années fermes

English translation: for a firm period of 9 years

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:années fermes
English translation:for a firm period of 9 years
Entered by: Elizabeth Niklewska
Options:
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16:36 May 13, 2018
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s) / Commercial lease
French term or phrase: années fermes
This is in a commercial lease for a building - queried terms in the asterisks.

2.1. Le Bail est consenti pour une durée de neuf (9) *années fermes* qui commencera à courir à compter de la date stipulée à l'article 28 du Bail.

In most of the translations I have found in the internet "ferme" has been left out - one suggests "a minimum of 9 years" and another uses definite but phrases it awkwardly.

Could someone at least suggest what the meaning is or if there is a standard translation?
Elizabeth Niklewska
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:54
for a firm period of 9 years
Explanation:
I think it helps if you look at it as the period being firm, rather than the actual years.

I've explained in the discussion why this is significant.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 03:54
Grading comment
Thanks
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +3fixed (term of nine) years
mrrafe
2for a firm period of 9 years
Tony M
4 -3unalterable years
Francois Boye


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -3
unalterable years


Explanation:
My take

Francois Boye
United States
Local time: 21:54
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: 'years' cannot be either 'alterable' or 'unalterable'
14 mins

disagree  writeaway: your take is mis-taken
15 mins

disagree  AllegroTrans: lawyers don't use terms like this, check it out; and anyway a year is 12 months. Period. Cannot be alterable or unalterable.
5 hrs
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36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
une durée de 9 années fermes
for a firm period of 9 years


Explanation:
I think it helps if you look at it as the period being firm, rather than the actual years.

I've explained in the discussion why this is significant.

Tony M
France
Local time: 03:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 323
Grading comment
Thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
fixed (term of nine) years


Explanation:
If it means a definite nine year duration, I would say "a fixed term of nine years." If not, then I don't know what it means.

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Note added at 53 mins (2018-05-13 17:29:58 GMT)
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Tony, yes - As a tenant I would favor a proviso like this to be assured of nine years despite the risks of early termination by me, e.g. because I wanted protection for long term commitments such as installing a factory. The cut-off date would concern me less than the assurance of nine years because the parties could renew (the purported "fixed" term proviso wouldn't bar this, as they would agree to modify it) or I could demand that the lessee forgo some of the contractual damages if I bailed out early. This often is how leases work in a lessees' market, i.e. where spaces are scarce. But again, admittedly I don't know for sure what it means.

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Note added at 1 hr (2018-05-13 17:48:26 GMT)
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I meant lessor, sorry. (If you are one, you'll know it!)

mrrafe
Local time: 21:54
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: I think that slightly distorts the meaning here: as i understand it, it means making a firm commitment for at least the first 9 years (which does not preclude a possible renewal), whereas this suggests it is 9 years and that's your lot!
3 mins

agree  writeaway: well at least this answer is here for the benefit of others who will be looking for the correct translation
3 hrs

agree  AllegroTrans
4 hrs

agree  GILOU: definitely
12 hrs
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