KudoZ home » French to English » Law/Patents

Le Signataire s'est engagé à concéder les droits intellectuels & artistiques ...

English translation: How about "The Signatory has agreed to assign...

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
11:17 Sep 22, 2000
French to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
French term or phrase: Le Signataire s'est engagé à concéder les droits intellectuels & artistiques ...
- The full sentence reads :

"Le Signataire s'est engagé à concéder les drtois intellectuels & artiqtiques de certains éléments liés à "NOM DE L'EVENEMENT".

- My draft translation reads :

"The Signatory has undertaken to grant a licence in repsect of copyright to certain elements linked to THE NAME OF THE EVENT".

What I have is cumbersome. My brain is giving out. Any suggestions as to improvement? There's room for it!

Nikki
nikscot
English translation:How about "The Signatory has agreed to assign...
Explanation:
...the intellectual and artistic rights (copyright) to certain elements associated with "NAME OF THE EVENT"?

Naturally, patent rights or copyrights can be transferred or ceded, but the usual word in American legal English is "assignment," and the verb of course is "to assign."

"Granting a license" may in fact be what's happening here, but absent any confirmation elsewhere in the French text, using this English phrase might put you onto somewhat thin ice, legally speaking, because copyrights can certainly be assigned (or ceded, or transferred) without the formal step of granting a license.

"Relinquish" is another good choice, but again only if the context supports it, because it implies a permanent transfer of the intellectual and artistic rights.

Incidentally, although our word "copyright" refers specically to the intellectual and artistic rights that are granted to the author or originator of certain literary or artistic productions, in translating contracts and agreements like this one I find it's usually a good idea to replicate the phrase "intellectual and artistic rights" directly from the French, and follow it, as above, with "(copyright)" -- just to cover all the semantic bases.

Cheers, HC
Selected response from:

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 09:22
Grading comment
Oh thank you!
The person who drafted the document, an FR-EN bi-lingual (US( lawyer, has imposed "copyright" for "propriété intellectuelle & artistique". I did not like that as to my mind it did not cast the net wide enough, being more rsetrictive in my view than the French. I had originally put "intellectual and artistic property".

Further, the original was an "acte de cession" (deed of assignment - as we all know and love). AS I undertsand it, that is what would be more commonly expected here. Certain things have forced through a change and that part of the agreement has now become a "grant of licence" (the clients imposed words, not mine.

Should I start defending myself a bit more vehemently on this one perhaps?! Parts of it are begining to sound very odd indeed.

Thanks Heather

Nikki
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
naon second thoughts///Brian KEEGAN
naThe signatory has agreed to cede intellectual and artistic rights to certain elements connected withLouise Atfield
naHow about "The Signatory has agreed to assign...Heathcliff
narelinquishxxxLia Fail
narelinquish...Brian KEEGAN
naThe signatory has committed to concede intellectual and artistic rights
Roomy Naqvy
naThe signatory binds himself to grant the rights of intellectual
Parrot
naThe signatory has decided to give up the intellectual and artistic rights
Luis Luis


  

Answers


5 mins
The signatory has decided to give up the intellectual and artistic rights


Explanation:
Regards.
Luis Luis

Luis Luis
United States
Local time: 11:22
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 35
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 mins
The signatory has committed to concede intellectual and artistic rights


Explanation:
Or 'The signatory has decided to give up intellectual...' though one just thought that it is a kind of legal language and 'decide to give up' may not be so appropriate. Probably, the signatory 'decided to concede' ot 'committed to concede'.
---------------

This was your sentence.....
"The Signatory has undertaken to grant a licence in repsect of copyright to certain elements linked to THE NAME OF THE EVENT".

Lets see this one now....
"The signatory has undertaken to concede intellectual and artistic rights with respect to certain elements connected to THE NAME OF THE EVENT".

Or...
"The signatory has signed an undertaking to concede intellectual and artistic rights....".

Best wishes
Lets think of more alternatives if needed.
Regards
Roomy Naqvy

Roomy Naqvy
India
Local time: 22:52
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi
PRO pts in pair: 16
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

24 mins
The signatory binds himself to grant the rights of intellectual


Explanation:
and artistic property over certain elements in connection to XXX.

Instead of grant, you could also use cede, but that may be going too far in interpretation.

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 18:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1861
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

36 mins
relinquish...


Explanation:
What about:

The Signatory undertakes to relinquish copyright with respect to certain elements of NAME OF THE EVENT

(I think \"relinquish\" is the term used in connection with rights).

or instead of copyright: intellectual and artistic property rights...

As for brains giving out, join the club!!! Me too...

Brian KEEGAN
Local time: 18:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 17
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

36 mins
relinquish


Explanation:
"The undersigned undertakes to grant/relinquish the intellectual and artististic rights associated with certain elements of the event name/name of the event"

Note NB difference between grant (=> to somebody) and simply 'give up' or relinquish; the second makes it sound like the person concerened is signing a document to guarantee that he/she never more can make a claim on the 'rights'

xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 18:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 60
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

43 mins
on second thoughts///


Explanation:
I missed the "con" part of "conceder", which would make it "concede" I suppose. Although Black's Law Dictionary makes reference to comcession only in terms of governments conceding rights to foreign corporations.....

Brian KEEGAN
Local time: 18:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 17
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

52 mins
The signatory has agreed to cede intellectual and artistic rights to certain elements connected with


Explanation:
Just another suggestion...

Louise Atfield
PRO pts in pair: 300

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Roomy Naqvy
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs
How about "The Signatory has agreed to assign...


Explanation:
...the intellectual and artistic rights (copyright) to certain elements associated with "NAME OF THE EVENT"?

Naturally, patent rights or copyrights can be transferred or ceded, but the usual word in American legal English is "assignment," and the verb of course is "to assign."

"Granting a license" may in fact be what's happening here, but absent any confirmation elsewhere in the French text, using this English phrase might put you onto somewhat thin ice, legally speaking, because copyrights can certainly be assigned (or ceded, or transferred) without the formal step of granting a license.

"Relinquish" is another good choice, but again only if the context supports it, because it implies a permanent transfer of the intellectual and artistic rights.

Incidentally, although our word "copyright" refers specically to the intellectual and artistic rights that are granted to the author or originator of certain literary or artistic productions, in translating contracts and agreements like this one I find it's usually a good idea to replicate the phrase "intellectual and artistic rights" directly from the French, and follow it, as above, with "(copyright)" -- just to cover all the semantic bases.

Cheers, HC

Heathcliff
United States
Local time: 09:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 953
Grading comment
Oh thank you!
The person who drafted the document, an FR-EN bi-lingual (US( lawyer, has imposed "copyright" for "propriété intellectuelle & artistique". I did not like that as to my mind it did not cast the net wide enough, being more rsetrictive in my view than the French. I had originally put "intellectual and artistic property".

Further, the original was an "acte de cession" (deed of assignment - as we all know and love). AS I undertsand it, that is what would be more commonly expected here. Certain things have forced through a change and that part of the agreement has now become a "grant of licence" (the clients imposed words, not mine.

Should I start defending myself a bit more vehemently on this one perhaps?! Parts of it are begining to sound very odd indeed.

Thanks Heather

Nikki
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search