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droit de présence (bis)

English translation: presence fee

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06:31 Aug 27, 2000
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
French term or phrase: droit de présence (bis)
(Cyberspace) copyright term.

Just to clarify things a bit. This must be a specific copyright term. The word "droit" is being used in the usual copyright sense of "royalty" or "fee". The first answer in the last series (YBROAD) picked this one up. However, I have looked have not yet found an example where the term "attendance right" is used in a copyright context.

[A reminder of the context for those who did not see the last message : X is granting Y the right to be present (logo, advertising banner etc) on its (X's) site in exchange for which Y has to pay over the fixed minimum fee which has been set at ??? F for the first year. The contract provides for revision of this amount if the contract is renewed.]

The term used to describe this fee is "droit de presence". Y pays a "droit de presence" pour le droit d'etre présent!

One other answer last time (DAUPHINE) indicated that the term "Internet presence" is used. It is effectively used by companies which host websites. In these cases, the client company pays an "internet presence fee" to the host.

However, in the case in point, both parties already have a website and they are negotiating the presence of one's info on the other's site. Each will have already paid an "internet presence fee" to their host.

My question now is, can the term "presence fee" be used (dropping the "internet" beforehand, as they are already present on the web). Perhaps I should go for the term "attendance right / fee", Termium apparently providing this in a copyright context. The client is British.
Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Local time: 00:09
English translation:presence fee
Explanation:
Again, I think I would use this expression. You could use "advertising fee", but the text specifically use "droit de présence", and I think that it means: either the right to be present on the other site, for which they pay a fee, or the fee (droit) itself. But I can't find anything that talks about a presence right on a web site. Presence right refers to someone's right to be present somewhere, for instance at a meeting.

Doesn't "attendance" imply a physical presence? I don't think this would be the right word.

The fact that they both already have a website shouldn't exclude the fact that they might pay a fee to secure their presence on the other's website.

Just thinking as I write. Does that make sense?
Selected response from:

Louise Atfield
Grading comment
Thank you for your comments. I decided to use "presence fee" which you put forward in my first message for this term. Don't worry about this one any more.

Nikki
1 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
napresence feeLouise Atfield
naHow about "point-of-presence fee"?Heathcliff
naright of advertising presence
Yolanda Broad


  

Answers


3 hrs
right of advertising presence


Explanation:
Frankly, doing a Web search, I can't right "right of attendance" used in an Internet agreement context anywhere. But I can't find "droit de présence" used that way, either (I tried Alta Vista, Voilà, Northern Lights, Google, HotBot, Inference Find, Metafind and Dogpile) So, let's try again. How about this:

English:Commercial and Other Bodies (Law)
Foreign Trade

right of commercial presence s CORRECT

Mind you, using Alta Vista to do a search, I'm finding this term only in relation to Canadian documents, so who knows...

For. ex. discussing NAFTA:

http://www.tradeport.org/ts/countries/canada/climate.html

AND...

the one real clue, a French site, whigh provides a "demande de présence" to acquire the "droit" to display your products on their site, and an English translation, called "advertising offer".

English: http://www.ibindustry.com/ci/ius/offer.htm
French: http://www.ibindustry.com/ci/ifr/demande.htm


    Reference: http://www.termium.com
    www.ibindustry.com/ci/ius/offer.htm www.ibindustry.com/ci/ifr/demande.htm
Yolanda Broad
United States
Local time: 18:09
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1551

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff
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7 hrs
How about "point-of-presence fee"?


Explanation:
The term "point of presence" is a standard one in telephony and telecommunications, and thus has a technical connection with Internet business. It's also widely used in the advertising and promotion community. -- Just a thought.

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 15:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 953
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day10 hrs
presence fee


Explanation:
Again, I think I would use this expression. You could use "advertising fee", but the text specifically use "droit de présence", and I think that it means: either the right to be present on the other site, for which they pay a fee, or the fee (droit) itself. But I can't find anything that talks about a presence right on a web site. Presence right refers to someone's right to be present somewhere, for instance at a meeting.

Doesn't "attendance" imply a physical presence? I don't think this would be the right word.

The fact that they both already have a website shouldn't exclude the fact that they might pay a fee to secure their presence on the other's website.

Just thinking as I write. Does that make sense?

Louise Atfield
PRO pts in pair: 300
Grading comment
Thank you for your comments. I decided to use "presence fee" which you put forward in my first message for this term. Don't worry about this one any more.

Nikki

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Heathcliff
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