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à perpétuité

English translation: in perpetuity

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02:04 Sep 15, 2000
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s)
French term or phrase: à perpétuité
Yacht race participation agreement, essntially establishing rights to images. The sentence, which is interminably long, is roughly :
"X s'enagage à accorder à Y un accès physique à toutes les images...pendant toute la durée de l'evenément et à perpétuité".

I understand it but in this context, can I say "for perpetuity"?

I need this within one hour of its posting.

Nikki
nikscot
English translation:in perpetuity
Explanation:
I found thousands of references to this legal expression.
See for example:
(in) Perpetuity: forever.It is recommended to negotiate rights for an image for a limited time period. Perpetuity means forever, but the termination right (or, the "recapture right") which the artist keeps if he or she retains authorship is STATUTORY; that is, the copyright statute says clearly that the artist retains the right regardless of the terms of the contract. The termination provision of the copyright law has not been tested yet, as it kicks in at thirty five years and the law has been on the books only since 1978. One of the reasons we are now for the first time seeing "perpetuity" in contracts is because the publishers intend to mount an assault on the termination provision, but as the law is currently constituted, if you retain authorship (no work for hire), even if you sign a contract with a perpetuity clause you or your heirs should be able to terminate it after thirty-five years.

Selected response from:

Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 00:02
Grading comment
Thanks a lot. I am not sure whether your explanation is applicable to the States or England and more specifically to France, which is where the jurisdiction of the agreement lies. I should have indicated that. However, your explanation has reasssured me that I can use a same or simimlar term based on "perpetuity". Someone outside PROZ came up with "indefinitely" which would be useful in an English context as there is an old rule against perpetuities in English law and there have been some moves to restrict & define the rule further in statutory form, apparently.

Thanks to all of you for your help.

Nikki
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
nakeep it "in perpetuity"
Janet Kemp
naand for life timeTelesforo Fernandez
nain perpetuity
Gillian Hargreaves
nain perpetuity
Laura Gentili
nain perpetuityProtradit


  

Answers


7 mins
in perpetuity


Explanation:
.


    .
Protradit
Local time: 15:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Yolanda Broad
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins
in perpetuity


Explanation:
I found thousands of references to this legal expression.
See for example:
(in) Perpetuity: forever.It is recommended to negotiate rights for an image for a limited time period. Perpetuity means forever, but the termination right (or, the "recapture right") which the artist keeps if he or she retains authorship is STATUTORY; that is, the copyright statute says clearly that the artist retains the right regardless of the terms of the contract. The termination provision of the copyright law has not been tested yet, as it kicks in at thirty five years and the law has been on the books only since 1978. One of the reasons we are now for the first time seeing "perpetuity" in contracts is because the publishers intend to mount an assault on the termination provision, but as the law is currently constituted, if you retain authorship (no work for hire), even if you sign a contract with a perpetuity clause you or your heirs should be able to terminate it after thirty-five years.



Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 00:02
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks a lot. I am not sure whether your explanation is applicable to the States or England and more specifically to France, which is where the jurisdiction of the agreement lies. I should have indicated that. However, your explanation has reasssured me that I can use a same or simimlar term based on "perpetuity". Someone outside PROZ came up with "indefinitely" which would be useful in an English context as there is an old rule against perpetuities in English law and there have been some moves to restrict & define the rule further in statutory form, apparently.

Thanks to all of you for your help.

Nikki

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Yolanda Broad
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16 mins
in perpetuity


Explanation:
Eurodicautom suggests the following for "concession à perpétuité: "grant in perpetuity; perpetual grant"


    Reference: http://eurodic.ip.lu:8086//cgi-bin/edicbin/expert.pl
Gillian Hargreaves
Local time: 23:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Yolanda Broad
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35 mins
and for life time


Explanation:
I would translate it this way. In perpetuity( or perpetually) is not used, at least specifically in this case.

Telesforo Fernandez
Local time: 04:32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Yolanda Broad
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4 hrs
keep it "in perpetuity"


Explanation:
The correct legal term is definitely "in perpetuity". Do not use "indefinitely" because it's not really a legal term in US contract law, even though it means the same thing.

Janet Kemp
United States
Local time: 18:02
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Changes made by editors
Dec 22, 2010 - Changes made by Stéphanie Soudais:
Term askedURGENT - intellectual property term : \"à perpétuité\" » à perpétuité
Field (specific)(none) » Law: Contract(s)


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