prêt de mot de passe

English translation: communicating a password (to someone else)

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21:53 Dec 13, 2016
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Bus/Financial - IT (Information Technology) / Security policy for IT equipment
French term or phrase: prêt de mot de passe
Hi

I am translating a safety / security policy for an industrial company and the section on IT equipment security has the following:

Vous devez déclarer tout fonctionnement suspect du matériel informatique à l’exploitant.

Le prêt de mot de passe est interdit s'ils sont nominatifs.

I have come up with "The use of another person's password is forbidden if it is nominative". It's the phrase "prêt de mot de passé" that's irritating me - why would you loan your password, or am I missing something? Also I'm not sure why the sentence ends with a plural when presumably it should be singular i.e. mot de passé.

Just looking for a bit of reassurance on this after a long day!

Thanks

Mark
Mark Radcliffe
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:45
English translation:communicating a password (to someone else)
Explanation:
This is the sort of thing banks say!

'lending' your pasword to someone else so they can access your account / document, etc.

I think the plural is used because it means 'lending a password if your company uses individual ones' — see how we naturally use a plural in EN too? As long as you don't fall into the trap of saying 'your password' (as I just did!), then there will be no conflict.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 05:45
Grading comment
Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1communicating a password (to someone else)
Tony M
5password-lending
Francois Boye
4borrowing [other users'] passwords
Daryo


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
communicating a password (to someone else)


Explanation:
This is the sort of thing banks say!

'lending' your pasword to someone else so they can access your account / document, etc.

I think the plural is used because it means 'lending a password if your company uses individual ones' — see how we naturally use a plural in EN too? As long as you don't fall into the trap of saying 'your password' (as I just did!), then there will be no conflict.

Tony M
France
Local time: 05:45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 218
Grading comment
Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard: Yes, I prefer lending as it's the exact English equivalent.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Phil!
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
password-lending


Explanation:
https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=password-lending

Francois Boye
United States
Local time: 23:45
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 7
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
borrowing [other users'] passwords


Explanation:
or loaning [your own password] to other users

or to cover both cases:

using other users' passwords

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 24 mins (2016-12-13 22:18:39 GMT)
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.. if they are personally allocated

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Note added at 4 hrs (2016-12-14 02:00:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The use of another user's password is forbidden if passwords are allocated individually/personally ..."

Daryo
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:45
Native speaker of: Native in SerbianSerbian, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 43

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Actually, 'borrowing' isn't specifically prohibited — the security risk comes from people 'lending' them.
10 mins
  -> it's like selling and buying - all depends from whose viewpoint you look at it // both users are in the wrong - the one letting another user use his/her password, and the one using it.
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