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aurait conduit

English translation: which is said to have led/which apparently led/which - it is claimed - led

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09:03 Nov 26, 2008
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
Bus/Financial - Law (general) / legal decision
French term or phrase: aurait conduit
The sentence is as follows concerning criminal faults of a company issueing new shares:
[manquements d'order] a l'absence de control relatif a la qualite du souscipteur [of new shares] et a la demultiplication du numbre de certains comptes de la clientele, ce qui aurait conduit a une faiblesse du positif de controle interne.

My go:the lack of internal supervision concerning the quality of subscriber and the reduction of the number from cetain customer accounts, which led to a weakness in the instrument of the internal audit.

Something sounds quite wrong here, especially with the "aurait conduit", which literally means "would have led"
Stephen Rifkind
Israel
Local time: 22:24
English translation:which is said to have led/which apparently led/which - it is claimed - led
Explanation:
FYI the French use the conditional in a hypothetical way that English does not, so you have to dress it up in relation to the surrounding context.

Often you find this type of formulation in newspaper articles where someone has stated something that is not proven and so - to avoid possible libel cases, they use the conditional to introduce the notion of doubt.

Here, since this is a legal argument that has not yet been confirmed or otherwise, they are hedging their bets.

Since in English you cannot use the conditional in this way, you have to elaborate
Selected response from:

polyglot45
Grading comment
Thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4which is said to have led/which apparently led/which - it is claimed - ledpolyglot45
4 +2reportedly/apparently led to
Emma Paulay
3 +1supposedly led to / resulted inBianca AH
3might have led/resulted inmimi 254


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
might have led/resulted in


Explanation:
my understanding

mimi 254
Local time: 20:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 200

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: This isn't the true conditional here, as noted by P/G, Bianca, and Emma, and a different translation solution is really needed.
7 mins
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
supposedly led to / resulted in


Explanation:
It's not the conditional, but the hypothetical.

Just a suggestion, but I'm sure there is better...

Bianca AH
France
Local time: 21:24
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
8 mins
  -> Thanks Tony. Long time!
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
which is said to have led/which apparently led/which - it is claimed - led


Explanation:
FYI the French use the conditional in a hypothetical way that English does not, so you have to dress it up in relation to the surrounding context.

Often you find this type of formulation in newspaper articles where someone has stated something that is not proven and so - to avoid possible libel cases, they use the conditional to introduce the notion of doubt.

Here, since this is a legal argument that has not yet been confirmed or otherwise, they are hedging their bets.

Since in English you cannot use the conditional in this way, you have to elaborate

polyglot45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
Thanks.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  John Peterson
0 min

agree  Tony M: As famously used by Angus Deaton on the BBC '...allegedly...'
4 mins

agree  EJP
1 hr

agree  Aude Sylvain: yes, or "allegedly", as proposed by Tony
2 hrs
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
reportedly/apparently led to


Explanation:
The conditional here is used to mean "is said to have" i.e. it is not confirmed.
1000 personnes auraient été tuées=1000 persons are reported to have been killed

Emma Paulay
France
Local time: 21:24
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  John Peterson
0 min

agree  Tony M: Although your idea is correct, I can't help thinking that neither of these quite fits the best in the given context.
7 mins
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Non-PRO (1): writeaway


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Changes made by editors
Nov 26, 2008 - Changes made by Michele Fauble:
LevelPRO » Non-PRO


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