4 BC. He was established by Antonio and Ottaviano (before the last one became the emperor Augustus). He was not a Jew, but the son of an Idumeus and an Arab woman. His name meant 'descendant of heroes.' He had the Temple rebuilt larger and more beautiful than before his time.

Based on the text above, 'Idumeus' seems to be the name of the people.






    Reference: http://www.pelagus.it/people/bellavitis/eambient.htm
Marcus Malabad
Canada
Local time: 20:31
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in TagalogTagalog
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The asker has declined this answer

7 hrs
the place is Idumea, the people Idumeans. Supposedly,


Explanation:
they are the sons of Edom.
You can check on the web, it's all over.

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 20:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 1
Grading comment
I think I must be a poor browser!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 hrs
In support of Cecilia


Explanation:
Take a look at the following essay in the Catholic Encyclopedia:

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07638a.htm

“Idumea, the country inhabited by the descendants of Edom. The word Idumea ... appears to have been applied to the region from the red colour of its sandstone cliffs. Idumea was situated south of Juda and the Dead Sea, but its limits, bordering on the wilderness, are difficult to determine. According to Gen., xxxvi, 8 sqq., on leaving Chanaan, Esau took his abode on Mt. Seir, then the home of the Horites (Gen., xiv, 6; D.V.: Chorreans). Mt. Seir is commonly thought to be the Jebel esh-Shera, a range prolonging the mountains of Moab, to the east of the 'Arabah; various indications, however, suggest a more westerly location and lead one to believe that Mt. Seir should be sought rather in the highlands between Cades and the southern end of the Dead Sea. The Tel-el-Amarna tablets, indeed, speak of She-e-ri as a country south of Western Palestine; the same documents mention in that region a city of U-du-mu (Edom), in which Ed-Dome..., south-south-west of Hebron, is recognized, the name being sometimes used to designate the country of the Edomites. On the other hand, the route followed by the Israelites, returning from Cades to Asiongaber (A. V.: Eziongeber; Deut., ii, 8) and skirting to the east of the 'Arabah through Salmona (unknown), Phunon and Oboth (prob. Wady Weibeh), then going north-eastwards to Jeabarim (Kh. 'Ai, east-south-east of Kerak), in order "to compass the land of Edom" (Num., xxi, 4), which they were not allowed to cross (Num., xx, 17), indicates that this land did not extend beyond the 'Arabah. Under the name of Idumea, not only Mt. Seir, but all the surrounding region inhabited by tribes claiming an Edomite descent, is usually understood.

Gen., xxxvi, 31-39, gives a list of "the kings that ruled in the land of Edom, before the children of Israel had a king"; from this list we gather that the Edomite monarchy was elective. In spite of the blood-relationship uniting Israel and Edom, the two peoples were frequently in conflict. Saul had turned his army against the Edomites (I K., xiv, 47); David conquered and garrisoned the country (II K., viii, 14) and Solomon occupied its ports on the Red Sea (III K., ix, 26). During Joram's reign, Idumea succeeded in shaking off for a while the yoke of Jerusalem, but Amasias obliged the Edomites once more to own Juda's sway; finally under Achaz they won their independence. With the fall of Juda into the hands of the Babylonians, whom they had joined in the fray, the power of the Edomites waxed stronger, and they took possession of all Southern Palestine, making Hebron their capital. But despite their alliance with the Syrians during the Machabean war, they could not withstand the sturdy onslaught of the Israelite patriots who drove them from the south of Juda. The loss of their possessions east of the 'Arabah, fallen long since into the hands of the Nabathæans, rendered the Edomites an easy prey to their neighbours, and in 109 B.C. they were conquered by John Hyrcanus, who, however, allowed them to remain in the country on the condition that they should adopt Judaism. When, at the death of Alexandra (69), Aristobulus endeavoured to wrest the crown from his brother Hyrcanus II, Antipater, Governor of Idumea, took the latter's side in the conflict, and, upon the arrival of the Romans, attached himself closely to them. The assistance he lent to their army in several expeditions, and the services he rendered to Julius Caesar were rewarded in 47 by the much-coveted title of Roman citizen and the appointment to the procuratorship of Judea, Samaria, and Galilee. His son was Herod the Great.”

Fuad




    Reference: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07638a.htm
Fuad Yahya
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
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Changes made by editors
Feb 3, 2006 - Changes made by Fuad Yahya:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO
Feb 3, 2006 - Changes made by Fuad Yahya:
FieldArt/Literary » Social Sciences
Field (specific)(none) » Geography


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