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Commission provisoire

English translation: Provisional/ Interim Commission

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Commission provisoire
English translation:Provisional/ Interim Commission
Entered by: TrueBaller
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09:48 Feb 16, 2007
French to English translations [PRO]
History / 1848
French term or phrase: Commission provisoire
Is it just The Provisional Commission?
Should it be translated, left, or given in English and French?
Le 26 février 1848 une poignée d'individus s'empare, à Nancy, de l'Hôtel de Ville sans aucune résistance des autorités. La Commission provisoire qui a pris le pouvoir paraît au balcon de l'Hôtel de Ville et se fait acclamer par la population aux cris de «plus de Bourbon, vive la République ! ».
David West
Local time: 23:20
Provisional/ Interim Commission
Explanation:
Dave,

Hi, again. I am taking Martin's advice to enter this as my answer. (Thanks Martin for your suggestion and support on this. Much appreciated.)

Dave, regarding your last concern, I would say that in my opinion, the reason why the word "Provisoire" is capitalized the second time it is mentioned in your piece is because it is taken as a quote from some other written material where it had appeared as such. Apparently, this Commission has become an historical, proper name and capitalizing the word is the right thing to do or was thought to be the right thing to do by the author of the original written document where it is quoted from. But, I wanted to also tell you from my own experience with this type of documents that, even if capitalizing the first letter of the word would be grammatically wrong, when it appears as a quote taken from somewhere else, it should not be changed. A quote is a quote. You can’t change it. The same refers to the quotation marks “...”. Again their use proves once more that the word is quoted from some other article or written document as it had appeared there before.
Selected response from:

TrueBaller
Local time: 18:20
Grading comment
Thanks Mimoza and everybody for your help.
However I don't agree with the explanation for the 'capitals' etc. I looks more like: 'republicans', 'provisional' , oh yeah pull the other one! See what I mean?
dnwest@hotmail.co.uk
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4Provisional/ Interim Commission
TrueBaller
3 +1interim committee
Odette Grille
3 -1Would leave in French
cjohnstone


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Would leave in French


Explanation:
As a historical fact, would leave it as is (the old game of explanation in brackets might do, but no need would say as both terms can easily be guessed by any English speaker)
Woul leave Commission provisoire with " " But only my own feeling, no more!!!

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Note added at 8 mins (2007-02-16 09:56:58 GMT)
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slow but.. LEAVE IN FRENCH with inverted commas and no need for any clumsy translation, everyone reading a historical text can work it out without explanation (and even explaining might make a potential reader feel one takes him or her for an ignoramus!!!)
So I do confirm, leave it in French!!!with no into bracket translation!! Especially that come to think about it, am not that sure that provisoire and provisional really mean exactly the same thing!!!If anything provisoire would be temporary, not provisional which would methink be closer to conditional!!!! ooops

cjohnstone
France
Local time: 00:20
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  TrueBaller: Not true! Provisional means temporary,too. In this context especially! I also think there is no need to leave the French term especially when the English equivalent exists. Not every English speaker understands French.Sorry,this IS a temporary Commission.
19 mins
  -> yes but historians are used to the original term... provisional does mean temporary but NOT HERE

neutral  Martin Cassell: I see no problem with using the direct English translation; "provisional" is a widely used term in politics and institutions for interim/temporary bodies, in exactly the same contexts as «provisoire».
2 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
interim committee


Explanation:
interim government

Odette Grille
Canada
Local time: 18:20
Works in field
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Assimina Vavoula
1 hr
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5 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Provisional/ Interim Commission


Explanation:
Dave,

Hi, again. I am taking Martin's advice to enter this as my answer. (Thanks Martin for your suggestion and support on this. Much appreciated.)

Dave, regarding your last concern, I would say that in my opinion, the reason why the word "Provisoire" is capitalized the second time it is mentioned in your piece is because it is taken as a quote from some other written material where it had appeared as such. Apparently, this Commission has become an historical, proper name and capitalizing the word is the right thing to do or was thought to be the right thing to do by the author of the original written document where it is quoted from. But, I wanted to also tell you from my own experience with this type of documents that, even if capitalizing the first letter of the word would be grammatically wrong, when it appears as a quote taken from somewhere else, it should not be changed. A quote is a quote. You can’t change it. The same refers to the quotation marks “...”. Again their use proves once more that the word is quoted from some other article or written document as it had appeared there before.

TrueBaller
Local time: 18:20
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in AlbanianAlbanian
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thanks Mimoza and everybody for your help.
However I don't agree with the explanation for the 'capitals' etc. I looks more like: 'republicans', 'provisional' , oh yeah pull the other one! See what I mean?
dnwest@hotmail.co.uk
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